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You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("Jim Cobbe"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida State University

1. Kerloc’H, Klervia. Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?.

Degree: MS, 2012, Florida State University

Globalization has been associated with the hegemony of traditional Western economic powers. However, the twenty-first century announced the emergence of new economic powers. The financial crisis crippling the West has not been as detrimental to these Southern economies and could introduce a new international balance of power. It also demonstrated that economic activities should serve humanity. While the BRICS club (Brazil, Russia, India, China, and South Africa) constitutes a plurilateral - because of its selectiveness - challenge and strength to multilateralist Western institutions, developing economies are attracting growing attention, especially Africa in the past decade. Similarly, Brazil's social and political conditions have been considerably ameliorating, thus distinguishing it from the other emerging powers. The South-South bridge between Africa and Brazil could then announce a new international economic and diplomatic order. A presentation of Brazil and Africa will lead to the description of the levels of governance interactions between the two regions and their economic exchanges. Finally, the socio-economic prospects of such relation and their consequences in the multilateral globalized world will be presented. I will then argue the possibility for the Brazil-Africa relationship, a mainly plurilateralist one, to initiate a new form of multilateralism, one uniting economic and social development.

A Thesis submitted to the Department of International Affairs in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science.

Summer Semester, 2012.

June 19, 2012.

Africa, Brazil, Economic Diplomacy, Multilateralism, Plurilateralism, South-South Cooperation

Jim Cobbe, Professor Directing Thesis; Petra Doan, Committee Member; Alexander Aviña, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Jim Cobbe (professor directing thesis), Petra Doan (committee member), Alexander Aviña (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: International relations

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APA (6th Edition):

Kerloc’H, K. (2012). Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?. (Masters Thesis). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4943 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kerloc’H, Klervia. “Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Florida State University. Accessed May 19, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4943 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kerloc’H, Klervia. “Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?.” 2012. Web. 19 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Kerloc’H K. Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Florida State University; 2012. [cited 2019 May 19]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4943 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Kerloc’H K. Economic Relations Between Brazil and Africa: A Brick in the Southern Bridge to Multilateralism?. [Masters Thesis]. Florida State University; 2012. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-4943 ;


Florida State University

2. Ofori, Benjamin. Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra.

Degree: PhD, Urban and Regional Planning, 2012, Florida State University

First, this study draws on a multidisciplinary social science literature on institutions to outline the concept of institutional informalism, which is then developed further into two related sub-concepts: urban informalism and bureaucratic informalism. The central thesis of both frameworks is that informality can be seen as a process of interaction between the institutional rationalities of the formal institutions of the state and informal institutions of society in which the former is shaped by the latter. Second, as part of the critical review of literature, the concept of `urban informalism' is used to analyze five empirical case examples drawn from the literature as a way to assess what the contemporary idea of urban informality means for policy and practice and the governance of local areas when considered in its alternative understandings as urban informalism. The critical review concludes that urban informality can be seen as a constantly ongoing institutional process in which urban informal actors in pursuit of everyday aspirations of city life knit and reknit the composite institutional fabric and appropriate the monopolized epistemic enactments of the city in an urban theater of unequal power. This can be seen in the infinite processes of experimentation, power play and institutionalization that sustain the effective governing framework in a constant state of flux and reinvention. Third, using the second sub-concept of bureaucratic informalism, I use qualitative methods of study to examine the transactional experiences of urban residents of Accra as it relates to the access to public sector services and opportunities and I identify the informal structures and relations that shape such public sector transactions. Firstly, consistent with theory and existing empirical work, the study finds that informal relational structures in the form of kinship, friendship and co-ethnicity play an important role in facilitating access to public sector services and opportunities. Secondly, the study finds new evidence regarding informal structures and relations of power associated with partisanship and the exploitation of incumbency and the leveraging of power by officialdom and the wealthy urban middle class. The study finds that such leveraging of power enables powerful individuals and their affiliates to obtain privileged access to services and opportunities in the public sector. Such leveraging of power also enables the powerful and the wealthy to appropriate legally and illegally the resources and protections of the law and public policy. It also enables them to play by different sets of rules and standards outside the framework of law and public policy.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Urban and Regional Planning in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Fall Semester, 2012.

October 26, 2012.

access to public services, informal governance, informal networks, institutional theory, institutions and governance in Africa, urban…

Advisors/Committee Members: Rebecca Miles (professor directing dissertation), Jim Cobbe (university representative), Petra Doan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Cities and towns; Study and teaching; City planning

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ofori, B. (2012). Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5416 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ofori, Benjamin. “Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed May 19, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5416 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ofori, Benjamin. “Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra.” 2012. Web. 19 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Ofori B. Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2012. [cited 2019 May 19]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5416 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Ofori B. Institutional Informalism in City Life and the Public Sector: Its Implications for Planning, Policy and Local Governance and Urban Residents' Access to Public Services in Accra. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2012. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-5416 ;


Florida State University

3. Antal, Carrie Kristin. Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, 2010, Florida State University

In democratizing states around the world, civic education programs have long formed a critical component of government and donor strategy to support the development of civil society and strengthen citizens' democratic competencies, encompassing the knowledge, attitudes and skills required for them to become informed and actively engaged participants in the economic and social development of their country. Such programs, however, have had limited success. Despite research that has identified critical components of successful democratic civic education programs, including the use of learner-centered methods and experiential civic learning opportunities rooted in real-world contexts, these programs continue to produce weak results. This study targets an under-examined link in the policy-to-practice chain: the teachers themselves. By applying a qualitative, grounded theory approach to analyze interview and observation data collected from public primary schools, teacher training institutes and other key sites in Madagascar where best practices in civic education have recently been adopted, this research presents original insight into the ways in which teachers conceptualize and execute their role as civic educator in a democratizing state. The impact of training and the diverse obstacles emerging from political and economic underdevelopment are examined and analyzed. Emerging from this analysis, a new approach to conceptualizing civic education programs is proposed in which a direct ('front-door') and an indirect ('back-door') approach to the development of democracy through civic education are assigned equal credence as legitimate, situationally-appropriate alternatives to utilize in the effort to strengthen political institutions, civil society and citizen participation in developing democracies around the world.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Fall Semester, 2010.

October 27, 2010.

Democracy, Civic Education, Citizenship, Teacher Training, Madagascar, Learner-Centered Pedagogy, Active Methods, Democratization, Sub-Saharan Africa

Peter Easton, Professor Directing Dissertation; Jim Cobbe, University Representative; Sande Milton, Committee Member; Jeff Milligan, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Peter Easton (professor directing dissertation), Jim Cobbe (university representative), Sande Milton (committee member), Jeff Milligan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Educational evaluation; Education; Research

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Antal, C. K. (2010). Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0220 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Antal, Carrie Kristin. “Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed May 19, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0220 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Antal, Carrie Kristin. “Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar.” 2010. Web. 19 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Antal CK. Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2010. [cited 2019 May 19]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0220 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Antal CK. Educating for Democratic Citizenship: An Analysis of the Role of Teachers in Implementing Civic Education Policy in Madagascar. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2010. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-0220 ;

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