Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("James Michael Overton"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Florida State University

1. Parise, Eric Michael. Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2011, Florida State University

Hypothalamic orexin neurons project to the hindbrain, and 4th-intracerebroventricular (4th-icv) orexin-A treatment increases food intake. Here, we assessed the effects of hindbrain orexin-A and the selective orexin-1-receptor antagonist SB334867 on meal pattern in rats consuming standard chow. When injected 4th-icv shortly before dark onset, lower doses of orexin-A increased food intake over a 2-h period by significantly increasing the size of the first meal relative to vehicle, whereas the highest dose increased food intake by causing the second meal to be taken sooner. Conversely, hindbrain orexin-1-receptor blockade significantly reduced food intake by decreasing the size of the first meal of the dark phase. We also examined the effects of 4th-icv orexin-A and SB334867 on locomotor activity. Only the highest dose of orexin-A increased activity, and SB334867 had no effect. These data support the suggestion that endogenous hindbrain orexin-A acts to limit satiation. Both orexin-A and the pancreatic satiation hormone amylin require an intact Area Postrema (AP) to affect food intake, so we asked whether 4th-icv orexin-A impairs the satiating effect of peripheral amylin treatment. Amylin significantly reduced the size of the first meal of the dark cycle when rats were pre-treated with 4th-icv saline, yet amylin was ineffective after 4th-icv orexin-A pre-treatment. Using double-label immunohistochemistry, we determined that some orexin-A fibers in the AP are located in proximity to amylin-responsive neurons. We conclude that hindbrain orexin-A may increase food intake in part by reducing the ability of rats to respond to amylin during a meal.

A Thesis submitted to the Department of Psychology in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Arts.

Summer Semester, 2011.

May 18, 2011.

Diana L. Williams, Professor Directing Thesis; James Michael Overton, Committee Member; Pam Keel, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Diana L. Williams (professor directing thesis), James Michael Overton (committee member), Pam Keel (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Psychology; Neurosciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Parise, E. M. (2011). Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size. (Masters Thesis). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-7209 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Parise, Eric Michael. “Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Florida State University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-7209 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Parise, Eric Michael. “Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size.” 2011. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Parise EM. Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Florida State University; 2011. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-7209 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Parise EM. Evidence for the Role of Hinbrain Orexin-1 Receptors in the Control of Meal Size. [Masters Thesis]. Florida State University; 2011. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_migr_etd-7209 ;


Florida State University

2. Baur, Daniel A. (Daniel Alan). The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance.

Degree: PhD, Nutrition, Food, and Exercise Science, 2017, Florida State University

BACKGROUND: It is well-documented that ingesting carbohydrate prior to exercise attenuates fat oxidation. However, it is yet to be established whether this effect is primarily the result of alterations in the mobilization of free fatty acids (FFA) from adipose tissue (i.e. lipolysis). Additionally, there is evidence suggesting that the glycemic index of carbohydrate influences the magnitude of the attenuation in fat oxidation. Specifically, low glycemic index carbohydrate increases fat oxidation relative to high glycemic index carbohydrate. Whether this effect is also due to alterations in adipose tissue metabolism is unknown. Finally, as increasing fat oxidation results in sparing of endogenous carbohydrate, it is possible that pre-exercise low glycemic index carbohydrate may enhance overall energy availability, particularly late in exercise, thereby enhancing endurance performance. PURPOSE: To determine the impact of pre-exercise carbohydrate of different glycemic indices on subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) metabolism and running performance. METHODS: Ten trained male runners (mass = 67.1 ± 7.4 kg, VO2max = 63.5 ± 5.3 ml∙kg-1∙min-1, 5-km personal best = 15.9 ± 3.3 min) completed three experimental trials consisting of 30 min at 60% VO2max, 30 min at 75% VO2max, and a 5-km time trial (TT). Thirty min prior to exercise, participants consumed one of three treatment beverages: 1) 75 g low glycemic index modified waxy maize starch supplement (UCAN), 2) 75 g high glycemic index sucrose- and glucose-based supplement (G), or 3) a flavor-, color-, and texture-matched non-caloric placebo (PL). SCAAT lipolysis was assessed via microdialysis. Resting and exercise gas exchange (i.e. VO2 and fuel selection patterns) was assessed via indirect calorimetry. Glucose, insulin, catecholamine, FFA, and glycerol concentrations were analyzed in whole blood and/or plasma at rest and during exercise. Perceptual responses (i.e. gastrointestinal comfort and perceived exertion) during exercise were measured via visual analog scales. Data were analyzed via magnitude-based inferences (i.e. performance, gas exchange, and perceptual responses) and null hypothesis testing (i.e. plasma and interstitial variables; p < 0.05). RESULTS: Immediately prior to exercise, blood glucose was elevated with G vs. PL (+53.0 ± 21.3 mg∙dL-1 [SD]; p = 0.000) and G vs. UCAN (+36.6 ± 24.9 mg∙dL-1; p = 0.00007). Additionally, insulin was increased prior to exercise with G vs. PL (+33.9 ± 11.0 µU∙mL-1; p = 0.000), UCAN vs. PL (+8.7 ± 4.4 µU∙mL-1; p = 0.039), and G vs. UCAN (+25.2 ± 11.0 µU∙mL-1; p = 0.000). VO2 was increased prior to exercise with G vs. PL (+19.6% ± 12.5; likelihoods [%] increase/trivial/decrease: 98/1/0) and UCAN vs PL (10.9 ± 12.2%; 86/11/2). Carbohydrate oxidation was elevated prior to exercise with G vs. PL (+200.1 ± 89.9%; 100/0/0) and G vs. UCAN (+75.5 ± 20.0%; 99/0/0). In addition, carbohydrate oxidation was enhanced at 65% VO2max with G vs. PL (22.9 ± 17.5%; 95/5/0) and UCAN vs. PL (+75.5 ± 20.0%; 75/24/1). Fat oxidation was… Advisors/Committee Members: Michael J. Ormsbee (professor directing dissertation), James Michael Overton (university representative), Lynn B. Panton (committee member), Jeong-Su Kim (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Physiology

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Baur, D. A. (. A. (2017). The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2017SP_Baur_fsu_0071E_13696 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Baur, Daniel A (Daniel Alan). “The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed October 15, 2019. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2017SP_Baur_fsu_0071E_13696 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Baur, Daniel A (Daniel Alan). “The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance.” 2017. Web. 15 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Baur DA(A. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Oct 15]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2017SP_Baur_fsu_0071E_13696 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Baur DA(A. The Effects of Pre-Exercise Modified Starch Ingestion on Adipose Tissue Lipolysis and Running Performance. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2017. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2017SP_Baur_fsu_0071E_13696 ;

.