Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Florida State University" +contributor:("Andrea U. De Giorgi"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Florida State University

1. Youngblood, Dustin Shawn. The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire.

Degree: PhD, Classics, 2016, Florida State University

This dissertation examines Roman history during the first centuries BCE and CE through the lens of food. Starting at the end with an exegesis of Juvenal’s Satires, I focus on his main gastronomic stereotypes, foods that distinguish people by class. First, I evaluate the bread, the boar, and the turbot as part of Roman culture in order to determine their veracity as stereotypes. Then, by tracing the changing role of these foods from the late Republic through the early Empire, I consider Juvenal’s underlying message in their use. This method has produced some rather compelling conclusions. The successes of the plebs in acquiring and protecting the frumentatio (free grain distribution) define the history of republican politics and imperial administration. Rather than reading panem et circenses (bread and circuses) as a derogatory statement about the lack of political will among the people, I argue that Juvenal is sarcastically acknowledging the people’s victories and their prudence in avoiding frivolous aspirations. Also, the boar was the quintessential meat of Rome, largely thanks to the market subsidy of the frumentatio. Men like Juvenal’s Virro who wish to emulate the extravagant dinners of Roman cuisine but lack the will or ability to treat their guests equally find the monetization of client services a convenient excuse to practice disparity at the cena recta (formal dinner), a trend which reflects the mounting inadequacies of the institution of patronage and the increasing reliance upon currency and markets. Finally, fish metaphors in literature almost always represent excess, and Juvenal’s specific use of the turbot exemplifies the importance of size to Domitian’s, and his court’s, concept of empire. Likewise, the cenatio (dining-hall) at the Domus Flavia reflects the emperor’s appropriation of absolute authority and jurisdiction. This exploration of gastronomic stereotypes in Juvenal validates and encourages the use of food as a historical lens for detecting fundamental changes in politics, economy, society, and empire.

A Dissertation submitted to the Department of Classics in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy.

Fall Semester 2016.

November 7, 2016.

cena recta, Domus Flavia, food and identity, frumentatio, Juvenal, Rome

Laurel Fulkerson, Professor Directing Dissertation; David Levenson, University Representative; Trevor Luke, Committee Member; Andrea De Giorgi, Committee Member.

Advisors/Committee Members: Laurel Fulkerson (professor directing dissertation), David B. Levenson (university representative), Trevor Luke (committee member), Andrea U. De Giorgi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Civilization, Greco-Roman; History, Ancient; Social structure

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Youngblood, D. S. (2016). The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FA2016_Youngblood_fsu_0071E_13524 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Youngblood, Dustin Shawn. “The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed May 30, 2020. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FA2016_Youngblood_fsu_0071E_13524 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Youngblood, Dustin Shawn. “The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire.” 2016. Web. 30 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Youngblood DS. The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2016. [cited 2020 May 30]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FA2016_Youngblood_fsu_0071E_13524 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Youngblood DS. The Culinary World of Juvenal: Food and Identity at Rome from Republic to Empire. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2016. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_FA2016_Youngblood_fsu_0071E_13524 ;


Florida State University

2. Jazwa, Kyle Alexander. Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups.

Degree: PhD, Classics, 2016, Florida State University

In this study, I reconsider the term, "Mycenaean," and its social significance. As a starting point, I utilize the essential qualities of the term's definition: a group of individuals living in mainland Greece during the Late Helladic period. Because the use of this term implicitly distinguishes the organization of such individuals from the previous and subsequent epochs, I also seek a social group that was organized uniquely relative to the periods that bookend it. With this stated goal, I consider identity during a broad chronological period, Early Helladic III to Protogeometric, in mainland Greece and compare the reconstructed social networks diachronically. In order to identify past social groups, I develop a new methodology that employs a behavioral approach to the analysis of domestic architecture. The integration of social groups is maintained by the performance and recognition of shared practices in the context and environment of interaction among the members. Thus, a high degree of correspondence of behaviors related to the daily lived-in environment, i.e. domestic architecture, can reveal networks of individuals constituting a daily social group. With this, I examine 458 domestic structures excavated in mainland Greece each for evidence of 180 individual aspects of architectural construction and spatial organization. I then consider the overall correspondence of such direct behaviors and behavior-guiding attributes, together named Behavioral Aspects, and the mean values for individual construction techniques. With these data, I reconstruct social networks during each phase of the study period and comment on social organization and architectural change during the study period. In the end, I identify a Late Helladic social group that is uniquely organized relative to the preceding and subsequent epochs. In Late Helladic II to Late Helladic IIIC, individuals in mainland Greece become integrated into a single social group. Prior to this period, the behavioral correspondence analysis indicates the existence of two separate social groups that cohabitated many settlements. These groups were most distinct in Early Helladic III, but became increasingly integrated over time. Following the Late Helladic IIIC period there is a demonstrable fragmentation of the social network and a different spatial organization of the domestic architecture. This suggests a social crisis of some sort and the incorporation of new behaviors and perceptions of built space during the Protogeometric period. Such a sudden process of change appears to be the result of multiple causes, including isolation, population movement, and the introduction of outside groups. With all of this considered, the unified social network and conservatism of building traditions in LH II to LH IIIC attest to a … Advisors/Committee Members: Daniel J. Pullen (professor directing dissertation), Jack Freiberg (university representative), Christopher A. Pfaff (committee member), Andrea U. De Giorgi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Archaeology; Civilization, Greco-Roman

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jazwa, K. A. (2016). Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida State University. Retrieved from http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Jazwa_fsu_0071E_13045 ;

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jazwa, Kyle Alexander. “Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida State University. Accessed May 30, 2020. http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Jazwa_fsu_0071E_13045 ;.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jazwa, Kyle Alexander. “Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups.” 2016. Web. 30 May 2020.

Vancouver:

Jazwa KA. Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida State University; 2016. [cited 2020 May 30]. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Jazwa_fsu_0071E_13045 ;.

Council of Science Editors:

Jazwa KA. Building Mycenaean Identity: A Systematic Analysis of Early Helladic III to Protogeometric Domestic Architecture in Mainland Greece for Evidence of Social Groups. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida State University; 2016. Available from: http://purl.flvc.org/fsu/fd/FSU_2016SP_Jazwa_fsu_0071E_13045 ;

.