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You searched for +publisher:"Florida International University" +contributor:("W. Lee Hearn"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Swortwood, Madeleine Jean. Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs.

Degree: PhD, Chemistry, 2013, Florida International University

New designer drugs are constantly emerging onto the illicit drug market and it is often difficult to validate and maintain comprehensive analytical methods for accurate detection of these compounds. Generally, toxicology laboratories utilize a screening method, such as immunoassay, for the presumptive identification of drugs of abuse. When a positive result occurs, confirmatory methods, such as gas chromatography (GC) or liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS), are required for more sensitive and specific analyses. In recent years, the need to study the activities of these compounds in screening assays as well as to develop confirmatory techniques to detect them in biological specimens has been recognized. Severe intoxications and fatalities have been encountered with emerging designer drugs, presenting analytical challenges for detection and identification of such novel compounds. The first major task of this research was to evaluate the performance of commercially available immunoassays to determine if designer drugs were cross-reactive. The second major task was to develop and validate a confirmatory method, using LC-MS, to identify and quantify these designer drugs in biological specimens. Cross-reactivity towards the cathinone derivatives was found to be minimal. Several other phenethylamines demonstrated cross-reactivity at low concentrations, but results were consistent with those published by the assay manufacturer or as reported in the literature. Current immunoassay-based screening methods may not be ideal for presumptively identifying most designer drugs, including the “bath salts.” For this reason, an LC-MS based confirmatory method was developed for 32 compounds, including eight cathinone derivatives, with limits of quantification in the range of 1-10 ng/mL. The method was fully validated for selectivity, matrix effects, stability, recovery, precision, and accuracy. In order to compare the screening and confirmatory techniques, several human specimens were analyzed to demonstrate the importance of using a specific analytical method, such as LC-MS, to detect designer drugs in serum as immunoassays lack cross-reactivity with the novel compounds. Overall, minimal cross-reactivity was observed, highlighting the conclusion that these presumptive screens cannot detect many of the designer drugs and that a confirmatory technique, such as the LC-MS, is required for the comprehensive forensic toxicological analysis of designer drugs. Advisors/Committee Members: Anthony DeCaprio, Piero Gardinali, W. Lee Hearn, Jaroslava Mikšovská, Georg Petroianu.

Subjects/Keywords: designer drugs; toxicology; LC-MS; ELISA; EMIT; cross-reactivity; cathinone derivatives; forensic toxicology; bath salts; Analytical Chemistry; Toxicology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swortwood, M. J. (2013). Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/997 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13120611 ; FI13120611

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swortwood, Madeleine Jean. “Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/997 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13120611 ; FI13120611.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swortwood, Madeleine Jean. “Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs.” 2013. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Swortwood MJ. Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2013. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/997 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13120611 ; FI13120611.

Council of Science Editors:

Swortwood MJ. Comprehensive Forensic Toxicological Analysis of Designer Drugs. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2013. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/997 ; 10.25148/etd.FI13120611 ; FI13120611


Florida International University

2. Tolliver, Samantha S. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood.

Degree: Chemistry, 2010, Florida International University

In the field of postmortem toxicology, principles from pharmacology and toxicology are combined in order to determine if exogenous substances contributed to ones death. In order to make this determination postmortem and (whenever available) antemortem blood samples may be analyzed. This project focused on evaluating the relationship between postmortem and antemortem blood drug levels, in order to better define an interpretive framework for postmortem toxicology. To do this, it was imperative to evaluate the differences in antemortem and postmortem drug concentrations, determine the role microbial activity and evaluate drug stability. Microbial studies determined that the bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa could use the carbon structures of drugs as a source of food. This would suggest prior to sample collection, microbial activity could potentially affect drug levels. This process however would stop before toxicologic evaluation, as at autopsy blood samples are stored in tubes containing the antimicrobial agent sodium fluoride. Analysis of preserved blood determined that under the current storage conditions sodium fluoride effectively inhibited microbial growth. Nonetheless, in many instances inconsistent drug concentrations were identified. When comparing antemortem to postmortem results, diphenhydramine, morphine, codeine and methadone, all showed significantly increased postmortem drug levels. In many instances, increased postmortem concentrations correlated with extended postmortem intervals. Other drugs, such as alprazolam, were likely to have concentration discrepancies when short antemortem to death intervals were coupled with extended postmortem intervals. While still others, such as midazolam followed the expected pattern of metabolism and elimination, which often resulted in decreased postmortem concentrations. The importance of drug stability was displayed when reviewing the clonazepam/ 7-aminoclonazepam data, as the parent drug commonly converted to its metabolite even when stored in the presence of a preservative. In instances of decreasing postmortem drug concentrations the effect of refrigerated storage could not be ruled out. A stability experiment, which contained codeine, produced data that indicated concentrations could continue to decline under the current storage conditions. The cumulative data gathered for this experiment was used to identify concentration trends, which subsequently aided in the development of interpretive considerations for the specific analytes examined in the study. Advisors/Committee Members: Kenneth Furton, Yong Cai, W. Lee Hearn, Bruce McCord, DeEtta Mills.

Subjects/Keywords: Postmortem Toxicology; Postmortem Redistribution; Postmortem Blood; Antemortem Blood

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tolliver, S. S. (2010). An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/321 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120802 ; FI10120802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tolliver, Samantha S. “An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood.” 2010. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed August 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/321 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120802 ; FI10120802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tolliver, Samantha S. “An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood.” 2010. Web. 08 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Tolliver SS. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2010. [cited 2020 Aug 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/321 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120802 ; FI10120802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Tolliver SS. An Investigation of the Relationship Between Antemortem and Postmortem Drug Concentrations in Blood. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2010. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/321 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10120802 ; FI10120802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.