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You searched for +publisher:"Florida International University" +contributor:("Oren B. Stier"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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1. Paz, Anthony. The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence.

Degree: MA, Religious Studies, 2016, Florida International University

This thesis investigates the nature of environmental racism, a by-product of “slow violence” under capitalism, from the perspective of Jain philosophy. By observing slow violence through the lens of Jain doctrine and ethics, I investigate whether the central tenets of ahimsa and karma are philosophically anti-capitalist, and if there are facets within Jain ethics supporting slow violence. By analyzing the ascetic and lay ethical models, I conclude that the maximization of profit and private acquisition of lands/resources are capitalist attributes that cannot thrive efficiently under a proper Jain ethical model centered on ahimsa (non-harm, non-violence) and world-denying/world-renouncing practices. Conversely, karma and Jain cosmology has the potential to support slow violence when considering their philosophical and fatalistic implications. Furthermore, by connecting the theory of slow violence with the theory of microaggressions, I assert that, while resolving microaggressions, Jainism’s highly individualistic ethical system can hinder confronting slow violence. Advisors/Committee Members: Steven M. Vose, Whitney Bauman, Oren B. Stier.

Subjects/Keywords: Karma; Ahimsa; Capitalism; Jainism; Violence; Racism; Environment; Asian Studies; Ethics in Religion; Inequality and Stratification; Other Religion; Peace and Conflict Studies; Place and Environment; Race and Ethnicity; Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Paz, A. (2016). The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2476 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000249 ; FIDC000249

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Paz, Anthony. “The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence.” 2016. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed April 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2476 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000249 ; FIDC000249.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Paz, Anthony. “The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence.” 2016. Web. 08 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Paz A. The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2016. [cited 2020 Apr 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2476 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000249 ; FIDC000249.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Paz A. The Tensions of Karma and Ahimsa: Jain Ethics, Capitalism, and Slow Violence. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2476 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000249 ; FIDC000249

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Florida International University

2. Do Monte, Karyna. Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex.

Degree: MA, Religious Studies, 2009, Florida International University

The present paper analyzes a case study of the Madeira Complex, which plans to build two massive dams on the Amazon River's largest tributary, to identify religious discourse in ecological debates. Three sides of the debate are investigated in order to analyze the various perspectives of proper human relations with the rest of nature that emerge. The Brazilian government and large corporations support the project as a necessary step to meet future national energy needs, the indigenous groups settled in federal territories that are directly affected by the environmental impact of the project and have mixed opinions, and environmentalist organizations starkly opposed to the project because of its impact on the environment. Each perspective reflects a Christian model of stewardship, where humans are responsible for the management of the rest of nature, and even the indigenous worldview adapts this dominant perspective in order to gain visibility in the debate. This debate reveals how the stewardship model can be a subtle form of neo-colonization of indigenous people and of ecosystems. Advisors/Committee Members: Whitney Bauman, Oren B. Stier, Christine E. Gudorf.

Subjects/Keywords: Latin American Languages and Societies; Religion

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Do Monte, K. (2009). Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3067 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15101204 ; FI15101204

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Do Monte, Karyna. “Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex.” 2009. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed April 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3067 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15101204 ; FI15101204.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Do Monte, Karyna. “Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex.” 2009. Web. 08 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Do Monte K. Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2009. [cited 2020 Apr 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3067 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15101204 ; FI15101204.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Do Monte K. Environmental stewardship and the fate of the Brazilian Amazon : a case study of the Madeira Complex. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2009. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3067 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15101204 ; FI15101204

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

3. Haase, Donald. Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts.

Degree: MA, Religious Studies, 2018, Florida International University

This thesis examines a specific type of instance that bridges the divide between seeing sacred texts as merely vehicles for content and as objects themselves: self-reference. Doing so yielded a heuristic system of categories of self-reference in sacred texts based on the way the text self-describes: Inlibration, Necessity, and Untranslatability. I provide examples of these self-referential features as found in various sacred texts: the Vedas, Āgamas, Papyrus of Ani, Torah, Quran, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, and the Book of Mormon. I then examine how different theories of sacredness interact with them. What do Durkheim, Otto, Freud, or Levinas say about these? How are their theories changed when confronted with sacred texts as objects as well as containers for content? I conclude by asserting that these self-referential features can be seen as ‘self-sacralizing’ in that they: match understandings of sacredness, speak for themselves, and do not occur in mundane texts. Advisors/Committee Members: Oren B. Stier, Whitney Bauman, Steven M. Vose.

Subjects/Keywords: Hermeneutics; Religious Literature; Sacred Texts; Scripture; Translation; Literacy Theory; Religious Studies; Textual Criticism; Material Culture; Comparative Literature; Comparative Methodologies and Theories; Continental Philosophy; History of Religion; Jewish Studies; Other Anthropology; Other Religion; Reading and Language; Rhetoric and Composition; Sociology of Religion; Theory and Philosophy; Translation Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haase, D. (2018). Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3726 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006911 ; FIDC006911

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haase, Donald. “Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts.” 2018. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed April 08, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3726 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006911 ; FIDC006911.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haase, Donald. “Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts.” 2018. Web. 08 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Haase D. Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 08]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3726 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006911 ; FIDC006911.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Haase D. Self-Referential Features in Sacred Texts. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3726 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006911 ; FIDC006911

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.