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You searched for +publisher:"Florida International University" +contributor:("Norma Goonen"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida International University

1. Clovis, Meghan A. An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education, 2018, Florida International University

Enrollment in degree-granting postsecondary institutions in the U.S. is increasing, as are the numbers of students entering academically underprepared. Students in remedial mathematics represent the largest percentage of total enrollment in remedial courses, and national statistics indicate that less than half of these students pass all of the remedial math courses in which they enroll. In response to the low pass rates, numerous studies have been conducted into the use of alternative modes of instruction to increase passing rates. Despite myriad studies into course redesign, passing rates have seen no large-scale improvement. Lacking is a thorough investigation into preexisting differences between students who do and do not take remedial math. My study examined the effect of taking remedial math courses in college on degree attainment and college GPA using a subsample of the Educational Longitudinal Study of 2002. This nonexperimental study examined preexisting differences between students who did and did not take remedial math. The study incorporated propensity score matching, a statistical analysis not commonly used in educational research, to create comparison groups of matched students using multiple covariate measures. Missing value analyses and multiple imputation procedures were also incorporated as methods for identifying and handling missing data. Analyses were conducted on both matched and unmatched groups, as well as on 12 multiply imputed data sets. Binary logistic regression analyses showed that preexisting differences between students on academic, nonacademic, and non-cognitive measures significantly predicted remedial math-taking in college. Binary logistic regression analyses also indicated that students who did not take remedial math courses in college were 1.5 times more likely to earn a degree than students who took remedial math. Linear regression analyses showed that taking remedial math had a significant negative effect on mean college GPA. Students who did not take remedial math had a higher mean GPA than students who did take remedial math. These results were consistent across unmatched groups, matched groups, and all 12 multiply imputed data sets. Advisors/Committee Members: Mido Chang, Benjamin Baez, Norma Goonen, George O'Brien.

Subjects/Keywords: Remedial Math; Degree Attainment; College GPA; Propensity Score Matching; Imputation; Education; Educational Assessment, Evaluation, and Research; Higher Education; Longitudinal Data Analysis and Time Series; Multivariate Analysis; Other Education; Secondary Education

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APA (6th Edition):

Clovis, M. A. (2018). An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3573 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006525 ; FIDC006525

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clovis, Meghan A. “An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed April 10, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3573 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006525 ; FIDC006525.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clovis, Meghan A. “An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching.” 2018. Web. 10 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Clovis MA. An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. [cited 2020 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3573 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006525 ; FIDC006525.

Council of Science Editors:

Clovis MA. An Investigation of the Effects of Taking Remedial Math in College on Degree Attainment and College GPA Using Multiple Imputation and Propensity Score Matching. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3573 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC006525 ; FIDC006525


Florida International University

2. Williams, Nashira. Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community.

Degree: PhD, Higher Education, 2019, Florida International University

Studies explain that participating in community service enhances relationships, positively contributes to one’s purpose, and provides life satisfaction with a specific focus on retention and degree attainment for those enrolled in college (Corporation for National and Community Service, 2007). The simultaneous increase of Black women attending colleges as universities increase outreach to drive community engagement does not align with the shift in the research of civic engagement that excludes the activity of young Black people and is counterintuitive to the historical underpinnings of political and educational transformations in the United States (e.g., Civil Rights Movement) (Hewins-Maroney, 2008). The purpose of this study is to gain a better understanding of why current Black undergraduate women volunteer in their communities and how they perceive these volunteer experiences reflect on understanding themselves as Black women. Qualitative inquiry was used to explore the similarities and differences of how Black women make meaning of their experiences and understand themselves. The 11 Black undergraduate women who participated revealed eight themes that contributed to their reason for serving their communities. Overwhelmingly, the participants felt a drive, usually before college, that motivated them to serve their communities to impact themselves and others in transformative ways. Their work in the community was not without hardships or barriers, but overcoming those barriers were also motivating to the participants to recognize their privilege and continue to serve. The university’s role is something the participants were critical about as they had little connection to the university related to volunteering except for the marketing of service opportunities but contributed that to their peers. As the institutionalization of service-learning and volunteerism in higher education has become a strategy to increase retention, the findings from the present study add to the limited research of volunteer engagement of diverse populations. The participants shared their criticism of volunteering within the university as well as the community broadly, and they confirm that intentional outreach and educational spaces should be dedicated to ensuring that the community work of students of all backgrounds is valued and that these students be given opportunities to engage in meaningful volunteer work. Advisors/Committee Members: Benjamin Baez, Valerie Patterson, Maria Lovett, Norma Goonen.

Subjects/Keywords: Higher education; Higher Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Williams, N. (2019). Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3964 ; FIDC007682

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Williams, Nashira. “Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed April 10, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3964 ; FIDC007682.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Williams, Nashira. “Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community.” 2019. Web. 10 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Williams N. Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2019. [cited 2020 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3964 ; FIDC007682.

Council of Science Editors:

Williams N. Why Black Collegiate Women Volunteer: A Perspective on Meaning Making through Service with the Community. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2019. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3964 ; FIDC007682


Florida International University

3. Vincent-Robinson, Carleen. Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students.

Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD), Higher Education, 2016, Florida International University

As university faculty are often required to police academic misconduct among students, their attitudes and beliefs toward misconduct warrant investigation, particularly as the failure to act may exacerbate the incidence of students’ unethical behaviors. Therefore, this descriptive study examined faculty perceptions of academic dishonesty among students, institutional support, and self-plagiarism using an electronic-mail questionnaire (N = 201) and assessed the academic environment, frequency of student misconduct, and severity of those behaviors. Female faculty were more likely than male faculty to perceive high levels of cheating on exams (pppppppppp Additionally, online faculty were more likely than campus-based faculty to perceive higher levels of plagiarism among graduate students (p p Multi-way frequency analyses revealed significant interactions between the perceptions concerning academic integrity policies, institutional support, and understanding of self-plagiarism, thereby, resulting in the rejection of the three null hypotheses of no association. Overall, faculty remain troubled by self-plagiarism; their perceptions are mediated by gender and academic rank. Consequently, additional efforts should be made to educate instructional staff about the various forms of academic dishonesty including, but not limited to, self-plagiarism, double-dipping, and recycling; increase faculty understanding and awareness of misconduct; and encourage compliance with said policies. Advisors/Committee Members: Benjamin Baez, Mido Chang, Eric Dwyer, Norma Goonen.

Subjects/Keywords: Academic Dishonesty; Cheating; Plagiarism; University; Faculty; Perceptions; Education; Higher Education; Online and Distance Education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vincent-Robinson, C. (2016). Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2501 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000226 ; FIDC000226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vincent-Robinson, Carleen. “Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students.” 2016. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed April 10, 2020. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2501 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000226 ; FIDC000226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vincent-Robinson, Carleen. “Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students.” 2016. Web. 10 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Vincent-Robinson C. Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2016. [cited 2020 Apr 10]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2501 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000226 ; FIDC000226.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vincent-Robinson C. Faculty Perceptions of Self-Plagiarism and Other Forms of Academic Dishonesty Among University Students. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2016. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2501 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000226 ; FIDC000226

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.