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You searched for +publisher:"Florida International University" +contributor:("Kaz Miyagiwa"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida International University

1. Tu, Qingru. International Trade and Environmental Regulation.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2018, Florida International University

This dissertation is composed of three chapters regarding international trade and environmental regulation. The first chapter focuses on the relationship between port ownership and the port R\&D investment. I investigate whether a larger degree of private involvement in the port sector makes for a higher level of welfare, as well as an improvement in port performance. I establish the stage games to analyze the reciprocal international trade. The theoretical findings indicate that the endowment of population plays an essential role in choosing the optimal port ownership. In the second chapter, I investigate the effect of port pollution regulation on port ownership. I incorporate the regulation tax on emissions from port cargo handling into the international duopoly trade model. The results of the stage games suggest the same ownership of the ports in both countries. I also extend the categories of port structures to include the transfer of port ownership to the other country. The policy implication is to have the small country own both ports, which is opposite to the port governance in reality. In the third chapter, I explore the equilibrium port ownership structures without other policy issues or regulation on the port sector being considered. The influence of country size per se suggests that a small country should privatize its port in the context of a privatized port in the large country. For a large country, it is better to choose a type of ownership different from the small country's. In addition, it is the country whose population is greater than a third of the scale in the other country that should own both ports. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaz Miyagiwa, Cem Karayalcin, Jesse Bull, Mahadev Bhat.

Subjects/Keywords: International Trade; Port Ownership; Port Privatization; Economic Theory; Environmental Studies; International Economics

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APA (6th Edition):

Tu, Q. (2018). International Trade and Environmental Regulation. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3727 ; FIDC006909

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tu, Qingru. “International Trade and Environmental Regulation.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed March 25, 2019. https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3727 ; FIDC006909.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tu, Qingru. “International Trade and Environmental Regulation.” 2018. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Tu Q. International Trade and Environmental Regulation. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3727 ; FIDC006909.

Council of Science Editors:

Tu Q. International Trade and Environmental Regulation. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2018. Available from: https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/3727 ; FIDC006909


Florida International University

2. Wang, Feifei. Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2016, Florida International University

This dissertation investigates the factors that firms take into consideration when they decide in which manner to expand internationally (i.e. foreign direct investment and international trade). Another component of the investigation focuses on what types of firms benefit the most and what are the associated benefits with expanding internationally. I investigate self-selection and learning-by-exporting hypothesis by applying matched sampling techniques and non-structural econometric models. Using a Chinese firm-level dataset, I find that firms that start exporting are more productive than non-exporting ones. Additionally, in most industries exporters become more productive in time. I then investigate how income inequality leads firms to make different choices on how they expand internationally. I develop a simple theoretical model by carefully choosing a mean-preserving income distribution. I find that changing the mean-preserving parameter of the income distribution affects market demand for firms' products and firms' choosing of strategies for international expansion. Some, but not all firms gain market shares due to larger market size caused by the more concentrated income distribution around the mean. Using Gini coefficient as the proxy for income distribution, I demonstrate empirically that some firms gain market shares and benefit from more consumers becoming part of the middle class due to the corresponding change in income distribution. I also study the aggregate implication of opening the economy in a two-country Dynamic Stochastic Equilibrium in which firms have heterogeneous productivity in the spirit of Melitz (2003). I show that benefits incurred by international engagement are not equally distributed among firms. I separate firms into four categories based on their productivity levels. The highest productivity firms gain the most by breaking into a new market as multinationals. The second highest productivity firms become exporters and obtain the second largest market share. The third highest productivity firms only serve the domestic market, while the lowest productivity firms exit the market. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaz Miyagiwa, Qiang Kang, Sheng Guo, Mihaela Pintea.

Subjects/Keywords: International Trade; FDI; Income Distribution.; Economics

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APA (6th Edition):

Wang, F. (2016). Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2545 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000691 ; FIDC000691

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wang, Feifei. “Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2545 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000691 ; FIDC000691.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wang, Feifei. “Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms.” 2016. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wang F. Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2545 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000691 ; FIDC000691.

Council of Science Editors:

Wang F. Income Distribution, International Trade and Foreign Direct Investment with Heterogeneous Firms. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2016. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/2545 ; 10.25148/etd.FIDC000691 ; FIDC000691

3. Wan, Jiangyun. Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry.

Degree: PhD, Economics, 2015, Florida International University

Chapter 1: Patents and Entry Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry: The Role of Marketing Exclusivity Effective patent length for innovation drugs is severely curtailed because of extensive efficacy and safety tests required for FDA approval, raising concern over adequacy of incentives for new drug development. The Hatch-Waxman Act extends patent length for new drugs by five years, but also promotes generic entry by simplifying approval procedures and granting 180-day marketing exclusivity to a first generic entrant before the patent expires. In this paper we present a dynamic model to examine the effect of marketing exclusivity. We find that marketing exclusivity may be redundant and its removal may increase generic firms' profits and social welfare. Chapter 2: Why Authorized Generics?: Theoretical and Empirical Investigations Facing generic competition, the brand-name companies some-times launch generic versions themselves called authorized generics. This practice is puzzling. If it is cannibalization, it cannot be profitable. If it is divisionalization, it should be practiced always instead of sometimes. I explain this phenomenon in terms of switching costs in a model in which the incumbent first develops a customer base to ready itself against generic competition later. I show that only sufficiently low switching costs or large market size justifies launch of AGs. I then use prescription drug data to test those results and find support. Chapter 3: The Merger Paradox and R&D Oligopoly theory says that merger is unprofitable, unless a majority of firms in industry merge. Here, we introduce R&D opportunities to resolve this so-called merger paradox. We have three results. First, when there is one R&D firm, that firm can profitably merge with any number of non-R&D firms. Second, with multiple R&D firms and multiple non-R&D firms, all R&D firms can profitably merge. Third, with two R&D firms and two non-R&D firms, each R&D firms prefer to merge with a non-R&D firm. With three or more than non-R&D firms, however, the R&D firms prefer to merge with each other. Advisors/Committee Members: Kaz Miyagiwa, Cem Karayalcin, Timothy Page, Mira Wilkins.

Subjects/Keywords: generic entry competition; switching cost; merger paradox; Hatch-Waxman Act; pharmaceutical industry; authorized generics; innovation; Econometrics; Health Economics; Industrial Organization

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wan, J. (2015). Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry. (Doctoral Dissertation). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1900 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032133 ; FI15032133

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wan, Jiangyun. “Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Florida International University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1900 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032133 ; FI15032133.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wan, Jiangyun. “Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry.” 2015. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Wan J. Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Florida International University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1900 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032133 ; FI15032133.

Council of Science Editors:

Wan J. Essays on Competition in the Pharmaceutical Industry. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Florida International University; 2015. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1900 ; 10.25148/etd.FI15032133 ; FI15032133

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