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You searched for +publisher:"Florida International University" +contributor:("Irma Becerra-Fernandez"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Florida International University

1. Rocha, Jose. A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance.

Degree: Management Information Systems, 2011, Florida International University

Each disaster presents itself with a unique set of characteristics that are hard to determine a priori. Thus disaster management tasks are inherently uncertain, requiring knowledge sharing and quick decision making that involves coordination across different levels and collaborators. While there has been an increasing interest among both researchers and practitioners in utilizing knowledge management to improve disaster management, little research has been reported about how to assess the dynamic nature of disaster management tasks, and what kinds of knowledge sharing are appropriate for different dimensions of task uncertainty characteristics. Using combinations of qualitative and quantitative methods, this research study developed the dimensions and their corresponding measures of the uncertain dynamic characteristics of disaster management tasks and tested the relationships between the various dimensions of uncertain dynamic disaster management tasks and task performance through the moderating and mediating effects of knowledge sharing. Furthermore, this research work conceptualized and assessed task uncertainty along three dimensions: novelty, unanalyzability, and significance; knowledge sharing along two dimensions: knowledge sharing purposes and knowledge sharing mechanisms; and task performance along two dimensions: task effectiveness and task efficiency. Analysis results of survey data collected from Miami-Dade County emergency managers suggested that knowledge sharing purposes and knowledge sharing mechanisms moderate and mediate uncertain dynamic disaster management task and task performance. Implications for research and practice as well directions for future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Irma Becerra-Fernandez, Weidong Xia, Mary Ann Von Glinow, Steve Zanakis.

Subjects/Keywords: Knowledge Management; Knowledge Sharing; Disaster Management; Exploration; Exploitation; Task Performance

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Rocha, J. (2011). A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/468 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11081002 ; FI11081002

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Rocha, Jose. “A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance.” 2011. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/468 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11081002 ; FI11081002.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Rocha, Jose. “A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance.” 2011. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Rocha J. A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/468 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11081002 ; FI11081002.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Rocha J. A Study on Uncertain Dynamic Disaster Management Tasks, Knowledge Sharing, and Task Performance. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/468 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11081002 ; FI11081002

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Florida International University

2. Albornoz, Carlos A. Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study.

Degree: Doctor of Education (EdD), Adult Education and Human Resource Development, 2011, Florida International University

Along with the accumulation of evidence supporting the role of entrepreneurship in economic development (Acs & Armington, 2006; Kuratko, 2005, Reynolds, 2007), governments have persisted in encouraging people to become entrepreneurs (Acs & Stough, 2008; Brannback & Carsrud, 2008). These efforts have tried to reproduce the conditions under which entrepreneurship emerges. One of these conditions is to develop entrepreneurial skills among students and scientists (Fan & Foo, 2004). Entrepreneurship education within higher education has experienced a remarkable expansion in the last 20 years (Green, 2008). To develop entrepreneurial skills among students, scholars have proposed different teaching approaches. However, no clear relationship has been demonstrated between entrepreneurship education, learning outcomes, and business creation (Hostager & Decker, 1999). Despite policy makers demands for more accountability from educational institutions (Klimoski, 2007) and entrepreneurship instructors demands for consistency about what should be taught and how (Maidment, 2009), the appropriate content for entrepreneurship programs remains under constant discussion (Solomon, 2007). Entrepreneurship education is still in its infancy, professors propose diverse teaching goals and radically different teaching methods. This represents an obstacle to development of foundational and consistent curricula across the board (Cone, 2008). Entrepreneurship education is in need of a better conceptualization of the learning outcomes pursued in order to develop consistent curriculum. Many schools do not have enough qualified faculty to meet the growing student demand and a consistent curriculum is needed for faculty development. Entrepreneurship instructors and their teaching practices are of interest because they have a role in producing the entrepreneurs needed to grow the economy. This study was designed to understand instructors’ perspectives and actions related to their teaching. The sample studied consisted of eight college and university entrepreneurship instructors. Cases met predetermined criteria of importance followed maximum variation strategies. Results suggest that teaching content were consistent across participants while different teaching goals were identified: some instructors inspire and develop general skills of students while others envision the creation of a real business as the major outcome of their course. A relationship between methods reported by instructors and their disciplinary background, teaching perspective, and entrepreneurial experience was found. Advisors/Committee Members: Tonette S. Rocco, Alan L. Carsrud, Delia C. Garcia, Irma Becerra-Fernandez, Thomas G. Reio Jr..

Subjects/Keywords: entrepreneurship education; adult education

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Albornoz, C. A. (2011). Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/542 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120913 ; FI11120913

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Albornoz, Carlos A. “Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study.” 2011. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/542 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120913 ; FI11120913.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Albornoz, Carlos A. “Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study.” 2011. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Albornoz CA. Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/542 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120913 ; FI11120913.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Albornoz CA. Exploring the Goals, Content, and Methods of Entrepreneurship Professors: A Multiple Case Study. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2011. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/542 ; 10.25148/etd.FI11120913 ; FI11120913

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Florida International University

3. Gudi, Arvind. Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations.

Degree: Business Administration, 2008, Florida International University

Natural and man-made disasters have gained attention at all levels of policy-making in recent years. Emergency management tasks are inherently complex and unpredictable, and often require coordination among multiple organizations across different levels and locations. Effectively managing various knowledge areas and the organizations involved has become a critical emergency management success factor. However, there is a general lack of understanding about how to describe and assess the complex nature of emergency management tasks and how knowledge integration can help managers improve emergency management task performance. The purpose of this exploratory research was first, to understand how emergency management operations are impacted by tasks that are complex and inter-organizational and second, to investigate how knowledge integration as a particular knowledge management strategy can improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the emergency tasks. Three types of specific knowledge were considered: context-specific, technology-specific, and context-and-technology-specific. The research setting was the Miami-Dade Emergency Operations Center (EOC) and the study was based on the survey responses from the participants in past EOC activations related to their emergency tasks and knowledge areas. The data included task attributes related to complexity, knowledge area, knowledge integration, specificity of knowledge, and task performance. The data was analyzed using multiple linear regressions and path analyses, to (1) examine the relationships between task complexity, knowledge integration, and performance, (2) the moderating effects of each type of specific knowledge on the relationship between task complexity and performance, and (3) the mediating role of knowledge integration. As per theory-based propositions, the results indicated that overall component complexity and interactive complexity tend to have a negative effect on task performance. But surprisingly, procedural rigidity tended to have a positive effect on performance in emergency management tasks. Also as per our expectation, knowledge integration had a positive relationship with task performance. Interestingly, the moderating effects of each type of specific knowledge on the relationship between task complexity and performance were varied and the extent of mediation of knowledge integration depended on the dimension of task complexity. Advisors/Committee Members: Irma Becerra-Fernandez, Ronald Lee, Shahid Hamid, Weidong Xia.

Subjects/Keywords: effective knowledge integration; emergency management

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gudi, A. (2008). Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations. (Thesis). Florida International University. Retrieved from http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/203 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10022518 ; FI10022518

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gudi, Arvind. “Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations.” 2008. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed March 18, 2019. http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/203 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10022518 ; FI10022518.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gudi, Arvind. “Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations.” 2008. Web. 18 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Gudi A. Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations. [Internet] [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2008. [cited 2019 Mar 18]. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/203 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10022518 ; FI10022518.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Gudi A. Effective Knowledge Integration in Emergency Response Organizations. [Thesis]. Florida International University; 2008. Available from: http://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/203 ; 10.25148/etd.FI10022518 ; FI10022518

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.