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You searched for +publisher:"Eastern Michigan University" +contributor:("Kristin Judd, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Eastern Michigan University

1. Sander, Bianca Jean. Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2016, Eastern Michigan University

The objective of this observational study was to determine if there was a difference in aquatic invertebrate communities between areas dominated by Phragmites australis and areas dominated by Typha spp. in a freshwater coastal marsh. The hypothesis was that aquatic invertebrate diversity and abundance would be greater in Typha-dominated locations as opposed to Phragmites-dominated locations. Sampling took place at Lake Erie Metropark in southeast Michigan during the summer of 2013. Invertebrates were collected using Hester-Dendy samplers and identified in the laboratory. Invertebrates were assessed using the Shannon-Wiener Index, taxon richness, and abundance values which were all analyzed using t-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Invertebrate community structure was analyzed using principal component analysis (PCA) and multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was used to compare factor scores. Environmental variables of water temperature, pH, dissolved oxygen concentration, and percent dissolved oxygen saturation were measured and analyzed using repeated measures analysis of variance and Spearman correlations. There was no significant difference in invertebrate richness or diversity (p>0.05), nor were there any significant differences in the abundance of individual invertebrate taxa between the two plant types (p>0.05), except for Helobdella modesta, which was significantly more abundant in Typha-dominated areas (p70% of total variance in community structure in the first two factors (55.4% and 15.6%, respectively). Plotted sites on PCA axes showed no grouping patterns with respect to dominant plant species, suggesting invertebrate communities were not different based on plant type, and MANOVA confirmed the lack of groupings based on plant type (p>0.05). PCA suggested three groupings of invertebrate taxa which occurred together frequently. In regards to invertebrate functional feeding groups (FFG), there were no significant differences in mean FFG abundance based on plant type (p always >0.05), except for the predator group, which was statistically greater at Typha sites (p80% of total variance in community structure in the first two factors (46.1% and 34.3%, respectively). Plotted sites on PCA axes showed no grouping patterns based on plant type, suggesting FFGs were not different based on plant type, and MANOVA confirmed the lack of groupings (p>0.05). In conclusion, these findings suggest that freshwater Phragmites and Typha marshes are equally capable of supporting abundant and diverse aquatic invertebrate communities. Advisors/Committee Members: Steven Francoeur, Ph.D., Chair, Kristin Judd, Ph.D., Ulrich Reinhardt, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Invertebrates; Lake Erie; Phragmites; Typha; Biology

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APA (6th Edition):

Sander, B. J. (2016). Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/672

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sander, Bianca Jean. “Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/672.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sander, Bianca Jean. “Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes.” 2016. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Sander BJ. Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/672.

Council of Science Editors:

Sander BJ. Lake Erie coastal marsh aquatic invertebrate community structure across habitats dominated by two different emergent macrophytes. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/672


Eastern Michigan University

2. Bull, Daniela. Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan.

Degree: MS, Biology, 2015, Eastern Michigan University

Beach fouling is a problem in the Great Lakes. We surveyed beaches along the southwestern shore of Saginaw Bay to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling (muck), muck composition, and any relationship between muck accrual and weather conditions. Muck deposition was greater towards the end of the growing season. The Bay City Recreation Area (BCRA) had the highest frequency of muck presence. BCRA muck depth was much greater in 2010 and 2011 than in 2012 and 2013. No sites differed in muck depth in 2012, but in 2013 the two southernmost sites tended to have greater muck depth. BCRA muck composition differed from that of all other sites. Southern sites had the higher percentages of amorphous material, while the northern sites had more fresh algae. There were no simple patterns between muck deposition and weather conditions. A combination of factors may be required to accurately predict muck deposition events. Advisors/Committee Members: Steven Francoeur, Ph.D., Chair, Gary Hannan, Ph.D., Kristin Judd, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Algae; Beach Fouling; Cladophora; Great Lakes; Muck; Saginaw Bay; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bull, D. (2015). Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/708

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bull, Daniela. “Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/708.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bull, Daniela. “Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan.” 2015. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Bull D. Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/708.

Council of Science Editors:

Bull D. Spatial and temporal distribution of beach fouling in Saginaw Bay, Michigan. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/708

3. Tornquist, Reid Jeffrey. Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>).

Degree: MS, Biology, 2014, Eastern Michigan University

Carnivorous pitcher plants trap insects in cone-shaped leaves and digest them to gain vital nutrients. For digestion to occur, plants in the genus Sarracenia require mutualistic microorganisms living in their leaves. Few studies have examined how these communities change over time. This study specifically examines the bacterial composition in the most widely distributed species, Sarracenia purpurea, in the winter. The leaves of this plant species live for several years, and it is unknown whether microbes overwinter in pitcher fluid or if community structure must be reestablished each spring. This study aims to characterize the winter microbiome in two population of Sarracenia collected between the months of November 2012 and January 2014 in two different ways: DNA from the fluid of 57 pitchers in one population was extracted and amplified using ARISA-PCR, and metabolic substrate usage was measured in 36 pitchers in two populations. Bacteria from eight phyla were recovered. The number of unique genera identified within one leaf ranged from 27-60, and the number of unique phylotypes per sample ranged from 59-186. Metabolic usage dropped drastically from summer/fall levels in December, only to rebound in January. Results indicate a large, diverse, and dynamic community of microbes present throughout the winter that are capable of using a wide variety of carbon substrates. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Maggie Hanes, Ph.D., Chair, Dr. Daniel Clemans, Ph.D., Dr. Kristin Judd, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: carnivorous plants; plant-microbe relationships; Biology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tornquist, R. J. (2014). Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>). (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/585

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tornquist, Reid Jeffrey. “Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>).” 2014. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 25, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/585.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tornquist, Reid Jeffrey. “Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>).” 2014. Web. 25 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Tornquist RJ. Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>). [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2014. [cited 2019 Mar 25]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/585.

Council of Science Editors:

Tornquist RJ. Characterization of winter microbial communities in the purple pitcher plant (<i>sarracenia purpurea</i>). [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2014. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/585

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