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You searched for +publisher:"Eastern Michigan University" +contributor:("James Todd, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Eastern Michigan University

1. Stanton, Cory. Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2016, Eastern Michigan University

Depression is recognized as a substantial contributor to the global burden of disease, as well as economic productivity. Behavioral activation has been shown to be an efficacious treatment for depression, drawing on the work of early behavioral theorists and research on the quantitative matching law. Recently, scholars have called for increased theoretical rigor in conceptualizing psychological health, as well as increased conceptual and methodological dialogue between basic and applied researchers. The present study examined the validity of a novel self-report measure of time allocation, an extension of the matching law. A cross-sectional sample of 204 undergraduate psychology students completed measures of behavioral and emotional health in addition to the time allocation task. The task asked participants to report their time spent engaging in meaningful activities, managing life's negatives, and sleeping. It also asked participants to subjectively rate their experience of these life areas on a 1-10 scale. Pearson correlations, multiple regression analyses, and one-way ANOVA were used to evaluate the convergent, discriminant, and predictive validity of the time allocation task. Approximately half of the expected Pearson correlations were significant. Questions related to the quality or effectiveness of allocated time had stronger relationships with conventional and behavioral measures of depression than the time questions, a finding that was not expected. Average time spent managing life's negatives, as well as the subjective quality ratings of all three areas of time, were significant in differentiating depression severity groups. The overall time allocation task demonstrated some predictive validity, but did not show incremental validity when other constructs were controlled for. Strengths and weaknesses of the project, as well as implications for clinical behavioral process research, are discussed in the conclusion. Advisors/Committee Members: Thomas Waltz, Ph.D., Chair, Flora Hoodin, Ph.D., James Todd, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Mental health; depression; time management; values; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Stanton, C. (2016). Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/673

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stanton, Cory. “Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/673.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stanton, Cory. “Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation.” 2016. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Stanton C. Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/673.

Council of Science Editors:

Stanton C. Where does the time go? An investigation of self-reported time allocation. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2016. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/673

2. Kowalkowski, Jennifer D. The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, Eastern Michigan University

Parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder face significant stressors and challenges; however, little research has investigated ways to effectively address their psychological distress and adjustment issues. This study used a between-subject and withinsubject repeated measures design to test the effects of an 8-week Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) or treatment as usual (TAU) group. Treatment completers included 13 mothers in the ACT condition and 4 mothers in TAU. They were assessed three weeks before the intervention, one week after, and three months post-intervention. Limited data for between-group comparison demonstrated only a significant difference on the frequency scale of the Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ), in which frequency of automatic thoughts increased for mothers in the TAU condition. For mothers in the ACT condition only, repeated measures ANOVAs revealed significant decreases from baseline to post-intervention on the Parental Distress Index of the Parental Stress Index-Short Form. Baseline to post-intervention decreases were seen for the GSI of the Brief Symptom Inventory-18 (BSI-18), with some regression to baseline at follow-up but overall reductions maintained. Similar significant findings were also demonstrated with increases in the Positive Aspects of Caregiving and decreases in the ATQ total score and the believability scale. No statistically significant changes were seen on the Depression Index of BSI-18, the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II, or the Five Facets of Mindfulness Questionnaire. In exploratory analysis, experiential avoidance correlated positively with multiple scales of a selfadministered measure of executive functioning, including a measure of one’s ability to shift attention rapidly. Additionally, mothers who reported significantly greater levels of externalizing problem behaviors also reported significantly higher degrees of parental distress. This research suggests that an ACT-based treatment delivered in group format may be of assistance in helping parents better adjust to the difficulties in raising children with autism. Advisors/Committee Members: James Todd, Ph.D., Chair, Tamara Loverich, Ph.D., Renee Lajiness-O’Neill, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Acceptance and commitment therapy; autism; cognitive therapy; intervention; Clinical Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kowalkowski, J. D. (2012). The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. (Doctoral Dissertation). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/512

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kowalkowski, Jennifer D. “The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/512.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kowalkowski, Jennifer D. “The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder.” 2012. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Kowalkowski JD. The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2012. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/512.

Council of Science Editors:

Kowalkowski JD. The impact of a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy intervention on parents of children diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2012. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/512

3. Eluri, Zina Ameed. Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2013, Eastern Michigan University

Behavior excesses are a key feature in many psychiatric diagnoses. Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), in particular, is almost entirely defined in terms of behavior excesses. Although much research has been conducted on OCD treatment, very little research has focused on understanding how these compulsive behaviors are acquired. The few theories advanced to explain the etiology of OCD compulsions have significant limitations. The purpose of this study is to test social facilitation as a potential mechanism through which compulsive behaviors are acquired, via an animal model. Schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) was employed as the behavior of interest because there is empirical support indicating it as an animal model of compulsive behavior. The fundamental issue was to determine if naïve rats exposed to rats that drank reliably would (1) show elevated rates of drinking as a result of the exposure, and then (2) acquire SIP more rapidly than rats without that exposure. Twenty-four male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly designated to be (1) drinking model rats, (2) drinking naïve rats, (3) feeding control model rats, (4)feeding control naïve rats, (5) social contact control model rats, (6) social contact control naïve rats, and (7) naïve control rats. SIP was established in the drinking model rats using a fixed-time 60-second schedule of food delivery (FT-60) with water available. Once stable drinking occurred, the models and their matched naïve rat were placed in the same experimental chamber to determine if drinking in the naïve rat would be socially facilitated. Strong individual differences in drinking by the naïve rats were observed. However, the overall indications were that social facilitation may play a role in enhancing the acquisition of SIP and that social facilitation may be a factor in the development of compulsive behavior. Advisors/Committee Members: James Todd, Ph.D., Chair, Kenneth Rusiniak, Ph.D., Renee Lajiness-O'Neill, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: OCD; polydipsia; group facilitation; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Eluri, Z. A. (2013). Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior. (Doctoral Dissertation). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/478

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eluri, Zina Ameed. “Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 24, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/478.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eluri, Zina Ameed. “Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior.” 2013. Web. 24 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Eluri ZA. Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2013. [cited 2019 Mar 24]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/478.

Council of Science Editors:

Eluri ZA. Social facilitation of polydipsia as an animal model of compulsive behavior. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2013. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/478

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