Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Eastern Michigan University" +contributor:("Irwin Martin, Ph.D., Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Eastern Michigan University

1. Garapati, Kishore. College student understanding of informed consent terminology.

Degree: MS, Health Sciences, 2015, Eastern Michigan University

A good, understandable informed consent form (ICF) is key to ethical medical research, and the ICF is necessary according to United States federal regulation. Since they may be written in complex technical language, ICFs are often difficult for subjects to understand. The purpose of this research was to evaluate students' understanding of terminology commonly used in the ICF. An online research survey was sent to active students of Eastern Michigan University (EMU) during the winter 2015 semester. Questions were asked to evaluate the students' understanding of the correct meaning of the terms used in medical research. The majority of students understood common terminology used in informed consents, but they were confused about the meaning of the term "Clinical Research/Trial" and the location where the clinical studies were conducted. Therefore, investigators and Institutional Review Boards (IRBs) need to be aware of these potentially confusing items when writing an ICF. Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin Martin, Ph.D., Chair, Stephen Sonstein, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: informed consent form; ethical medical research; terminology; medical research; Bioethics and Medical Ethics; Investigative Techniques

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Garapati, K. (2015). College student understanding of informed consent terminology. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/627

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Garapati, Kishore. “College student understanding of informed consent terminology.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed August 14, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/627.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Garapati, Kishore. “College student understanding of informed consent terminology.” 2015. Web. 14 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Garapati K. College student understanding of informed consent terminology. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 14]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/627.

Council of Science Editors:

Garapati K. College student understanding of informed consent terminology. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/627


Eastern Michigan University

2. Balachandran, Soumya. Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials.

Degree: MS, Health Sciences, 2018, Eastern Michigan University

Effective recruitment is key to any clinical trial success. Recruitment of Generation Y (18-34 years old) is quite challenging as they seem to be the least willing group to participate in a clinical trial. The purpose of this study was to find methods that are most appropriate for recruiting the 18-to 34-year-old (Generation Y) subgroup. To capture this information, an online survey was sent to over 2,000 graduate and undergraduate students. Through this survey, information was gathered regarding participant’s willingness to participate in a clinical trial and their preferred recruitment methods. The possible recruitment methods included newspaper advertising, news websites, television (TV) advertising, radio advertising, and social media. Of social media, the options were LinkedIn, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, or other (if none of the above). Of the 2,000 university addresses, 61 students in the age group 18-34 years completed the survey. The most preferred recruitment method was newspaper advertising, news website, and social media as compared to television or radio advertising. Across social media platforms, the preferred recruitment method of recruitment was Facebook. Among the respondents, undergraduate students were more willing to participate in a clinical trial than graduate students. Participant’s age, ethnicity, and academic major had no impact on their willingness to participate and their choice of recruitment method. Overall, the results indicate that the newspaper advertising, news websites, and social media (Facebook) were preferred methods to recruit this age group. The results of this study are tentative due to the small sample size and low response rate. Future studies will be required to definitively address this question. Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin Martin, Ph.D., Chair, Jean Rowan, M.D., M.S..

Subjects/Keywords: Medicine and Health Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Balachandran, S. (2018). Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/894

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Balachandran, Soumya. “Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed August 14, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/894.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Balachandran, Soumya. “Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials.” 2018. Web. 14 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Balachandran S. Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 14]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/894.

Council of Science Editors:

Balachandran S. Recruitment of Generation Y into clinical trials. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2018. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/894


Eastern Michigan University

3. Pathakamudi, Shashikiran. Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials.

Degree: MS, Health Sciences, 2018, Eastern Michigan University

Adolescents and young adults remain underrepresented in clinical trials. Knowledge and perceptions related to clinical research usually determine willingness to participate. During the spring of 2016, an in-class paper survey was conducted to determine whether providing a brief introduction to clinical research would affect the willingness of undergraduate students from the College of Arts and Sciences and the College of Technology at Eastern Michigan University to participate in clinical trials. Some participants received information on clinical research through a short paragraph, and some received no new information, which differentiated the “active” group from the “placebo” group. Overall, both groups provided similar responses to the questions related to understanding and willingness. The majority (> 40%) of responders answered that they had little knowledge. However, only 37% of the active group and 11% of placebo group participants knew that the research was related to humans. Across both groups, nearly 60% of responders expressed willingness to participate in clinical trials. Monetary compensation was the most common motivator, and uncertainty about safety was the most common reason for non-participation in clinical trials. Keywords: clinical trials, participation, willingness Advisors/Committee Members: Irwin Martin, Ph.D., Chair, Jean Rowan, MD, MS.

Subjects/Keywords: clinical trials; participation; willingness; Medicine and Health Sciences

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pathakamudi, S. (2018). Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials. (Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from https://commons.emich.edu/theses/904

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pathakamudi, Shashikiran. “Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials.” 2018. Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed August 14, 2020. https://commons.emich.edu/theses/904.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pathakamudi, Shashikiran. “Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials.” 2018. Web. 14 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Pathakamudi S. Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials. [Internet] [Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 14]. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/904.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Pathakamudi S. Students' understanding about clinical research and their willingness to participate in clinical trials. [Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2018. Available from: https://commons.emich.edu/theses/904

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.