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You searched for +publisher:"Eastern Michigan University" +contributor:("Catherine Peterson, Ph.D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Eastern Michigan University

1. Oswald, Kaitlin. Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2015, Eastern Michigan University

Bimanual coordination is an essential human function requiring efficient interhemispheric communication to produce coordinated movements. Motor deficits affect a variety of clinical populations, yet a complete understanding of bimanual coordination has yet to be achieved. Previous research suggests performance variability depends on the phase demands of the coordinated task and completing bimanual tasks may result in less variability than unimanual tasks, or a bimanual advantage. Also, handedness and musical/athletic experience have also been shown to influence coordinated performance. The present study examined the existence of a bimanual advantage and potential factors influencing coordination in a tapping paradigm. Results indicated that the strong-handed individuals displayed a strong bimanual advantage; whereas, weak-handed participants had a weak bimanual advantage. Variability did not differ by musical/athletic experience. In light of the present findings, relevant studies are needed to gain further insight into bimanual coordination and the underlying processes of motor movement. Advisors/Committee Members: Jin Bo, Ph.D., Chair, Catherine Peterson, Ph.D., Norm Gordon, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: left- and right-handedness; Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Oswald, K. (2015). Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/634

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Oswald, Kaitlin. “Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/634.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Oswald, Kaitlin. “Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness.” 2015. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Oswald K. Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/634.

Council of Science Editors:

Oswald K. Variability in bimanual coordination across the continuum of handedness. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/634


Eastern Michigan University

2. Esposito, Cassandra Lynn. Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2017, Eastern Michigan University

Externalizing behavior problems are highly prevalent in the preschool years. These behaviors are particularly common and problematic among children who are from low-income, minority backgrounds. There is evidence in the literature that describes parental health and parenting problems as risk factors for child externalizing behavior problems. The primary objective of this study was to better understand the relationship between parental health factors, parenting, and child behavior problems. Utilizing data from a low-income African American population, this study examined whether observed measures of parenting behaviors mediated the relationship between measures of parental health (e.g., depression, stress, and BMI) and child externalizing behavior problems. Observed measures of parenting behaviors were collected during three different parent-child interactions (i.e., snack, free play, and clean-up). Results revealed significant positive correlations between parental stress and depression and child externalizing behavior. However, path analyses showed that parental stress was the primary predictor of parental reports of child behavior problems. The current study did not find support for the hypothesis that observed parenting behaviors would mediate the relation between parental health and child behavior. These results, limitations of the present study, and future research directions are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Heather Janisse, Ph.D., Chair, Alissa Huth-Bocks, Ph.D., Catherine Peterson, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: Behavior Problems; Early Childhood; Head Start; Clinical Psychology

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APA (6th Edition):

Esposito, C. L. (2017). Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children. (Doctoral Dissertation). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/744

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Esposito, Cassandra Lynn. “Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/744.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Esposito, Cassandra Lynn. “Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children.” 2017. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Esposito CL. Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2017. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/744.

Council of Science Editors:

Esposito CL. Parental health, parenting behavior and externalizing behavior problems among low-income African American preschool children. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Eastern Michigan University; 2017. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/744

3. Chase, Rachel. Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children.

Degree: MS, Psychology, 2015, Eastern Michigan University

Preschool has been identified as a critical period during which children who are at-risk for school difficulties are most responsive to intervention (National Institute of Mental Health, 2002; National Research Council & Institute of Medicine, 2001). Because of this, school readiness has recently become a prioritized area of interest for the educational system, the health care industry, and the federal government. However, many efforts to comprehensively prepare a child to begin school have not been successful because factors beyond the educational system (e.g., parenting/parent attributes, environmental stressors, and other demographic characteristics) have not been closely considered nor adequately researched. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine if maternal characteristics (e.g., maternal role satisfaction, future orientation, and level of maternal involvement) were positively related to domains of school readiness in children. I hypothesized that higher levels of maternal satisfaction and future orientation would result in more maternal involvement, subsequently leading to higher levels of child school readiness. Participants included 202 low-income, African American mother-child dyads, with the child being preschool age and enrolled in a Head Start program at the time of the study. The current study utilized secondary data where participants were recruited from Head Start facilities in Detroit, Michigan. Hierarchical multiple regression was utilized to test study hypotheses. Results revealed that maternal satisfaction and future orientation was positively related to some domains of child school readiness. The current study did not find support for the mediation hypothesis. Advisors/Committee Members: Heather Janisse, Ph.D., Chair, Catherine Peterson, Ph.D., Stephen Jefferson, Ph.D..

Subjects/Keywords: African American; orientation; preschool children; satisfaction; readiness for school; Psychology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chase, R. (2015). Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children. (Masters Thesis). Eastern Michigan University. Retrieved from http://commons.emich.edu/theses/654

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chase, Rachel. “Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Eastern Michigan University. Accessed March 19, 2019. http://commons.emich.edu/theses/654.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chase, Rachel. “Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children.” 2015. Web. 19 Mar 2019.

Vancouver:

Chase R. Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. [cited 2019 Mar 19]. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/654.

Council of Science Editors:

Chase R. Maternal predictors of school readiness among at-risk Head Start preschool children. [Masters Thesis]. Eastern Michigan University; 2015. Available from: http://commons.emich.edu/theses/654

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