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You searched for +publisher:"Duke University" +contributor:("Jaji, Tsitsi E"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Duke University

1. Panaram, Sasha Ann. The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature .

Degree: 2020, Duke University

“The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women’s Literature” explores renderings of the Middle Passage in literature by African American and Caribbean writers. Departing from the premise that the term “Middle Passage” is insufficient where it concerns describing the massive forced migration that occurred during this trans-Atlantic catastrophe, I look to black women writers in order to build a different vocabulary to depict that which has no beginning, middle, or end; that which is not confined to a narrow strait but whose nomenclature suggests otherwise. Bringing together Caribbeanist philosophical treatises on crossing with the dynamic work in black geography studies and black feminist literary criticism, I argue that black women writers intervene in what has previously been a male dominated field of criticism on the Middle Passage and use their literature to retell Middle Passage stories anew and isolate specific forms of movement such as holding, landing, and crawling, that outlive the period of trans-Atlantic slavery. Across four chapters, this dissertation addresses the challenges of writing about the Middle Passage for which there is no set of identifiable ruins before turning specifically to three works of literature – M. NourbeSe Philip’s Zong! (2008), Paule Marshall’s Praisesong for the Widow (1983), and Toni Morrison’s Beloved (1987). Each of the works I study either recreates or takes inspiration from a historical event that occurred during the Middle Passage or a subsequent crossing such as the 1781 Zong massacre, the 1803 Igbo Landing drowning, and the 1856 infanticide committed by Margaret Garner. Heeding to the motion necessary for this particular trans-Atlantic event ultimately allows us to reckon with what I call “Middle Passages” or “Middle Passings” – the multiple crossings that ensue in the wake of this unparalleled event. Tracing how black women move inevitably reveals where they move to and through putting pressure on the term “middle” that precedes “passage” identifying multiple mid-spaces while also calling for an expansion of critical “sites of slavery” and afterlives of slavery, more generally. Advisors/Committee Members: Jaji, Tsitsi E (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: African American studies; Caribbean studies; Black studies; Black Feminisms; Black Geography Studies; Black Women's Literature; Slavery Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Panaram, S. A. (2020). The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/20932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Panaram, Sasha Ann. “The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature .” 2020. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/20932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Panaram, Sasha Ann. “The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature .” 2020. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Panaram SA. The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2020. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/20932.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Panaram SA. The Space in Between: Middle Passage Movement and Black Women's Literature . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/20932

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Duke University

2. Durham, I. Augustus. Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius .

Degree: 2018, Duke University

This dissertation draws on Sigmund Freud’s essay “Mourning and Melancholia” (1917) to track melancholy and genius in black letters, culture, and history from the nineteenth century to the contemporary moment; it contends that melancholy is a catalyst for genius, and that genius is a signifier of the maternal. Throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, Sigmund Freud prefigures an array of discourses in black studies. One mode of interrogation occurs with relation to his 1917 essay “Mourning and Melancholia”. Some African American literature, such as Richard Wright’s Black Boy, invokes this work indirectly, just as theoretical texts, like Joseph Winters’s Hope Draped in Black: Race, Melancholy, and the Agony of Progress, have direct engagement. Nevertheless, Freud’s attendance to mourning and melancholia is pertinent. He surmises that when the love object dies, mourning does the reparative work of suturing the ego back together after its splitting and impoverishment; melancholia, by contrast, is the “pathological disposition” which occasions such disrepair and instantiates itself through the psychic loss of the love object. In turn, melancholy carries the possibility of devolving into mania such that the one experiencing the psychic loss desires to inflict harm on, while simultaneously becoming, the love object; theorists generally assign this category to the mother. Furthermore, I assert that Freud’s diagnosis of mania reifies long-held and reductive designations when applied to blackness and maternity. My intervention stages a correlation and counterpoint to the above theorizations. Through dissertation chapters in which an overarching thematic juxtaposes itself with each subject of inquiry, I contend that instead of melancholy catalyzing mania—a rendering of the “pathological” for the people in which the dissertation has its investments—, the affect fosters performances of excellence, given the shorthand “genius”. As a form of expression and interpretation in black thought writ large, genius emerges as a response to and in excess of one’s melancholy. This productivity concretizes that genius, not mania, is an affective vestige that is at once reducible and irreducible to the mother; and allows me to journey on a search for her, in myriad iterations, to discover a subject found as opposed to an object lost Advisors/Committee Members: Jaji, Tsitsi E (advisor), Wallace, Maurice O (advisor).

Subjects/Keywords: Black studies; Literature; Aesthetics; affect; blackness; genius; masculinity; maternity; melancholy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Durham, I. A. (2018). Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius . (Thesis). Duke University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16814

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Durham, I Augustus. “Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius .” 2018. Thesis, Duke University. Accessed August 05, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16814.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Durham, I Augustus. “Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius .” 2018. Web. 05 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Durham IA. Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius . [Internet] [Thesis]. Duke University; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 05]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16814.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Durham IA. Stay Black and Die: On Melancholy and Genius . [Thesis]. Duke University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10161/16814

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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