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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Master of Environmental Studies"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Clowes, Lindsay. Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County.

Degree: Master of Environmental Studies, School for Resource & Environmental Studies, 2016, Dalhousie University

As part of an ongoing national research project, this thesis examines the nascent policy regime of food sovereignty, along with global competitiveness and farmland preservation, to gain a better understanding of their influence at the Municipal and Provincial levels of government in Kings County, Nova Scotia. Considering ongoing policy shifts at the Federal, Provincial, and Municipal levels of government, analysis of the Kings County legislative framework exposed the strengths and weaknesses of current policy and legislation in place. The results suggest that conflicting stakeholder opinions, lack of Provincial policy implementation across Municipalities, and inconsistent decisions being made at the Municipal level threaten the future of farmland preservation. Results also indicate that a disconnection between the land base and food sovereignty provides a dilemma for local and Provincial planners. Together, these issues pose a problem for future sustainability of Nova Scotia’s food sovereignty. Advisors/Committee Members: School for Resource & Environmental Studies (department), Master of Environmental Studies (degree), David Connell (external-examiner), Kate Sherran (graduate-coordinator), n/a (thesis-reader), Greg Cameron (thesis-supervisor), Karen Beazley (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), No (manuscripts), No (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Land use; Agriculture; Food Sovereignty; Food security; Farmland; Preservation; Farms

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Clowes, L. (2016). Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71521

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Clowes, Lindsay. “Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71521.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Clowes, Lindsay. “Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County.” 2016. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Clowes L. Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71521.

Council of Science Editors:

Clowes L. Agricultural Land Use Planning in Nova Scotia: A Case Study in Kings County. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71521


Dalhousie University

2. Schut, Laurel. Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?.

Degree: Master of Environmental Studies, School for Resource & Environmental Studies, 2016, Dalhousie University

Insect-mediated pollination is frequently identified as an important ecosystem service to agricultural production. In contrast, ecosystem disservices are rarely considered. Using selective exclusion of early season (wild) versus late season (wild and managed) pollinators, this study explores the potential for early season pollination disservice on commercial lowbush blueberry production (Vaccinium angustifolium). Contrary to the hypothesis of disservice, the results indicate that early season pollinators are important to production; pre-harvest berry drop, shatter, and sugar content were consistent across pollination treatments, even though early season pollinated plots exhibited heavier berries. Ancillary results found that (1) early flowering clones were more productive than late flowering clones, and (2) that shatter was extremely high, outweighing ripe yield. Though a disservice was not identified, it is hoped that this thesis prompts other industries to critically evaluate the alignment (or misalignment) of pollination and harvest that may inadvertently lead to disservice and decreased yields. Advisors/Committee Members: School for Resource & Environmental Studies (department), Master of Environmental Studies (degree), Dr. Kirk Hillier (external-examiner), Dr. Kate Sherren (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Chris Cutler (thesis-reader), Dr. Andony Melathopoulos (thesis-reader), Dr. Peter Tyedmers (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Lowbush blueberry; Agriculture; Ecosystem disservices; Ecosystem services; Pollination

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Schut, L. (2016). Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71639

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Schut, Laurel. “Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71639.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Schut, Laurel. “Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?.” 2016. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Schut L. Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71639.

Council of Science Editors:

Schut L. Is early season pollination to lowbush blueberry an ecosystem service or disservice?. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71639


Dalhousie University

3. Jahncke, Raymond. MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA.

Degree: Master of Environmental Studies, School for Resource & Environmental Studies, 2016, Dalhousie University

Nova Scotia introduced a new wetland policy in 2011 which included a goal to have no net loss of wetlands. In order to meet this goal, the Nova Scotia government has committed to updating the provincial wetland inventory. The objective of this study will be to assess the accuracy of wetland mapping using remote sensing processes based on RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR images, optical imagery, and elevation data. RADARSAT-2 polarimetric SAR images were acquired between 2010 and 2013 over an area southwest of Halifax. Two sources of optical imagery (QuickBird and Landsat 8) and two sources of terrain information (lidar and the provincial government contours) were combined in various arrangements with the radar. A non-parametric supervised Random Forests classifier was applied to the different data combinations. An accuracy assessment showed that using RADARSAT-2 combined with either source of data improved the accuracy of wetland identification over the existing inventory. Advisors/Committee Members: School for Resource & Environmental Studies (department), Master of Environmental Studies (degree), n/a (external-examiner), Kate Sherren (graduate-coordinator), Randy Milton (thesis-reader), Danika van Proosdij (thesis-reader), Peter Tyedmers (thesis-reader), Peter Bush (thesis-supervisor), Peter Duinker (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: wetlands; remote sensing

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jahncke, R. (2016). MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71619

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jahncke, Raymond. “MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed December 15, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71619.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jahncke, Raymond. “MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA.” 2016. Web. 15 Dec 2019.

Vancouver:

Jahncke R. MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. [cited 2019 Dec 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71619.

Council of Science Editors:

Jahncke R. MAPPING WETLANDS IN NOVA SCOTIA WITH MULTI-BEAM RADARSAT-2 POLARIMETRIC SAR, OPTICAL SATELLITE IMAGERY, AND ELEVATION DATA. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/71619

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