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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Louise Carbert"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Coombes, Kendra. Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2013, Dalhousie University

With new medical advances in technology, there has been a push from the legal, medical and political communities to re-examine the policies of end-of-life-care. End-of-life-care (EOLC) is a term that refers to not only a patient’s final hours of life, but also the medical care of individuals with terminal illnesses or conditions that have become advanced and incurable. For the purpose of this paper, I will be referring to physician-assisted death and active euthanasia as forms of end-of-care. The Politics of End-of –Life-Care: Active Euthanasia and Physician-assisted Death examines the political disjuncture between the evidence presented in favour of active euthanasia (AE), physician-assisted death (PAD) and the current practice of refusing to grant AE and PAD legal status in Canada. It will examine the political dynamics underlying the disjuncture using political pressure groups, constructivism, rational choice, institutionalism and structuralism. There is empirical evidence that demonstrates support for the legalization of AE and PAD. Sixty-seven percent of Canadians support AE /PAD and 80 percent support allowing physicians to assist in AE and PAD (Angus Reid 2012) however, Parliament has not legalized AE/PAD and the CMA has not sanctioned AE /PAD. The two sides of the debate have clearly communicated their arguments. The arguments on each side are strong and have merit. Conversely, the arguments against AE and PAD appear to hold more weight with institutions than with the public. This thesis examines a number of different reasons for why AE/PAD remains illegal in Canada despite society’s widespread support for AE/PAD. The results of the research found no one method explains the disjuncture between the evidence presented in favour of active euthanasia and the current practice of refusing to grant it legal status. However, discursive institutionalism does help elites to generate and communicate the discourse of AE and PAD. It also explains how discourse can also occur from the bottom which results in a new discourse. For example, physicians, politicians, and the public who have deviated from the accepted discourse on AE and PAD can help to create a new discourse regarding AE and PAD policies. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Dr. Frank Harvey (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Louise Carbert, Florian Bail (thesis-reader), Dr. Katherine Fierlbeck (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Physician-assisted death; active euthanasia; end-of-life

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coombes, K. (2013). Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/21726

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coombes, Kendra. “Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/21726.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coombes, Kendra. “Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia.” 2013. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Coombes K. Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2013. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/21726.

Council of Science Editors:

Coombes K. Politics of End-of-Life Care: Active Euthanasia. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/21726


Dalhousie University

2. Wilson, Emma. Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2015, Dalhousie University

Network governance is becoming a dominant governing paradigm. Through this governing form, lateralized, pluricentric, and interconnected public, private, and semi-public actors make policy decisions. The application of power, through the act of governing, becomes departed from traditional democratic accountability mechanisms. Three Canadian cases are explored to make this point: the Urban Aboriginal Strategy (UAS), the Homelessness Partnering Strategy (HPS), and the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer (CPAC). The problem of democratic accountability within network governance is the crux of my thesis. This thesis examines how those granted power, in a networked governing context, could be held to account. Existing approaches to this problem are limited due to a reliance on the idea of accountability as hierarchical and bureaucratic in nature, and as having a unidirectional ‘principal-agent’ foundation. This thesis moves the discussion towards a postliberal re-theorizing of new accountability frameworks that democratically qualify governance networks. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Katherine Fierlbeck (graduate-coordinator), Louise Carbert (thesis-reader), Kristen Good (thesis-reader), Katherine Fierlbeck (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Governance; Network Governance; Accountability; Canada

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Wilson, E. (2015). Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/56299

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Wilson, Emma. “Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/56299.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Wilson, Emma. “Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance.” 2015. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Wilson E. Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/56299.

Council of Science Editors:

Wilson E. Towards Accountability in Democratic Network Governance. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/56299


Dalhousie University

3. Bisset, Ben. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2014, Dalhousie University

Place is a common theme in depictions of Nova Scotian politics. The Ivany Commission, for example, describes in its recent report deep attitudinal cleavages between urban and rural residents, who seem almost to occupy different worlds (Nova Scotia 2014: 10). Using the Ivany Report as a starting point, this thesis tests the assumption that spatial factors explain differences in attitudes. Respondents to the 2013 Comparative Provincial Election Project survey are assigned to geographic categories, and regression models are developed to identify the relationship between these categories and attitudes. The results provide mixed evidence for the spatial hypothesis. Whereas some variables exhibit no spatial variation, others indicate that rural and Mainland residence is correlated with economic and moral conservatism and a preference for government attention to rural issues. Systematic spatial variation in public opinion therefore does exist, although it is less dramatic than the stark divisions identified by the Ivany Commission. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Katherine Fierlbeck (graduate-coordinator), Robert Finbow (thesis-reader), Jennifer Smith (thesis-reader), Louise Carbert (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Nova Scotia; public opinion; political attitudes; rural-urban; political culture

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bisset, B. (2014). An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bisset, Ben. “An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed January 25, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bisset, Ben. “An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.” 2014. Web. 25 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Bisset B. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. [cited 2021 Jan 25]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943.

Council of Science Editors:

Bisset B. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943

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