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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Lori Turnbull"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Bourque, Angelle. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2011, Dalhousie University

Why did the people of New Brunswick fail to accept the agreement between the governments of New Brunswick and Québec to sell NB Power to Hydro-Québec? This research seeks to answer that question by examining the arguments both for and against the proposed sale of NB Power using historical institutionalism. It determines that NB Power is on two concurrent paths that are linked, yet distinct. This research then determines that the agreement to sell NB Power was a critical juncture that failed, since it was never finalized, but succeeded in creating a new momentum for change in New Brunswick. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert Finbow (external-examiner), Frank Harvey (graduate-coordinator), Lori Turnbull (thesis-reader), Jennifer Smith (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: NB Power; Hydro-Quebec; New Brunswick; historical institutionalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bourque, A. (2011). NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bourque, Angelle. “NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bourque, Angelle. “NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.” 2011. Web. 19 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bourque A. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251.

Council of Science Editors:

Bourque A. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251


Dalhousie University

2. Irvine, Lewis. PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2011, Dalhousie University

The author examines Provincial Reconstruction Teams (PRTs) as a face, or tool, of foreign policy used by governments. PRTs are unique organizations that have been created to specifically satisfy the security and development requirements of failed or fragile states and in the context of this study, specifically Afghanistan. The essential questions are: how do PRTs meet the objectives for which they were organized and how effective are they at the job? This study seeks to answer these questions and to determine the motives for this type of international involvement from the perspective of contributing states that form the 26 PRTs that are part of the NATO/ISAF organization. This crisis has presented new challenges to governments at home as they attempt to design and field a group of military and civilians that are equipped and trained to meet the demands placed upon them for security and development in Afghanistan. Advisors/Committee Members: N/A (external-examiner), Frank Harvey (graduate-coordinator), David Black (thesis-reader), Lori Turnbull (thesis-reader), Danford Middlemiss (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Subject Not Available

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Irvine, L. (2011). PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14225

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Irvine, Lewis. “PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 19, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14225.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Irvine, Lewis. “PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY.” 2011. Web. 19 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Irvine L. PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14225.

Council of Science Editors:

Irvine L. PROVINCIAL RECONSTRUCTION TEAMS: A FACE OF FOREIGN POLICY. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14225

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