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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Jennifer Smith"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Bisset, Ben. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2014, Dalhousie University

Place is a common theme in depictions of Nova Scotian politics. The Ivany Commission, for example, describes in its recent report deep attitudinal cleavages between urban and rural residents, who seem almost to occupy different worlds (Nova Scotia 2014: 10). Using the Ivany Report as a starting point, this thesis tests the assumption that spatial factors explain differences in attitudes. Respondents to the 2013 Comparative Provincial Election Project survey are assigned to geographic categories, and regression models are developed to identify the relationship between these categories and attitudes. The results provide mixed evidence for the spatial hypothesis. Whereas some variables exhibit no spatial variation, others indicate that rural and Mainland residence is correlated with economic and moral conservatism and a preference for government attention to rural issues. Systematic spatial variation in public opinion therefore does exist, although it is less dramatic than the stark divisions identified by the Ivany Commission. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Katherine Fierlbeck (graduate-coordinator), Robert Finbow (thesis-reader), Jennifer Smith (thesis-reader), Louise Carbert (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Nova Scotia; public opinion; political attitudes; rural-urban; political culture

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APA (6th Edition):

Bisset, B. (2014). An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bisset, Ben. “An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bisset, Ben. “An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia.” 2014. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bisset B. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943.

Council of Science Editors:

Bisset B. An 'Unintegrated' Province? Examining the Extent of Spatial Cleavages in Public Opinion in Nova Scotia. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55943


Dalhousie University

2. Bourque, Angelle. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.

Degree: MA, Department of Political Science, 2011, Dalhousie University

Why did the people of New Brunswick fail to accept the agreement between the governments of New Brunswick and Québec to sell NB Power to Hydro-Québec? This research seeks to answer that question by examining the arguments both for and against the proposed sale of NB Power using historical institutionalism. It determines that NB Power is on two concurrent paths that are linked, yet distinct. This research then determines that the agreement to sell NB Power was a critical juncture that failed, since it was never finalized, but succeeded in creating a new momentum for change in New Brunswick. Advisors/Committee Members: Robert Finbow (external-examiner), Frank Harvey (graduate-coordinator), Lori Turnbull (thesis-reader), Jennifer Smith (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: NB Power; Hydro-Quebec; New Brunswick; historical institutionalism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Bourque, A. (2011). NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Bourque, Angelle. “NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.” 2011. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 18, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Bourque, Angelle. “NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale.” 2011. Web. 18 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Bourque A. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. [cited 2021 Apr 18]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251.

Council of Science Editors:

Bourque A. NB Power and Historical Institutionalism: Why the People of New Brunswick Could Not Accept the Sale. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14251

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