Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Dr. Joan Evans"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters

1. Getty, Gracie A.M. An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man.

Degree: PhD, School of Nursing, 2013, Dalhousie University

Introduction: The lifespan of Mi’kmaq First Nations men continues to be eight years less than that of other Canadian men. Therefore, this study examined the intersecting relationships between the social determinants of gender, health practices and other factors on the health of Mi’kmaq boys and men living in Elsipogtog First Nation. Goal: To promote the health of Mi’kmaq men living in Elsipogtog First Nation and to decrease the health disparities among Mi’kmaq men and other Canadian men. Objectives: (a) To explore how Mi’kmaq men construct their masculinities across the lifespan within Mi’kmaq culture; (b) To examine Mi’kmaq men’s perceptions of health and health practices and how their practices of masculinity influence these practices; (c) To explore how the experiences of illness and health influence Mi’kmaq men’s perceptions of their masculinity and the configuration of its practices; (d) To contribute to the scholarship of masculinities, health, culture, race, and inequity; (f) To build research capacity among members of the community of Elsipogtog; and (e) To identify strategies or programs that will support the health of Mi’kmaq men and their ability to care for their own health. Method: A community based participatory action research study based on an Indigenist critical social theoretical approach was used to gather and analyze the data. A research team of four Mi’kmaq people worked with me to analyze the data from an Indigenous perspective. A community advisory committee advised the research team regarding recruitment issues and the findings of the study. Thirty Mi’kmaq men and seven women were interviewed. Findings: The masculinities practices of Mi’kmaq men were: (a) respecting women, (b) fathering their children, (c) providing for their families, (d) caring for the environment, (e) respecting self and others, and (f) respecting sexually diverse family friends and self. During their lifetimes, many participants dealt with multiple losses, addiction, racism, sexual abuse, suicide attempts, and poverty. Their masculinity practices, culture, and spiritual health practices served as resiliency factors that contributed to their health status and practices Conclusions: The masculinity practices of Mi’kmaq men were strengths in their health. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Kim Anderson (external-examiner), Dr. Marilyn MacDonald (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Blye Frank, Dr. Charlotte Loppie Reading, Dr. Ruth Martin-Misener (thesis-reader), Dr. Joan Evans (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), No (manuscripts), No (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Community based participatory action research; Indigenous health; Indigenous masculinities; Mi'kmaq culture

…of the support, humor, wisdom, and patient guidance of Dr. Joan Evans. She has consistently… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Getty, G. A. M. (2013). An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man. (Doctoral Dissertation). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/36267

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Getty, Gracie A M. “An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Dalhousie University. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/36267.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Getty, Gracie A M. “An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man.” 2013. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Getty GAM. An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2013. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/36267.

Council of Science Editors:

Getty GAM. An Indigenist Perspective on the health/wellbeing and masculinities of Mi'kmaq men Tet-Pagi-Tel-Sit: Perceiving himself to be a strong balanced spiritual man. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/36267

2. Simpson, Anna Catherine. Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Degree: PhD, Interdisciplinary PhD Programme, 2012, Dalhousie University

Physical and psychosocial symptoms in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are cumulative and profound; global financial and human costs are huge. COPD in late stages runs an unpredictable downward course of increasing, potentially fatal exacerbations. Nevertheless many physicians avoid advance care planning in this context, a choice that tends to promote last minute crisis decision-making. To explore a more ethically sound proactive approach to end-of-life care decision-making I conducted a qualitative study informed by the question: “What is required for meaningful and effective advance care planning in the context of advanced COPD?” Fifteen participants (eight patients with advanced COPD plus seven intimate others) participated in two in-home advance care planning discussions that incorporated patient-centred care principles. Session transcripts were analyzed using "interpretive description." Despite initial wariness, participants were able to discuss their care-related hopes and preferences and reported that the process was a positive one. Interpretation of the positive feedback suggested participants experienced the process as a chance to: a) talk with an attentive clinician, b) learn, c) consider care-related goals and preferences, and, d) have intimate others hear about these goals/preferences. Interpretation of the process that led to this positive assessment is described in terms of a thematic network. The overarching global theme of this network was "advance care planning as collaborative care," which involved three organizing themes – partnering, negotiating ambiguity, and being a resource – and a cluster of basic themes related to each of these. The "collaborative care" approach is discussed as a guide to advance care planning in advanced COPD. Like other advance care planning models, the study approach included a skilled clinician facilitator, provision of targeted information, and attention to readiness. There were four new elements: focus on caring, engaging hope, facilitator reflective praxis, and contextual sensitivity. While potentially enhancing the "care" dimension in advance care planning, the study approach may incidentally improve resource allocation and satisfaction with outcomes. Done well it may enhance decision-making and care planning, and, just as importantly, be experienced as care itself at a time and by those often neglected in this regard. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Shelley Raffin Bouchal (external-examiner), Dr. Marina Pluzhenskaya (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Nuala Kenny, Dr. Christy Simpson, Dr. Graeme Rocker, Dr. Joan Evans (thesis-reader), Dr. Deborah MacLeod (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Yes (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: COPD; advance care planning; patient-centred care; ethics; hope

…Dalhousie Dept of Bioethics, and Dr. Joan Evans, Director, Medical Communication Skills Program… 

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Simpson, A. C. (2012). Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). (Doctoral Dissertation). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15015

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Simpson, Anna Catherine. “Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Dalhousie University. Accessed August 11, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15015.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Simpson, Anna Catherine. “Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).” 2012. Web. 11 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Simpson AC. Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2012. [cited 2020 Aug 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15015.

Council of Science Editors:

Simpson AC. Negotiating Uncertainty: Advance care planning in advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15015

.