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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Dr. Jason McDougall"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Holland, Patrick. DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmacology, 2012, Dalhousie University

GPCRs are known to form dimeric structures, and this affects their pharmacological properties. The ?2AR and AT1aR are GPCRs that are involved the regulation of the adrenergic and renin-angiotensin systems. The ?2AR is polymorphic at position 164, affecting its responsiveness to adrenergic ligands. Both receptors have been shown to form dimers, but little is known on how dimerization affects their trafficking and signalling following ligand treatments. Plasma membrane localization, arrestin-2 recruitment, and G-protein interactions were determined between receptor dimers using molecular biological techniques. This study demonstrates that the formation of heterodimers can change the expected response to ligand treatments, along with associated trafficking events. It was determined that ligands bind to dimers, resulting in conformational changes to the dimeric complexes. Both the ?2AR and AT1aR are targeted in cardiovascular disease and this research demonstrates the importance of dimerization when prescribing drug therapies to avoid potential unwanted drug side effects. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Elizabeth Cowley (external-examiner), Dr. Eileen Denovan-Wright (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Jason McDougall (thesis-reader), Dr. Eileen Denovan-Wright (thesis-reader), Dr. Denis Dupré (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Yes (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: GPCRs; Signalling; Polymorphism; Dimerization; Receptor Pharmacology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Holland, P. (2012). DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15245

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Holland, Patrick. “DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15245.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Holland, Patrick. “DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS.” 2012. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Holland P. DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2012. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15245.

Council of Science Editors:

Holland P. DRUGS, DIMERS, AND MUTATIONS: INVESTIGATING THE EFFECTS OF LIGANDS AND A ?2-ADRENERGIC POLYMORPHISM ON HOMO/HETERODIMERIZATION OF ?2-ADRENERGIC AND ANGIOTENSIN II TYPE 1 RECEPTORS. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/15245


Dalhousie University

2. McCarthy, Justin. EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS.

Degree: MS, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, 2014, Dalhousie University

There is growing evidence that complement is activated during inflammatory gastrointestinal disease but there is a deficit in our understanding of roles the anaphylatoxin C3a may have on intestinal epithelial cells (IECs). We have identified mRNA and protein for the C3a receptor (C3aR) in the IEC lines T84 and HT-29, as well as in freshly isolated murine colonic epithelium. We have identified Gi as the G protein through which C3aR signals, and activation of the downstream signaling molecules Ras, C-Raf, ERK1/2 and activation of Nuclear Factor B. We found that C3a increased mRNA levels of the chemokine CXCL2. We propose a role for C3a in which this split complement protein is pro-survival in the gut and helps promote wound healing while priming IECs for subsequent inflammation based on findings that indicate C3a influences IEC secretion of angiogenin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Dr. Brent Johnston (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Brent Johnston (thesis-reader), Dr. Jason McDougall (thesis-reader), Dr. Tim Lee (thesis-reader), Dr. Andrew Stadnyk (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: C3a; C3aR; Complement; IEC; intestinal epithelium

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McCarthy, J. (2014). EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/53989

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McCarthy, Justin. “EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/53989.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McCarthy, Justin. “EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS.” 2014. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

McCarthy J. EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/53989.

Council of Science Editors:

McCarthy J. EXPLORING THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF C3aR LIGATION ON INTESTINAL EPITHELIAL CELLS. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/53989

3. Linton, Patrick. Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats.

Degree: MS, Department of Pharmacology, 2013, Dalhousie University

A recent study discovered elevated levels of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) in the synovial fluid of OA patients (Eli Lilly, unpublished). LPA is required for the initiation of neuropathic pain (Inoue, 2004), and therefore, elevated levels are indicative of a neuropathic pain state. The present study attempted to determine: if 1) LPA causes neuronal damage to joint afferents, and 2) if LPA is responsible for a neuropathic pain component in OA. The experimental OA model monosodium iodoacetate (MIA) was found to cause demyelination to the saphenous nerve at 14 days post-treatment. Selective LPA antagonism prevented this damage, implicating LPA in this novel pain state. The present study concluded that 1) neuropathic pain is a component of OA, and 2) LPA facilitates the initiation of this neuropathic pain. These new findings will allow better understanding of disease etiology and may lead to the emergence of an entirely new line of OA therapeutics. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Dr. Jana Sawynok (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Christopher Sinal (thesis-reader), Dr. Andrew Stadnyk (thesis-reader), Dr. Jason McDougall (thesis-supervisor), Not Applicable (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Subject Not Available

…xi ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS First and foremost I would like to thank my supervisor Dr. Jason… …support and guidance during my studies here at Dalhousie University. I would like to give a… …McDougall for his tutelage over the past two years. I would also like to thank my supervisory… 

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Linton, P. (2013). Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35464

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Linton, Patrick. “Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed April 15, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35464.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Linton, Patrick. “Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats.” 2013. Web. 15 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Linton P. Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35464.

Council of Science Editors:

Linton P. Involvement of Lysophosphatidic Acid in Peripheral Neuropathy and Osteoarthritic Pain in Rats. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35464

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