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You searched for +publisher:"Dalhousie University" +contributor:("Dr. Dennis Phillips"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Dalhousie University

1. Mulle, Jennifer. In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection.

Degree: MS, School of Human Communication Disorders, 2012, Dalhousie University

Auditory processing disorder (APD) is characterized by deficits in the auditory modality that are not due to a global processing problem or to deficiencies in the peripheral auditory system. Diagnosis of APD is time-consuming and could benefit from an objective test. Temporal processing ability is often impaired in cases of APD, which includes deficits on gap detection tasks. Previous attempts to correlate gap detection thresholds to electrophysiological responses have used the P1-N1-P2 response, mismatch negativity (MMN), and 40 Hz auditory steady-state response (ASSR), but these attempts have not been successful, especially using between-channel gap detection tasks. The current study used a modulation gap detection task and recorded the above responses to supra- and subthreshold gaps and stimuli with no gap. A significant P2 response and a later positive peak distinguished perception of a suprathreshold gap. Improvements over previous studies, the relation to auditory training, and limitations and directions for future research are discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Aaron Newman (external-examiner), Dr. Joy Armson (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Dennis Phillips (thesis-reader), Michel Comeau (thesis-reader), Dr. Steve Aiken (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), No (manuscripts), No (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: Modulated Gap Detection; Auditory Processing Disorder; Temporal processing; P1N1P2; Between channel gap detection

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APA (6th Edition):

Mulle, J. (2012). In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14586

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mulle, Jennifer. “In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection.” 2012. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14586.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mulle, Jennifer. “In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection.” 2012. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Mulle J. In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2012. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14586.

Council of Science Editors:

Mulle J. In Search of an Electrophysiological Correlate to Between-Channel Modulation Gap Detection. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/14586


Dalhousie University

2. King, Jillian. Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex.

Degree: MS, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, 2014, Dalhousie University

Studying vision in mice is a relatively recent endeavor, with most research dating within the last 10 years. One goal of this research is to examine similarities and differences between the mouse visual system and more traditional animal models. This thesis contains two such studies, with the results from each suggesting that the mouse is a legitimate model for visual studies. The first study examines orientation adaptation and demonstrates that after orientation adaptation mouse orientation tuning curves shift similarly to what is observed in cats and primates. The second study looks at contrast adaptation, and provides evidence that it not spike rate dependent but rather pattern-specific. Combined, these studies suggest that mouse primary visual cortex adjusts to its visual surroundings comparably to traditional animal models, and also provide more of a foundation for future experiments utilizing genetic tools that are only available in mice. Advisors/Committee Members: n/a (external-examiner), Dr. Gail Eskes (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Dennis Phillips (thesis-reader), Dr. Donald Mitchell (thesis-reader), Dr. Nathan Crowder (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Not Applicable (manuscripts), Not Applicable (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: mouse; vision; adaptation

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APA (6th Edition):

King, J. (2014). Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex. (Masters Thesis). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55995

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

King, Jillian. “Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex.” 2014. Masters Thesis, Dalhousie University. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55995.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

King, Jillian. “Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex.” 2014. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

King J. Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55995.

Council of Science Editors:

King J. Visual Adaptation in Mouse Primary Visual Cortex. [Masters Thesis]. Dalhousie University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/55995


Dalhousie University

3. Salmon, Joshua. HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION.

Degree: PhD, Department of Psychology and Neuroscience, 2013, Dalhousie University

Manuscript-based dissertation. One introductory chapter, one concluding chapter, and five manuscripts (seven chapters in total).

In our environment we do two things with objects: identify them, and act on them. Perhaps not coincidentally, research has shown that the brain appears to have two distinct visual streams, one that is engaged during the identification of objects, and one that is associated with action. Although these visual streams are distinct, there has been increasing interest in how the action and identification systems interact during grasping and identification tasks. In particular, the current research explored the role that previous motor experience with familiar manipulable objects might have on the time it takes healthy participants to identify these objects (relative to non-manipulable objects). Furthermore, previous research has shown that there are multiple, computationally and neuro-anatomically different, action systems. The current research was particularly interested in the action systems involved in 1) grasping, and 2) functionally using an object. Work began by developed a new stimulus set of black & white photographs of manipulable and non-manipulable objects, and collecting ‘graspability’ and ‘functional usage’ ratings (chapter 2). This stimulus set was then used to show that high manipulability was related to faster naming but slower categorization (chapter 3). In chapter 4, the nature of these effects was explored by extending a computational model by Yoon, Heinke and Humphreys (2002). Results from chapter 5 indicated independent roles of graspability and functional usage during tasks that required identification of objects presented either with or without a concurrent mask. Specifically, graspaility effects were larger for items that were not masked; and functional use effects were larger for items that were masked. Finally, chapter 6 indicated that action effects during identification tasks are partly based on how realistic the depictions of the objects are. That is, results from chapter 6 indicated the manipulability effects are larger for photographs than they are for line-drawings of the same objects. These results have direct implications for the design of future identification tasks, but, more broadly, they speak to the interactive nature of the human mind: Action representations can be invoked and measured during simple identification tasks, even where acting on the object is not required.

Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Michael Masson (external-examiner), Patti Devlin (graduate-coordinator), Dr. Raymond Klein (thesis-reader), Dr. David Westwood (thesis-reader), Dr. Dennis Phillips (thesis-reader), Dr. Patricia McMullen (thesis-supervisor), Received (ethics-approval), Yes (manuscripts), Yes (copyright-release).

Subjects/Keywords: object recognition; identification; action; manipulable; manipulability; naming; categorization; photographs

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Salmon, J. (2013). HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION. (Doctoral Dissertation). Dalhousie University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35395

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Salmon, Joshua. “HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Dalhousie University. Accessed October 31, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35395.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Salmon, Joshua. “HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION.” 2013. Web. 31 Oct 2020.

Vancouver:

Salmon J. HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2013. [cited 2020 Oct 31]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35395.

Council of Science Editors:

Salmon J. HOW MANIPULABILITY (GRASPABILITY AND FUNCTIONAL USAGE) INFLUENCES OBJECT IDENTIFICATION. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Dalhousie University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10222/35395

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