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You searched for +publisher:"DIAL (Belgium)" +contributor:("UNamur - INF_PRECISE"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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1. Boucher, Quentin. Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models.

Degree: 2014, DIAL (Belgium)

In the past, companies produced large amounts of products through mass production lines. Advantages of such an approach are reduced production costs and time-to-market. While it is (still) appropriate for some goods like food or household items, customer preferences evolve to customised products. In a more and more competitive environment, product customisation is taken to the extreme by companies in order to gain market share. Companies provide customisation tools, more commonly called product configurators, to assist their staff and customers in deciding upon the characteristics of the product to be delivered. Our experience reveals that some existing configurators are implemented in an ad-hoc fashion. This is especially cumbersome when numerous and non-trivial constraints have to be dealt with. For instance, we have observed in two industrial cases that relationships between configuration options are hard-coded and mixed with GUI code. As constraints are scattered in the source code, severe maintenance issues occur. In this thesis, we propose a pragmatic and model-driven way to generate configuration GUIs. We rely on feature models to represent and reason about the configuration options and their complex relationships. Once feature models have been elaborated, there is still a need to produce a GUI, including the integration with underlying reasoning mechanisms to control and update the GUI elements. We present a model-view-presenter architecture to design configurators, which separates concerns between a feature model (configuration option modelling), its associated solver (automated reasoning support) and the presentation of the GUI. To fill the gap between feature models and configuration GUIs, the various constructs of the feature model formalism are rendered as GUI elements through model transformations. Those transformations can be parametrised through beautification and view languages to derive specific configuration GUIs. A prototype generating HTML code is proposed.

Par le passé, les entreprises produisaient de grandes quantités de biens grâce à la production de masse, une telle approche permettant de réduire les coûts et temps de production. Bien que cette stratégie soit toujours adaptée dans certains cas (alimentation, produits ménagers), les utilisateurs ont maintenant une préférence pour les produits personnalisés. Dans un marché de plus en plus compétitif, cette personnalisation est poussée à l'extrême par les entreprises afin de gagner des parts de marché. Ces entreprises mettent des outils appelés "configurateurs" à disposition des clients et de leur personnel afin de les guider dans le choix des options du produit final. L'expérience nous a montré que les configurateurs existants sont implémentés de manière ponctuelle. Ceux-ci sont d'autant plus compliqués à mettre en place et maintenir qu'il y a des contraintes non-triviales à gérer. Par exemple, nous avons observé dans deux études de cas industrielles que les dépendances entre deux options de configuration se trouvaient dans le code de…

Advisors/Committee Members: UNamur - INF_PRECISE, UNamur - Ecole doctorale en sciences, Heymans, Patrick, Perrouin, Gilles, Englebert, Vincent, Botterweck, Goetz, Vanderdonckt, Jean.

Subjects/Keywords: Variability Modelling; Graphical User Interfaces; Feature Model; Configuration; Modélisation de la Variabilité; Interfaces Graphiques

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Boucher, Q. (2014). Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models. (Thesis). DIAL (Belgium). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/153189

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Boucher, Quentin. “Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models.” 2014. Thesis, DIAL (Belgium). Accessed May 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/153189.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Boucher, Quentin. “Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models.” 2014. Web. 26 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Boucher Q. Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models. [Internet] [Thesis]. DIAL (Belgium); 2014. [cited 2019 May 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/153189.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Boucher Q. Engineering Configuration Graphical User Interfaces from Variability Models. [Thesis]. DIAL (Belgium); 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/153189

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

2. Cordy, Maxime. Model Checking for the Masses.

Degree: 2014, DIAL (Belgium)

The model-checking problem for software product lines is harder than for single systems. Indeed, one has to verify all the software variants of a product line, whose number grows exponentially in the number of their differences. Techniques intended for single systems are inefficient in this case, for these can only be applied to all products separately. Variability-aware modelling formalisms and algorithms were designed as a more appropriate answer to that problem. Their strength lies in their ability to check a behaviour common to several products only once, which leads to substantial performance gains. Although they constitute a major step toward the efficient verification of product lines, these techniques are not yet mature enough to truly achieve this objective. They still lack optimisations to verify large models, the expressiveness to represent complex forms of variable behaviour, as well as usable languages and tools required for industrial transfer. This thesis aims at improving product-line model checking in order to provide formalisms, algorithms, and tools that together hold the potential to verify real-world software product lines. We first study the state-of-the-art model-checking approaches for software product lines. We compare them in terms of available formalisms and algorithms, and we determine that the approach based on Featured Transition Systems (FTS) is the most suitable to act as a basis for the design of novel techniques. We then extend its theory along two axes: efficiency and expressiveness. For the former, we propose abstraction methods that can reduce the size of the model to check while maintaining correctness and completeness; they consist of extensions of single-system abstraction techniques applied to FTS, and of new techniques that abstract away from their variability. As for expressiveness, on the one hand we propose featured timed automata as a combination of FTS and real-time behaviour. On the other hand, we analyse how to support in FTS complex forms of variability such as numeric features and multi-features. We implemented our theoretical results into a new model-checking tool named ProVeLines. As all our extensions are based on FTS, they share many commonalities. ProVeLines was therefore designed as a product line whose each variant implements a distinct combination of verification formalisms and algorithms. Finally, we show that the principles we designed for product-line model checking can also be applied to other formal methods, namely the verification of adaptive systems and the synthesis of controllers for product lines.

(DOCSC06)  – UNamur, 2014

Advisors/Committee Members: UNamur - INF_PRECISE, UNamur - Ecole doctorale en sciences, Atlee, Joanne, Greenyer, Joel, Heymans, Patrick, Legay, Axel, Petit, Michaël, Schobbens, Pierre-Yves.

Subjects/Keywords: Formal methods; model checking; software product lines

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Cordy, M. (2014). Model Checking for the Masses. (Thesis). DIAL (Belgium). Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/152729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cordy, Maxime. “Model Checking for the Masses.” 2014. Thesis, DIAL (Belgium). Accessed May 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/152729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cordy, Maxime. “Model Checking for the Masses.” 2014. Web. 26 May 2019.

Vancouver:

Cordy M. Model Checking for the Masses. [Internet] [Thesis]. DIAL (Belgium); 2014. [cited 2019 May 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/152729.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Cordy M. Model Checking for the Masses. [Thesis]. DIAL (Belgium); 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/2078.2/152729

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.