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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Traverso, Enzo"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Hakopian, Sylvia. Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism .

Degree: 2017, Cornell University

Capitalizing on children’s “extraordinary ability to learn,” Italian Fascist dictator Benito Mussolini decreed an order to issue five elementary school textbooks, known as the Libro unico dello Stato in 1926. Reaching across Italy’s geographic and multicultural barriers, the purpose of this state-issued textbook was to standardize Italian schooling and create a unified body of Fascist subjects. Yet, Fascist Italy’s new curricula proved anything but uniform, as the regime issued two distinct rural and urban editions of the Libro unico between 1929 and 1944 following Mussolini’s decree. Exploring tensions within the regime’s ideas on nationalism in a study that combines literary, theoretical, and historical analyses, my dissertation, Children’s Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism, argues that the Libro unico served purposefully to stratify and not unify Italy’s student body at the primary school. Approaching my study of the regime’s education reforms, pedagogic manuals, and scholastic reading material through an Althusserian framework, my work diverges from the issues which current scholarship has tended to focus on (i.e. militarism, Aryanism, questione meridionale) and in this way offers a new perspective on Fascist cultural history. Examining the rationale behind Fascist policies on elementary school education, I show how Mussolini established an apparatus of textbooks that would shape children into hard-working Fascist devotees. The purpose, as I see it, was one of economic exploitation. Placing students into lower-working classes, these textbooks, in addition to the vocational school system stemming from pedagogue Giovanni Gentile’s 1923 school reforms, did not encourage students to pursue their studies beyond the elementary school level. Rather, they served to mold students into manual workers—farmers and industrialists—who would produce the products and services necessary to maintain the regime’s autarchic policies at a time when Italy was experiencing an economic crisis. But what I uncover through my reading of the textbooks’ stories, poems, and illustrations is the broader implications which this schooling had on class division as well as modern notions of italianità, democracy, and civic duty. Despite its failures, Fascist schooling established a system of stratification that contributes to class division and social inequality to this very day. Advisors/Committee Members: Traverso, Enzo (committeeMember), Lasansky, Diana Medina (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Children's Literature; History of Education; Italian Studies; Marxist Critical Theory; Textbooks; European studies; Education history; Romance literature; Fascism

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hakopian, S. (2017). Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56714

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hakopian, Sylvia. “Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism .” 2017. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56714.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hakopian, Sylvia. “Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism .” 2017. Web. 04 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Hakopian S. Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56714.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hakopian S. Children's Utopia / Fascist Utopia: Ideology and Reception of Textbooks under Italian Fascism . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56714

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Duong, Kevin Trieu. Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France .

Degree: 2017, Cornell University

During the struggle for democracy in France, political thinkers across the spectrum pressed into service an unusual image of violence. Rather than a source of anarchy and disorder, this violence generated social cohesion. Instead of fragmentation, it promised to retie the bonds of democratic society. This dissertation studies how a variety of writers and intellectuals weaponized this image of violence in the political culture of nineteenth century France. What could this violence accomplish that other languages of democratic agency could not? What were the sources of its appeal? To answer these questions, I consider four episodes where French thinkers believed social disintegration threatened the nation: the regicide of Louis XVI, early French colonization of Algeria, the Paris Commune, and the eve of World War I. In each episode, political thinkers warned of social breakdown spurred by democratization. In each case, they also claimed that violence by the people could repair the cohesion of the French social body. Studying these episodes underscores how no single intellectual tradition held a monopoly over regenerative violence in France, because the problem it hoped to answer was fundamental: how can the cohesion of the social body be repaired in the age of democracy? It was a problem that could not be remedied by simple appeal to constitutionalism or natural law theory. Thus, to repair the moral foundations of “the social,” French thinkers on both the left and right pushed towards a vision of democratic violence as social regeneration. To form a democratic society in history rather than in theory, French thinkers did not repudiate violence as anti-social or pre-political. Instead, they reached for it in the form of democratic terror. Advisors/Committee Members: Rana, Aziz (committeeMember), Traverso, Enzo (committeeMember), Kramnick, Isaac (committeeMember), Robcis, Camille Alexandra (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: History; Political science; democracy; France; political thought; violence; Philosophy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Duong, K. T. (2017). Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/47712

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Duong, Kevin Trieu. “Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France .” 2017. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 04, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/47712.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Duong, Kevin Trieu. “Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France .” 2017. Web. 04 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Duong KT. Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 04]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/47712.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Duong KT. Democratic Terror: Redemptive Violence and the Formation of Nineteenth Century France . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/47712

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.