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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Tenney, Jonathan S."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Weimar, Jason Everett. Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible .

Degree: 2017, Cornell University

This paper argues that the Hebrew Bible and Ancient South Arabian texts share a common usage of the phrase “wood and stone,” with a specific focus on Minaic construction texts from the 5th-2nd century BCE and four texts from Kings (1 Kings 5:32; 15:22; 2 Kings 12:13; 22:6). In both corpora “wood and stone” functions as a merism, a literary device that uses two pieces to express a whole. Furthermore, the phrase also appears in contexts denoting divine favor and expresses the religious-political authority of the primary agent(s) behind the construction. This shared usage of “wood and stone” helps solve an exegetical difficulty in Exodus 7:19 and also hints at a deeper inland tradition between ancient Palestine and Yemen that shared similar conceptions of how political-religious authority should be expressed. Advisors/Committee Members: Tenney, Jonathan S. (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Ancient South Arabian; Arabia; Bible; Exodus; Kings; Yemen; Biblical studies; Near Eastern studies; Archaeology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Weimar, J. E. (2017). Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56943

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weimar, Jason Everett. “Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible .” 2017. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56943.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weimar, Jason Everett. “Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible .” 2017. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Weimar JE. Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56943.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Weimar JE. Of Wood and Stone: A Comparative Study of Ancient South Arabian Construction Texts and the Hebrew Bible . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56943

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Nash, Dustin. Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition .

Degree: 2015, Cornell University

The Hebrew Bible contains seventeen isolated passages, scattered from Genesis to 2 Samuel, that use the Hebrew term ‫"( אח‬brother") to define an inter-group relationship between two or more Israelite tribes. For over a century, biblical scholars have interpreted this terminology as conceptually dependent on the birth narratives and genealogies of Gen 29-50, reiterated in stories and lists elsewhere in the biblical corpus. However, examination of the Bible's depiction of the Israelite tribes as "brothers" outside these seventeen passages indicates that the static genealogical structure of the twelve-tribe system constitutes a late ideological framework that harmonizes dissonant descriptions of Israel as an association of "brother" tribes. Significantly, references to particular tribal groups as "brothers" in the Mari archives yields a new paradigm for understanding the origins of Israelite tribal "brotherhood" that sets aside this ideological structure. Additionally, it reveals the ways in which biblical scribes exploited particular terms and ideas as the fulcrums for editorial intervention in the Hebrew Bible's composition. More specifically, close analysis of these Akkadian texts reveals the existence of an ancient Near Eastern political discourse of "brotherhood" that identified tribal groups as independent peer polities, bound together through obligations of reciprocal peaceful relations and supportive behavior. A detailed examination of Judg 19-21 brings to light a textual core that uses the word ‫ אח‬in this precise situated meaning, indicating that the original source concerned a war between Israel and Benjamin as separate polities of parity status. The polysemic character of ‫ אח‬allowed later scribes to incorporate this textual tradition by reorienting the term's situated meaning to fit evolving ideologies of Israelite and early Jewish identity in a manner that is detectable in additional biblical passages. Advisors/Committee Members: Haines-Eitzen, Kimberly Joy (committeeMember), Tenney, Jonathan S. (committeeMember), Fleming, Daniel E (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Hebrew Bible; Mari; Scribal Practice

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nash, D. (2015). Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/39320

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nash, Dustin. “Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition .” 2015. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 06, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/39320.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nash, Dustin. “Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition .” 2015. Web. 06 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Nash D. Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2015. [cited 2020 Aug 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/39320.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nash D. Your Brothers, The Children Of Israel: Ancient Near Eastern Political Discourse And The Process Of Biblical Composition . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/39320

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

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