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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Seeley,Thomas Dyer"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Stamps, Glenn Francis. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS .

Degree: 2018, Cornell University

The main objective of this doctoral dissertation is to explore the role chemical communication may play in the diversification of the Hawaiian swordtail crickets (genus Laupala). Laupala are known for their diversification in male acoustic signaling and associated female preferences. They also possess a complex courtship which includes extensive antennal interaction and during which the male gives nuptial gifts. Despite historically being seen as indiscriminate, males are predicted to make mating decisions under certain circumstances, such as when males are limited in the resources they are able to invest in females. Given that females are silent, males are likely using some other signaling modality, such as through contact pheromones on the antennae. Here, I tested the male use of chemical cues in initiating mating decisions, the impact of these cues on species boundaries, and how pheromones may be evolving in relation to song. Using both gas chromatographic analysis and novel behavioral assays, I examined the hypothesis that male L. pruna are using chemical signals to distinguish between males and females. I found that males and females differed quantitatively in their expression of shared peaks. Further, access to the antennae alone was sufficient cause aggressive behavior or courtship behavior towards males and females, respectively. I tested the hypothesis that males are using chemical information to distinguish between species. I used L. pruna and a closely related species, L. kohalensis, and found low interspecific mating success. Chemical analysis also determined that these species differed in their pheromone profiles. Males initiated courtship in the presence of conspecific, but not heterospecific female antennae. I explored the hypothesis that male song and CHC expression are evolving together. I found significant heterogeneity among populations in both signals. The distribution of these signals follows the nonlinear ages of the volcano, versus a simple isolation-by-distance model. Together, these experiments establish chemical communication in male mate choice, demonstrate that differences in chemical expression matter for species boundaries, and suggest that acoustic and chemical signals may be coevolving early in the speciation of Laupala. Advisors/Committee Members: Seeley, Thomas Dyer (committeeMember), Raguso, Robert A. (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: male mate choice; speciation; Behavioral sciences; Evolution & development; Biogeography; chemical communication; Entomology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stamps, G. F. (2018). CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59363

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stamps, Glenn Francis. “CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS .” 2018. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59363.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stamps, Glenn Francis. “CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS .” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Stamps GF. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59363.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Stamps GF. CHEMICAL COMMUNICATION AND SPECIATION IN HAWAIIAN CRICKETS . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59363

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Niemasik, Esther Leah. Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition .

Degree: 2019, Cornell University

My dissertation research tests the previously untested idea that heterospecific competition functions as an important selective force on group size in cooperatively breeding birds, using experimental approaches with the Brown-headed nuthatch (BHNU) (Sitta pusilla). We know from prior work that the western bluebird, which is much larger, excludes nuthatches from nesting sites (Stanback 2011). I tested the following explicit hypotheses: Hypothesis 1: Inter-specific competition selects for increased group size (more individuals helping or co-breeding) in BHNU and may even be sufficient to select for helping. Hypothesis 2: BHNU groups collectively defend against nest competitors, and collectively monitor their nest sites to chase away intruders. I studied the effect of interspecific competition on the fitness consequences of cooperative breeding using an experimental design that involved creating high and low competition sites on golf courses. Half of each course was randomly assigned to the high and low heterospecific competition treatments; high competition territories had a single nest box whereas low competition territories had a pair of identical boxes within 5 m of each other at each box location. If competition acts as a selective force, reproductive success should be lower under high competition. And this is indeed what I found. GLMMs and AICc model selection criteria helped determine the model that best fit the data. The most highly supported model included both competition pressure and group size (ΔAICc >2), strongly supporting hypothesis 1. More BHNU nests failed on high competition sites (N=156, GLMM, course as fixed factor, p=0.043). Larger groups more often fledged young regardless of competition pressure, but small groups were significantly less likely to fledge young in the high than low competition treatment and this higher failure rate was due to competition. I examined the behavior of BHNUs facing competitors using simulated territorial intrusions and nest watches. Larger groups were less likely to have intruders investigate their nest site without their knowledge and retaliation (GLMM, box as fixed factor, n=202, p=0.044). Furthermore, it took large groups less time to chase intruders from their territories. The mechanisms through which helpers increase breeder success in the face of heterospecific competition are twofold, first, they provide more noise and mobbing effort, and secondly they provide more eyes on the nest site, such that competitors are spotted more quickly. Cooperative breeding rescues BHNUs from the omnipresent pressure of competitors and provides a hitherto unconsidered benefit of breeding in groups. Advisors/Committee Members: Reeve, Hudson Kern (committeeMember), Seeley, Thomas Dyer (committeeMember), Koenig, Walter D. (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Cooperative breeding; competition; Behavioral sciences; nuthatch; Ecology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Niemasik, E. L. (2019). Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67547

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Niemasik, Esther Leah. “Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition .” 2019. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67547.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Niemasik, Esther Leah. “Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition .” 2019. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Niemasik EL. Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67547.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Niemasik EL. Cooperative Breeding helps Brown-headed nuthatches (Sitta pusilla) face heterospecific competition . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67547

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

3. Hare, Colin Darragh. Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation .

Degree: 2018, Cornell University

This dissertation is an interdisciplinary investigation of three morally contested dimensions of wildlife conservation: Who, if anyone, should own wildlife? What moral obligations, if any, do people have to conserve other species? What types of governance reform could help address contemporary conservation challenges? In Chapter 1 I describe the context for this dissertation. Wildlife conservation and governance must change to meet ecological challenges and social expectations, but the scope and direction of change required are contested. Much of the discourse on the future of wildlife conservation in the United States (U.S.) revolves around the concept of wildlife as a public trust. Nevertheless, disagreement over what it means for wildlife to be a public trust and competing interpretations of the concept’s implications can exacerbate rather than ameliorate conflict over the future of wildlife conservation. Chapters 2 and 3 offer practically orientated guidance to scholars and wildlife professionals interested in the potential of public trust thinking (PTT) to inspire socially and ecologically responsible wildlife governance reform. Chapter 2 outlines PTT’s foundation principles, and chapter 3 describes challenges and opportunities in applying PTT to wildlife governance in the U.S. Chapter 4 presents results of an empirical study of moral attitudes about wildlife ownership among people living in the U.S. Variation in moral attitudes can help explain why some wildlife conservation activities are more morally acceptable than others. Chapter 5 shows that ownership (defined as respect for possession) is a powerful but overlooked cooperative solution to resource conflict throughout the biological world. It consists of a literature review of ownership across disciplines and a new evolutionary game-theoretic model of how ownership arrangements can emerge and remain stable. Chapter 6 investigates whether the theory of evolution by natural selection can explain why conservation ethics (moral beliefs, intuitions, attitudes, and norms regarding other species) exist and why they vary. It consists of eco-evolutionary models of adaptive conservation behavior, and proposes that an evolutionary perspective might help resolve persistent moral debates over the value of other species. To better understand and address contemporary conservation challenges, we need to better understand morality. And to better understand morality, we need to incorporate evolution. Wildlife conservation approaches that go with the grain of evolved dispositions and harness our capacities for sustainable behavior are less likely to be morally contested, so are especially likely to succeed. Advisors/Committee Members: Geisler, Charles C. (committeeMember), Seeley, Thomas Dyer (committeeMember), Decker, Daniel Joseph (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: morlaity; ownership; public trust; Governance; Conservation biology; evolution; conservation; Wildlife conservation; sustainability

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hare, C. D. (2018). Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64909

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hare, Colin Darragh. “Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation .” 2018. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed January 19, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64909.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hare, Colin Darragh. “Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation .” 2018. Web. 19 Jan 2020.

Vancouver:

Hare CD. Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. [cited 2020 Jan 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64909.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Hare CD. Ownership, morality, and wildlife conservation . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64909

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.