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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Sahn, David Ezra"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Ouyang, Yusi. Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China .

Degree: 2013, Cornell University

This dissertation explores the welfare status of China's 114 million ethnic minority people (Sixth National Census 2010) in three chapters. Chapter 1 finds that empirical analyses are strongly needed in order to understand the well-being of China's ethnic minority population, as debate over this topic has turned into a war of wildly differing visions yet few visions are based on micro data. Using data from the China Health and Nutrition Survey (CHNS), Chapter 2 and 3 explore, respectively, health and education inequalities between China's ethnic minority and majority populations during the period of 1989-2006. Chapter 2 finds statistically significant health inequalities against minority Chinese of all age groups; whereas Chapter 3 finds little empirical evidence that minority Chinese below 19 years of age are worse off than their majority counterparts in terms of years of schooling received at formal schools, though it does find moderate and persistent education gap disfavoring minority adults aged above 19. Both analyses find the observed disparities to be related to inequalities in endowments such as location of residence, water and sanitation, education, and household wealth; but only analysis in Chapter 3 suggests that differences in the effects of endowments are also associated with the observed education gap between the two groups. Advisors/Committee Members: Thorbecke, Erik (committeeMember), Sahn, David Ezra (committeeMember).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Ouyang, Y. (2013). Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34389

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Ouyang, Yusi. “Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China .” 2013. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed April 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34389.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Ouyang, Yusi. “Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China .” 2013. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Ouyang Y. Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34389.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Ouyang Y. Three Essays On Inequalities Between Ethnic Minority And Majority Populations In China . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34389

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Reynolds, Sarah. Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring .

Degree: 2011, Cornell University

The bulk of the literature on intra-household allocation discusses the relationship, power, and division of family resources between husband and wife. Seeking a wider understanding of family, researchers have broadened their scope to an intergenerational level, the dynamics of a parent and child are the focus of the first two papers: the first a two-stage theoretical discussion, and the second an empirical cross-sectional study. The third paper is a companion piece to the second, using the fieldwork as a case study. Paper 1 Intra-household literature focuses on bargaining power between husbands and wives, but does not consider the process between parents and children. The bequest literature asks how parents pass on wealth to their children but generally ignores the possibility that later in life parents may be codependent with children. Drawing on both arenas of family analysis, I present a model representing the nature of negotiation that may happen between parent and child: in stage one the parent is the sole decision maker, and then in stage two the child grows to participate in the bargaining process. The education decision the parent made in stage one affects the second period outcome; the child has more bargaining power with higher levels of education. A simplified analysis is done first with purely selfish participants, and then with a purely altruistic parent in a bequest model. These two extreme models are combined to form a model with both self-interested and altruistic components accruing to parent and child, a more realistic scenario. The contrasting models of a purely selfish parent with a purely altruistic parent provide insight as to how an intermediate result emerges in this model, which incorporates both characteristics. I conclude with a discussion of what would happen if a separation option is available, interpreted as an alternative wage scheme under migration. Paper 2 Within the literature on intra-household allocation I discuss a new population: teenage mothers and their mothers in Salvador, Brazil. A household survey and experimental games are the techniques used to analyze decision-making. A trust game tests for efficiency, and another game elicits valuations of a counting book, a newly introduced educational toy, to test for bargaining at the population level. While the experimental good is not representative of all elements comprising a baby's welfare, nor do these interactions purely reflect all household bargaining, this new method of analysis can be helpful when deciding policy for welfare transfers when endogeneity complicates econometric technique or when impoverished families are omitted from standard analysis due to a lack of private goods. At the population level, I find little evidence of bargaining, and Pareto efficient families' willingness to pay for the counting book is lower than the others'. The variety of behavior in the games suggests multiple family structures, some outside the typical models, and responses to the sociological questions included in the survey indicate… Advisors/Committee Members: Benjamin, Daniel (committeeMember), Beneria, Lourdes (committeeMember), Sahn, David Ezra (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Household Economics; Teen Mothers; Brazil

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Reynolds, S. (2011). Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/33608

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Reynolds, Sarah. “Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring .” 2011. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed April 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/33608.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Reynolds, Sarah. “Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring .” 2011. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Reynolds S. Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2011. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/33608.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Reynolds S. Intergenerational Intra-Household Economics: Three Essays On Parents And Offspring . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2011. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/33608

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

3. Chen, Xi. Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences .

Degree: 2012, Cornell University

This dissertation is composed of a literature review, Chapter 1, an in-depth analysis of data used in the dissertation, Chapter 2, and three main essays, Chapters 3-5, on relative concerns, social interactions and unintended consequences. To uncover the nature of social interactions, Chapter 3 studies how rural residents form social networks, and what explains the recent gift spending escalation. Chapter 4 focuses on a typical market that carries significant social stigma - paid blood plasma donation in China. I explore the role of peer interactions in the networks. Building upon it, Chapter 5 evaluates how in utero exposures to frequent and costly social events for the impoverished families impacts early child nutrients intake and health status. Chapter 1 This chapter reviews the recent literature on inequality and income distribution in rural China utilizing panel datasets. On the basis of the review, this chapter identifies new research areas with existing panel datasets and my new household panel dataset, i.e., the IFPRI-CAAS, which could shape future research. Chapter 2 The tradition of keeping written gift record in many Asian countries offers researchers an old-fashioned but underutilized means of data collection for development and social network study. This chapter documents a long-term spontaneous household gift record I collected from the field. I discuss the data collection and network structure, highlighting its unique features for studies at household and dyadic link level. Chapter 3 The growth rate of gift and festival spending in some developing countries has been much higher than that of consumption and income. I test three competing explanations of the phenomenon-peer effect, status concern, and risk pooling-based on the IFPRI-CAAS and the gift network data. I find that gift-giving behavior is largely influenced by peers in reference groups. Status concern is another key motive for keeping up with the Joneses in extending gifts. In contrast, risk pooling does not seem to be a key driver of the observed gift-giving patterns. I also show that large windfall income triggers the escalation of competitive gift-giving behavior. Chapter 4 Despite the resultant disutility, people are still engaged in behavior carrying social stigma. Empirical studies on stigma behavior are rare, largely due to the formidable challenges of collecting data on stigmatized goods and services. Combining the IFPRI-CAAS and the gift network data, I examine frequent blood sales, widely regarded as a stigmatized behavior and the driving force of public health crises. Using a novel spatial identification strategy, I find social interactions with heterogeneous intensities affect plasma sales decisions. Peer effects are directional and work through preference interactions that reduce stigma. Families with unmarried son are more likely to sell plasma to offset costs of getting married in a tight marriage market, such as a bigger house, a higher bride price and a more lavish wedding banquet. Chapter 5 Participating in and presenting… Advisors/Committee Members: Frank, Robert H (committeeMember), Sahn, David Ezra (committeeMember), Zhang, Xiao-Bo (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Relative Concerns; Social Networks; Well-being

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, X. (2012). Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31507

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Xi. “Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences .” 2012. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed April 26, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31507.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Xi. “Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences .” 2012. Web. 26 Apr 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen X. Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. [cited 2019 Apr 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31507.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen X. Essays On Social Networks: Relative Concerns, Social Interactions, And Unintended Consequences . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/31507

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.