Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Livingston, Peter A"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Cornell University

1. Phulwani, Vijay. From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory .

Degree: 2019, Cornell University

This dissertation is about the relationship between the politics of order and the politics of organizing. In particular, it argues that scholars who have taken order to be the central concept of political thought, a group often called political realists, can and should take up the study of organizing as a way of better understanding what order means in democratic politics. Popular organizing creates political power by way of strategically limited form of disorder within an existing political order. Rather than starting with the question of who the people are, how they are represented by the state, or how claims to peoplehood are made, organizing begins with the question of how existing opportunities for political action can be used to constitute the people as a political subject. Studying popular organizing means studying the ideas, institutions, and practices through which disempowered groups can be create new and empowering forms of collective political agency. I look at how the relationship between political order and political organizing has been theorized by a diverse group of realist thinkers—Thomas Hobbes, Karl Marx, W.E.B. Du Bois, and Saul Alinsky. These thinkers allow us look at how different identities and institutions are used to contest and organize against different kinds of political order. For Hobbes, political order is identical to the sovereign state, and organizing, particularly in religious institutions, is tantamount to rebellion. For Marx, order is not simply political but also economic, and the question of what role the state plays in the capitalist economic order is central to his understanding of what working-class organizing can achieve. Du Bois brings into focus the political order of the United States, which is defined by both capitalism and white supremacy, and he raises the question of how minority organizing against state-sanctioned racial capitalism relates to wider democratic aspirations. Finally, Alinsky’s approach to community organizing, which has been profoundly influential for organizers today, provides us with an agent-centric framework for thinking about how organizing confronts an unjust political order and what we, as political theorists, should take from the study of organizing. Advisors/Committee Members: Rana, Aziz (committeeMember), Livingston, Peter A (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Political science; Democratic Theory; organizing; political realism

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Phulwani, V. (2019). From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67245

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Phulwani, Vijay. “From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory .” 2019. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67245.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Phulwani, Vijay. “From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory .” 2019. Web. 10 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Phulwani V. From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67245.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Phulwani V. From Order to Organizing: Rethinking Political Realism and Democratic Theory . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67245

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Quish, Edward. Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation .

Degree: 2019, Cornell University

Emerging from a critique of the concept of “populism” in contemporary democratic theory, this dissertation develops a theory of radical democracy based on the politics of cooperative movements. I argue that cooperative politics help to clarify a central concern for democratic theory that is often obscured by theories of populism: how the popular sovereign can develop a form of social interdependence that facilitates their free and equal participation in self-government. Working through a political history of cooperative movements in the United States from the Civil War to the Cold War, my study traces a series of reformulations of the ideal of “the cooperative commonwealth,” beginning with the Populist movement and extending through the Socialist Party and the work of John Dewey and W.E.B. Du Bois. In the end, I argue that cooperative politics requires combining the local work of voluntary cooperation in multiple sites of self-organization with efforts to forge alliances among the popular classes centered on a non-exploitative vision of cooperative interdependence. Such a vision must clarify that cooperation is not simply shared instrumental activity, but a form of free association in which participants’ personal autonomy is secured by sharing in the inherently collective work of social reproduction. Cooperative movements’ reveal how the difficulty of achieving such cooperation is not a natural feature of human sociality, but an organizational defect of capitalist societies. Today, the project of cooperative democracy does not require an abstract blueprint for the cooperative commonwealth, but an archive of lessons based on the history of cooperative struggles. Advisors/Committee Members: Bensel, Richard F. (committeeMember), Rana, Aziz (committeeMember), Livingston, Peter A (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Labor relations; Populism; Democratic Theory; cooperation; cooperatives; Political science; democracy; Socialism

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Quish, E. (2019). Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67790

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Quish, Edward. “Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation .” 2019. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67790.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Quish, Edward. “Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation .” 2019. Web. 10 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Quish E. Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67790.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Quish E. Beyond Populism: Radical Democracy and the Politics of Cooperation . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67790

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

3. Vasko, Timothy Bowers. THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 .

Degree: 2018, Cornell University

This dissertation conceptualizes “native information” as both an object of governance and a process of engagements between the original inhabitants of the western hemisphere and European colonists that prefigures and produces an indigenous subject. I demonstrate this through a study of the period of colonization in the western hemisphere between the years 1492 and 1688, and the impact of colonization in the western hemisphere on the knowledge produced in the course of the late Renaissance and early Scientific Revolution. I focus especially on the interactions between the Taino and Inca and the Spanish, and also between the Roanoke and Catawba and the British during this period to illustrate my argument. Native information emerged in this context through debates over four overlapping elements that were said to characterize indigenous subjects in the Americas: Difference, Nature, Vernacular Histories, and Proprietary Identities. Native information was collected from the original inhabitants of the western hemisphere, and was curated by colonial agents so as to speak to these concerns in the late Renaissance and early Scientific Revolution. In turn, the political and legal categories that European scholars of this period developed on the basis of native information came to define and circumscribe the terms of life and death for the original inhabitants of the western hemisphere under the increasing pressure of growing colonial occupation. However, not all information with which European colonists and intellectuals were presented was treated as equally relevant. Consequently, those points where either native information was refused by Europeans or where Europeans’ attempts to enforce the indigenous status that the former claimed to flow directly from native information were sites in which the original inhabitants of the western hemisphere critically highlighted the contradictions, limits, and violences of colonial governance and its attendant systems of thought in ways that confound the indigenous subjects colonists both imagined and sought to produce. Advisors/Committee Members: Rana, Aziz (committeeMember), Taiwo, Olufemi (committeeMember), Livingston, Peter A (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: indigenous peoples; Intellectual History; international law; Political Theory; Early Modernity; Political science; Native American studies

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Vasko, T. B. (2018). THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64921

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Vasko, Timothy Bowers. “THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 .” 2018. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed August 10, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64921.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Vasko, Timothy Bowers. “THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 .” 2018. Web. 10 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Vasko TB. THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. [cited 2020 Aug 10]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64921.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Vasko TB. THE EMERGENCE OF THE INDIGENOUS SUBJECT AND EARLY-MODERN ARTS OF COLONIAL GOVERNANCE, 1492-1690 . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/64921

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.