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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Hinrichs, TJ"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Sun, Mengxi. Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital.

Degree: MA, Asian Studies, 2018, Cornell University

This paper aims to revisit cotton breeding projects undertaken by governments, industrialists, and universities between 1914 and 1926. Specifically, it seeks to explain how and why Jinling University and National Southeastern University achieved remarkable success in the early 1920s. Whereas the economic aspect of Republican China’s cotton textile manufacturing has been thoroughly discussed in existing research, little, if any, has been said on cotton breeding—the fundamental solution for agricultural inefficiency paralyzing large-scale cotton textile manufacturing. This paper seeks to fill this vacuum. It finds that, in the Beiyang era, the outcomes of cotton breeding projects depended heavily on human capital. To be more specific, U.S educated cotton experts who acquired advanced agricultural know-how were at the heart of universities’ success; governments’ efforts did not translate into satisfactory direct results, because government-owned experimental farms were not managed by personnel equipped with know-how pertaining to the cultivation of American cotton species; the outcomes obtained at cotton industrialists’ experimental farms were inadequate successes, because the amount of quality human capital available to them was inadequate. Advisors/Committee Members: Hinrichs, TJ (chair), Ratcliff, Jessica R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian history; Human Capital; Beiyang Regime; Cotton Breeding; Jinxing University; National Southeastern University; Republican China; Science history

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APA (6th Edition):

Sun, M. (2018). Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital. (Masters Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59680

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sun, Mengxi. “Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59680.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sun, Mengxi. “Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital.” 2018. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sun M. Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59680.

Council of Science Editors:

Sun M. Rediscovering Cotton Breeding in the Beiyang Era: The Cruciality of Human Capital. [Masters Thesis]. Cornell University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59680


Cornell University

2. Hong, Soo Kyeong. FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945.

Degree: PhD, History, 2017, Cornell University

This dissertation traces the history of a dietary reform movement, which sought “right eating” in early twentieth-century Japan. The movement revolved around the concept of shokuyō, which broadly referred to the art of nourishing life and vitality—yōjō—through proper eating. Its central proposition was a call for the return to “natural and traditional” foodways with a particular emphasis on the consumption of unpolished rice and largely plant-based foods. Chapter One explores how the movement and discourse of shokuyō came into being and developed as a reaction against modern transformations of Japanese society since the Meiji Restoration. It situates the shokuyō movement within the context of discourses on hygiene, health, and the overarching project of civilization and enlightenment. Although the late Meiji shokuyō advocates sought to associate its ideal diet within the boundaries of orderliness of nature and civil morality, the way to understand the relationship between food and health became increasingly overshadowed by the ascendance of institutionalized nutrition science in the 1920s. Chapter Two looks at how “efficiency” and “rationalization” became catchwords in food-related public campaigns and medical discourse in which the concept of shokuyō was superseded by that of eiyō (nutrition). In spite of this, the shokuyō movement, evolved toward another direction with a new critique of modern medicine. Chapter Three concerns this transformation by analyzing how Sakurazawa Yukikazu reconceptualized shokuyō theories as “Natural Medicine” by drawing on contemporary French critiques of biomedicine and Shinto ideology. The following two chapters trace the movement’s transformation in the 1930s from an esoteric and upper-class-centered one into a large-scale movement targeting wider sectors of society. Chapter Four looks at how the campaigners actively intervened in the wartime standardization of brown rice as the national staple in face of total war. Chapter Five on the other hand analyzes the shokuyō movement’s crusade against sugar consumption in Japanese migrants’ diets in Manchuria, showing how they attempted to bring together tenets of “eating right” and the project of Empire. This dissertation ultimately argues that shokuyō’s “traditionalist” and “natural” dietary persuasion fed into a cultural nationalist and imperialist political imagination grounded in a holistic understanding of the body, health, and environment. Advisors/Committee Members: Koschmann, Julien Victor (chair), Hinrichs, TJ (committee member), Sakai, Naoki (committee member), Hirano, Katsuya (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian history; Tradition; Body; Brown rice; Health; Nature; food; Science history

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hong, S. K. (2017). FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56934

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hong, Soo Kyeong. “FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Cornell University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56934.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hong, Soo Kyeong. “FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945.” 2017. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Hong SK. FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56934.

Council of Science Editors:

Hong SK. FOOD AS MEDICINE: THE CULTURAL POLITICS OF "EATING RIGHT" IN MODERN JAPAN, 1905-1945. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56934

3. Chia, Jack Meng-Tat. Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea.

Degree: PhD, History, 2017, Cornell University

This dissertation examines Chinese Buddhism in maritime Southeast Asia; it also considers the history of Chinese migration and transregional religious circulations in the twentieth century. I use the religious careers of three Chinese monks—Chuk Mor (Zhumo 竺摩, 1913-2002), Yen Pei (Yanpei 演培, 1917-1996), and Ashin Jinarakkhita (Tizheng 體正, 1923-2002)—as case studies to explore the movements, exchanges, and innovation of Buddhist knowledge and institutions in the Malay Archipelago. In doing so, this dissertation has two primary goals. The first is to bring Chinese Buddhism into the study of Southeast Asia and demonstrate that Chinese diasporic monks were significant agents in disseminating Buddhist ideas in maritime Southeast Asia. I highlight the transnational circulations of people, ideas, and resources between Greater China and Southeast Asia. The second goal of this dissertation is to contribute to the literature that critiques the “colonial/western transformation” model in the study of Buddhism and modernity in Asian societies, and reveal that overseas Chinese monks were important actors in making maritime Southeast Asia a site of Buddhist modernism. This study seeks to situate these Buddhist monks and their transnational networks within a broader context of Chinese migration to Southeast Asia, the Buddhist reform movement in Republican China (1912-1949), the Second World War, the emergence of Communist China in 1949, and decolonization and nation-building in Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore during the second half of the twentieth century. This study argues for the need to broaden the category of “Southeast Asian Buddhism” beyond Theravāda Buddhism on mainland Southeast Asia to include South China Sea Buddhism in the maritime region of Southeast Asia. By South China Sea Buddhism, I refer to the varied forms of Buddhism in maritime Southeast Asia that use Mandarin Chinese, Southern Chinese dialects, and Southeast Asian languages in their liturgy and scriptures. Focusing on the histories of the relationships between migratory circulations and Buddhist modernism, this study seeks to contribute to the literature on Southeast Asian and Chinese Buddhism, Southeast Asian history, Chinese history, Buddhist modernism, and Chinese diasporic networks. Advisors/Committee Members: Tagliacozzo, Eric (chair), Hinrichs, TJ (committee member), Sangren, Paul Steven (committee member), Blackburn, Anne M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Asian history; Asian studies; Chinese Buddhism; Chinese Diaspora; Maritime Southeast Asia; South China Sea Buddhism; Southeast Asian Buddhism; Buddhist Modernism; Religious history

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chia, J. M. (2017). Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56879

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chia, Jack Meng-Tat. “Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Cornell University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56879.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chia, Jack Meng-Tat. “Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea.” 2017. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Chia JM. Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56879.

Council of Science Editors:

Chia JM. Diasporic Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/56879

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