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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Eckenrode, John Joseph"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Chen, Emily. Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States .

Degree: 2012, Cornell University

Chronic pain (CP) is a prevalent and debilitating chronic condition, but nearly one in five people with CP do not consult a health care profession for their symptoms. This thesis addresses the extent and characteristics of non-consultation for CP in the United States. I develop a model of non-consultation for people reporting CP that is informed by a biopsychosocial perspective. This preliminary model proposes that symptoms, individual and social characteristics, and access to health care jointly contribute to the choice to consult a health care provider about CP. This model is tested in a large, national sample of adults, the MacArthur Study of Midlife in the United States II (MIDUS II). Results indicate that severity of pain symptoms and having health insurance are the most influential factors predicting consultation for CP. This is consistent with previous research on care-seeking for CP and theories of medical care usage that are not specific to CP. Despite the pertinence of a biopsychosocial perspective on the pain experience, measures that represented the social and psychological context of pain were not significant predictors of non-consultation for CP. Advisors/Committee Members: Eckenrode, John Joseph (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Chronic pain; medical care utilization; midus

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, E. (2012). Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29291

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Emily. “Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States .” 2012. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29291.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Emily. “Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States .” 2012. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen E. Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. [cited 2019 Jul 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29291.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen E. Characteristics Affecting Medical Consultation Or Non-Consultation For Chronic Pain In Adults In The United States . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/29291

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Chen, Emily. Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning .

Degree: 2014, Cornell University

This dissertation compiles three papers that focus on challenges in research on and practice of palliative care. The first chapter reports on a survey of 61 leading academic researchers in palliative care, who were asked their opinions on research priorities and barriers to better research in the field. Qualitative methods were used to extract the seven leading research recommendations and four barriers to better research generated by the purposively interdisciplinary group. The next two chapters use the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study to test hypotheses about the correlates and triggers of advance care planning (ACP) in older adults, cross-sectionally and, for non-planners, at a follow-up seven years later. The results presented in Chapter 2 identify several dimensions of health that are associated with formal and informal ACP cross-sectionally. Over time, changes in health have little affect on the likelihood of a non-planner completing ACP by Time 2, seven years later. In Chapter 3, I applied theory of social diffusion to ACP, hypothesizing that the planning status of a spouse or sibling would increase a non-planner's likelihood of doing planning by Time 2. The cross-sectional analysis found strong associations between spouse only and spouse and sibling status on formal and informal ACP of the focal individual, respectively. Over time, however, having a spouse or sibling with formal (but not informal) ACP affected the focal individual's likelihood of going on to do planning, but having both a spouse and sibling with formal ACP at Time 1 had an attenuating effect on the focal individual's likelihood of planning. In the final chapter I draw connections between the three research activities and suggest directions for future research. Most pressing is the need for evaluation of existing education programs to support older adults as they complete ACP and the development of novel programs targeting individuals who are least likely to engage in ACP. The growing body of academic research on factors that facilitate ACP should be translated into more effective supports for conversations about end-of-life health care. Advisors/Committee Members: Eckenrode, John Joseph (committeeMember), Eckenrode, John Joseph (committeeMember), Reid, Manney C (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: palliative care; advance care planning; end of life

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Chen, E. (2014). Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Chen, Emily. “Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning .” 2014. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Chen, Emily. “Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning .” 2014. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Chen E. Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jul 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38802.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Chen E. Understanding Academic Research Priorities And Indivdual Choices About Palliative Care And Advance Care Planning . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38802

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

3. Matthews, Jessica. Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression .

Degree: 2014, Cornell University

A longitudinal analysis of intensive interviews with 11 to 15 fifth to eighth grade girls' moral emotions in relational aggression situations was conducted and examined in relation to actions taken. Results demonstrate which moral and non-moral emotions these girls reported in real and hypothetical situations and how constellations of use of emotions change over time. Using Haidt's moral emotion families and a constructed grounded theory approach, twenty-eight total emotions were identified as used by all participants across all four years of the study, including several sub-types of anger and guilt. Close examination of moral emotions demonstrated that girls report using a variety of emotion families to think through responses to relational aggression, although connections between specific emotions and specific actions were not found. Perspective taking was the most common action reported, and most participants evidenced a desire to limit interpersonal hurt while maintaining friendships. Emotional awareness strategies were identified and were used by girls to respond to and regulate their own and others' emotions. As participants moved from fifth to eighth grade, they focused less on compassion for victims and more on avoiding anger and conflict. Although the sample size is small and middle class, the results suggest that moral emotions and emotional awareness play important roles in how girls judge and act when discussing their experiences with relational aggression. Results of this study contribute to theories regarding the interplay between moral emotions and moral judgment. Implications for future research and for interventions are proposed. Advisors/Committee Members: Hazan, Cynthia (committeeMember), Eckenrode, John Joseph (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: relational aggression; emotion; adolescent girls

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Matthews, J. (2014). Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/37079

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Matthews, Jessica. “Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression .” 2014. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/37079.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Matthews, Jessica. “Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression .” 2014. Web. 17 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Matthews J. Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jul 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/37079.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Matthews J. Moral Emotions In Adolescent Girls' Relational Aggression . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/37079

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.