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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Diabate, Naminata"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Jean-Charles, Marsha. Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America .

Degree: 2019, Cornell University

“Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women’s Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America” is a study of the impact of forced exodus from Haiti and experiences of anti-Black racism in migration for Haitian women and girls as expressed in narratives of Haitian/Haitian-American women writers. This study demonstrates that writing about coming of age during migratory processes is a genre of literature that captures the diaspora experience and offers a significant way of understanding the nature of women’s migration experiences. Throughout this work, I use the trends, experiences, and themes explored in the texts written by Edwidge Danticat, Roxane Gay, Elsie Augustave, and Ibi Zoboi to deliberate on both the politics of travel for black women and the generative spaces that provide for identity formation, political consciousness-raising, and reimagining of one’s place in the world. I introduce a concept of dyaspora saudade—combining the Brazilian notion of “saudade” with the Haitian conceptualization of “dyaspora.” Dyaspora saudade is that which also nurtures and provides similarly generative spaces where home is lost, found, contested, and restructured and healing is as much a journey as it is the goal. Lastly, I uncover the politics in these works, conceptualize Black feminist citizenship, and offer foundations on which to imagine better experiences for both marginalized migrants and citizens. This dissertation is an understanding of the revolutionary potential of these texts that involves a foundational shift in conceptions of race, womanhood, class, cosmology, and nationhood that immigration due to forced exodus catalyzes. It is an exploration of the science of this literary revolution—a revolution that interpolates Black women authors publishing in diaspora speaking for, against, and through their kindred. The goal of this literary revolution is to affect change. If struggle brings forth the best of human existence, then the stories of Black immigrant women are masterpieces in their exploration of human social issues that are prominent in contemporary societies worldwide. In my work, I endeavor to comprehend, complicate, catalog, and translate their genius. Advisors/Committee Members: Richardson, Riche D. (committeeMember), Diabate, Naminata (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Black Studies; Women's studies; Caribbean literature; Black Feminism; Black Women's Literature; Haitian Literature; Haitian Studies; Immigration Narratives; Migration Studies

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Jean-Charles, M. (2019). Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Jean-Charles, Marsha. “Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America .” 2019. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Jean-Charles, Marsha. “Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America .” 2019. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Jean-Charles M. Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67350.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Jean-Charles M. Kenbe Fem: Haitian Women's Migration Narratives and Spaces of Freedom in an Anti-Immigrant America . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/67350

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Caserta, Silvia. An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa .

Degree: 2017, Cornell University

Through a comparative analysis of contemporary literary and visual narratives that dialogue across the Mediterranean Sea, in this dissertation I apply the category of narrative to the field of Mediterranean Studies. Working across different genres, different media, and different languages, I explore the possible configuration of a Mediterranean narrative that would take into account the multiple articulations of a real and imaginary Mediterranean space. I focus on alternative narratives of migration, of the interconnection between land and sea, and of the desert, through a comparative reading of Italian literary works by Paolo Rumiz and Lina Prosa, Libyan novels by Ibrahim Al-Koni and Razan Moghrabi, video installations by the French-Algerian artist Zineb Sedira, and a short story by the Lebanese writer Emily Nasrallah. How can these narratives of and in the Mediterranean help us understand the ways in which the contemporary Mediterranean is experienced, and the role it might have to play within the current dynamics of globalization? In this dissertation, I argue that the two dimensions of living and narrating the Mediterranean cannot be separated, but that they are, rather, intimately interconnected. I show that Mediterranean narratives can provide alternative ways of thinking, conceptualizing, and ultimately experiencing the Mediterranean, both within its permeable and porous boundaries and beyond that, in the space of the global world. The narratives I put in dialogue with each other counteract a mainstream narrative of the Mediterranean as backward and immobile, when compared to Northern Europe, and as a conflict zone and a barrier, which separates Europe from the threatening Arab world. Thus, these narratives all respond to Iain Chamber’s call for “dissonant” narratives, whose “disturbing” voices are able to create the Mediterranean as a postcolonial space of agency and resistance, where alternative modernities can also be imagined. The Mediterranean that ultimately emerges from the interaction of its narrative voices is a dialogic space of differences that, while retaining their own specificities, “encounter” each other without necessarily melding. In the dichotomy that globalization proclaims between assimilation and proliferation of difference, alternative Mediterranean narratives occupy, and create, an in-between space, suspended in its unresolved, and potential, condition of liminality. Advisors/Committee Members: Melas, Natalie Anne-Marie (committeeMember), Campbell, Timothy C. (committeeMember), Diabate, Naminata (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: migration; Mediterranean; Comparative Literature; Libya; narrative; sea; Italian literature; African literature; Italy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Caserta, S. (2017). An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59001

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Caserta, Silvia. “An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa .” 2017. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed November 12, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59001.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Caserta, Silvia. “An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa .” 2017. Web. 12 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Caserta S. An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. [cited 2019 Nov 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59001.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Caserta S. An Alternative Mediterranean Space. Narratives of Movement and Resistance Across Italy and North Africa . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/59001

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.