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You searched for +publisher:"Cornell University" +contributor:("Bazarova, Natalya N"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cornell University

1. Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen. Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations .

Degree: 2013, Cornell University

This dissertation explores how participants express and interpret verbal cues of interaction involvement in dyadic conversations via text-based Instant Messaging (IM). Moreover, it seeks to discover differences in the way American participants and Chinese participants use verbal cues when they are highly, or lowly involved. Based on previous literature, interaction involvement is defined as a communication process variable, fluctuating during the social interaction under the influence of various individual and contextual factors such as the task workload, the communication style of the participant, or the communication media. I conducted two studies to test my hypotheses and research questions. The first study examined how American, and Chinese participants used verbal cues to express involvement in dyadic, textonly, IM conversations. I conducted experiments with pairs of American, and Chinese students discussing a business proposal. In this discussion, I manipulated the participants' level of involvement using a distraction task. I found that the use of personal pronouns, assent words, cognitive mechanism words, and definite articles were a significant indication of the participants' level of involvement in an IM conversation. Moreover, interaction involvement influenced cognitive and affective processes such as mutual understanding, emotions, and satisfaction in computer-mediated conversations. The second study examined how verbal cues of involvement, namely, the frequency of personal pronouns, and assent words, are perceived and interpreted by participants. I conducted an online survey in which participants had to watch four recordings of four different IM conversations between two students, who used different numbers of personal pronouns, assent words, and total number of words. I found that the use of personal pronouns and assent words affected the participants' evaluation of the students' involvement. Moreover, it influenced the participants' perception of the students' annoyingness, and the general experience the participants reported if they had been asked to work with these students. I discussed the implications of the results from these two studies to theoretical developments in computer-mediated, interpersonal, and intercultural communication research, as well as practical applications to the design of team collaboration tools. I concluded with future directions to advance research about interaction involvement and its impact on the communication process. Advisors/Committee Members: Hancock, Jeffrey T. (committeeMember), Bazarova, Natalya N (committeeMember), Wang, Qi (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: involvement; Instant Messaging; CMC conversations; Cross-culture communication

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Nguyen, T. T. D. (2013). Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34365

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen. “Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations .” 2013. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34365.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Nguyen, Thi Thao Duyen. “Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations .” 2013. Web. 16 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Nguyen TTD. Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. [cited 2019 Jul 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34365.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Nguyen TTD. Interaction Involvement In Cross-Culture Computer-Mediated Communication: Examination Of A Communication Process In Dyadic Instant Messaging Conversations . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/34365

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

2. Spottswood, Erin. Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions .

Degree: 2014, Cornell University

Nissenbaum's (2010) framework of contextual integrity contends that informational norms, which are characterized by key parameters or cues, indicate if a disclosure is appropriate to share in a given context. These cues include aspects of the context, relationship between interaction partners, attributes of the information being shared, and constraints on how information can be shared. Offline, these cues are relatively easy to identify, and help people locate and follow informational norms in their day-to-day lives. However, SNSs tend to obscure many of these cues, making it difficult for users to follow relevant informational norms on these sites. This study explored two factors that may affect participants' ability to abide by informational norms in SNS contexts. The first factor is a form of contextual cue that indicated how frequently other users had shared information on the site. The second factor is a class of primes called eye primes, in which the presence of eyes in one's visual field increases normative behavior in a wide range of settings (for review See Nettle et al., 2013). Study 1 explored what kinds of information students evaluate as appropriate versus inappropriate to disclose on a university-affiliated SNS to get a baseline understanding of the informational norms students would apply to a specific kinds of SNS. Study 2 examined how contextual cues and eye primes affected disclosure behavior and found that the contextual cues affected disclosure behavior relative to when there were no cues present, but the eye primes only affected disclosure behavior when contextual cues were also present in this context. Study 3 INFLUENCING PRIVACY explored how contextual cues and eye primes affect privacy setting decisions, and found that contextual cues affected how strict participants set their privacy settings. In addition, placing the privacy settings page before the profile page nudged participants to disclose more inappropriate information than when they filled out a profile before making privacy setting decisions. The results of these three studies suggest that contextual cues and eye primes can affect information sharing behavior on SNSs. This not only has important implications for Nissenbaum's (2010) framework of contextual integrity but also has interesting implications for Brandimarte and colleagues (2013) privacy paradox as well. Advisors/Committee Members: Ferguson, Melissa J. (committeeMember), Niederdeppe, Lee H. (committeeMember), Bazarova, Natalya N (committeeMember).

Subjects/Keywords: Privacy; Disclosure; Social Network Sites

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Spottswood, E. (2014). Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38806

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Spottswood, Erin. “Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions .” 2014. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38806.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Spottswood, Erin. “Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions .” 2014. Web. 16 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Spottswood E. Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. [cited 2019 Jul 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38806.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Spottswood E. Influecning Privacy On Social Network Sites: How Contextual Cues And Surveillance Primes Affect Disclosure Behavior And Privacy Setting Descisions . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2014. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/38806

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation


Cornell University

3. Liu, Yi-Ching. Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication .

Degree: 2016, Cornell University

Subjects/Keywords: Attribution theory; Group motivation loss; Free-riding

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Liu, Y. (2016). Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication . (Thesis). Cornell University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/1813/45395

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Liu, Yi-Ching. “Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication .” 2016. Thesis, Cornell University. Accessed July 16, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/1813/45395.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Liu, Yi-Ching. “Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication .” 2016. Web. 16 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Liu Y. Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication . [Internet] [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. [cited 2019 Jul 16]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/45395.

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

Council of Science Editors:

Liu Y. Peer Responses To The Bad Apple In Project Teams: From Attribution To Communication . [Thesis]. Cornell University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/1813/45395

Note: this citation may be lacking information needed for this citation format:
Not specified: Masters Thesis or Doctoral Dissertation

.