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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Winokur, Marc"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Cornelis, Hope M. Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Human Development and Family Studies, 2017, Colorado State University

Sexual violence (SV) is a pervasive crime that disproportionately affects young people. Despite the need for SV prevention initiatives with young adolescents, a majority of documented efforts to understand and prevent SV have targeted college-aged individuals. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Speak Up!, an intensive, school-based, gender-separated SV prevention program for middle school youth. The evaluation utilized pre and post-test data from 76 students, aged 11-15, who participated in Speak Up! during the 2014-2015 academic year. Participants completed self-report surveys, developed by the implementing organization, at baseline and immediately after the intervention. The survey measure assessed participants' adherence to unhealthy relationship/sexual norms, self-efficacy for bystander intervention, and rigidity in gender ideology. Main effects and moderating associations were examined using repeated measures analyses of covariance (RM ACOVAs) and Cohen's d effect size estimates comparing participants' pre and post-test mean scores. Results revealed significant improvements in participants' adherence to unhealthy relationship/sexual norms from pre to post-test, regardless of implementation modifications and gender. Additionally, findings indicated that girls showed greater pre-post changes on the outcomes than did boys (marginally significant). Although strong conclusions about program impact could not be derived due to study limitations, this study illuminates the promise of SV prevention with youth and the need for further exploration of how to effectively prevent SV with this population. Advisors/Committee Members: Riggs, Nathaniel (advisor), Haddock, Shelley (committee member), Winokur, Marc (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: intervention; sexual assault; youth; prevention; adolescence; sexual violence

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APA (6th Edition):

Cornelis, H. M. (2017). Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181360

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Cornelis, Hope M. “Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181360.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Cornelis, Hope M. “Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth.” 2017. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Cornelis HM. Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181360.

Council of Science Editors:

Cornelis HM. Evaluation of Speak Up!: a sexual violence prevention program for middle school youth. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181360


Colorado State University

2. Sullivan, Ann. Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth.

Degree: PhD, Social Work, 2018, Colorado State University

Children who have experienced abuse or neglect enter into the complex child welfare and legal systems. The court determines the needs and the consequences to the family members involved as well as the best interest of the child including, at times, where the child will reside. Dependency court is a complex process that involves many hearings as well as multiple child welfare professionals serving in differing roles. In all of this, there are very few legal protections for children or youth throughout the child welfare and judicial processes. Federal law was passed to support youth opportunity to be consulted with, in an age appropriate manner, regarding in permanency and transition hearings. (42 U.S.C. 675(5)(C). Currently, there are not consistent practiced between dependency court judicial officers pertaining to youth participation in court proceedings. In addition to differing opportunities for youth to access due process participation, challenges to youth inclusion exist because of logistical barriers as well as concerns of the best interest of the youth. The purpose of this convergent mixed methods study was to both explore youth perceptions and experiences through individual survey and focus group discussion as well as, to gather in-depth interview information from dependency court judicial officers. The qualitative findings obtained from judicial officer interviews described judicial officer perspectives and considerations about youth participation at hearings. The convergent study design supported compiling of feedback from two distinct groups to better understand and describe issues related to youth attendance at dependency court as well as obtain recommendations for future court practices. Both youth and judicial officers identified important benefits to youth inclusion in court proceedings. Both groups indicated that youth should be provided options for the manner that they would choose to participate in the court hearing and that the youth's wishes should guide how the youth make their opinions known to the court. Additionally, both youth and judicial officers recognized that youth inclusion in court proceedings has the potential to empower youth and to inform the court when implemented thoughtfully. However, if not implemented with care, some youth risk being further harmed through inclusion in court proceedings. Judicial officers identified the need for leadership and collaborative planning with child welfare professionals to advance practice changes that expand opportunities for youth participation at dependency court hearings Advisors/Committee Members: Buchan, Victoria (advisor), Tungate, Susan (committee member), Unnithan, Prabha (committee member), Winokur, Marc (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: child welfare; dependency and neglect; attendance; youth participation; court

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Sullivan, A. (2018). Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189270

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Sullivan, Ann. “Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189270.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Sullivan, Ann. “Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth.” 2018. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Sullivan A. Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189270.

Council of Science Editors:

Sullivan A. Youth attendance at dependency court proceedings: a mixed methods study of judicial officers and youth. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189270

3. Drake, Matthew B. Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2015, Colorado State University

Research on stay-at-home dads (SAHDs) has not kept pace with the increase in the trend and is lacking the in-depth description of their lived experience. The purpose of this narrative inquiry was to describe and thereby better understand the lived experience of SAHDs and how they make meaning within the role. Narrative inquiry works to restory the stories of the participants by gathering data, analyzing it, searching for themes, and rewriting it in a sequence that makes sense. In this study, in order to fully examine the lived experience of SAHDs, I encompassed a constructivist paradigm, which allowed for the evolution of the meaning and process. I realize that my participation altered the reality of the experience and that the stories that I present only captured brief moments of time; however, I drew heavily upon my therapeutic and clinical backgrounds to create a warm and compassionate environment which guided the way for an inductive exploration into each dad's lived experience. I primarily used unstructured interviews that focused more on Rogerian therapeutic principles than direct Socratic questioning; however, I maintained boundaries which provided focus, shape, and scope. These unstructured interviews provided the space for the participants to talk freely and openly as I obtained very rich quotations from each dad which I have presented within the narratives. By including these excerpts, often in their entirety, I maintain the integrity of the process, meaning making, and authenticity of each individual story. This narrative inquiry contains the lived experience of four SAHDs, ending with my own account. Each dad's narrative is presented individually, uniquely, and told in its entirety followed by my holistic content analysis which explores the themes of both the inner and outer world of each dad as embodied by his past, present, and possibility of the future. By doing so, this study gave voice to the SAHD experience and opened doors for future research and understanding. The individual and cumulative effects of the narratives have provided avenues for understanding for readers to make their personal meaning of the lived experience of SAHDs. I have also provided recommendations for clinicians who are working with SAHDs or their families. I conclude with my journey through this qualitative inquiry and a brief letter to SAHDs. Advisors/Committee Members: Davies, Timothy (advisor), Hall, Bruce (committee member), Makela, Carole (committee member), Winokur, Marc (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: dads; family; fathers; masculinity; stay-at-home

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Drake, M. B. (2015). Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170346

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Drake, Matthew B. “Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170346.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Drake, Matthew B. “Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The.” 2015. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Drake MB. Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170346.

Council of Science Editors:

Drake MB. Lived experience of stay-at-home dads: a narrative inquiry, The. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170346

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