Advanced search options

Advanced Search Options 🞨

Browse by author name (“Author name starts with…”).

Find ETDs with:

in
/  
in
/  
in
/  
in

Written in Published in Earliest date Latest date

Sorted by

Results per page:

Sorted by: relevance · author · university · dateNew search

You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Shelley, Tara O\'Connor"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

Search Limiters

Last 2 Years | English Only

No search limiters apply to these results.

▼ Search Limiters


Colorado State University

1. Mayer, Adam. Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans.

Degree: PhD, Sociology, 2017, Colorado State University

Unconventional oil and gas extraction, primarily via hydraulic fracturing ("fracking"), has changed the energy landscape in the United States. The policy regime currently governing fracking is a complex patchwork in which state regulators have the primary authority. Social scientists have thoroughly documented general beliefs and risk perceptions related to fracking there is a lack of policy-related research. This dissertation examined public policy preferences for fracking regulation using a survey data from a statewide sample of Coloradoans. Theoretically, it was hypothesized that policy support hinged upon factors like risk perceptions, benefit perceptions, place attachment, community economic identity and political ideology. Overall, risk perceptions and political ideology emerged as relatively consistent and powerful predictors of support for unconventional oil and gas regulatory policy. On the other hand, several possible predictors had little to no role. Benefit perceptions had little effect on any policy dependent variable. Further, community economic identity and place attachment played very little role. I discuss policy implications and directions for future research. Advisors/Committee Members: Shelley, Tara O'Connor (advisor), Malin, Stephanie (committee member), Lacy, Mike (committee member), Loomis, John (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: fracking; risk perception; political identity; contingent valuation

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Mayer, A. (2017). Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181374

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Mayer, Adam. “Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181374.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Mayer, Adam. “Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans.” 2017. Web. 19 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Mayer A. Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Aug 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181374.

Council of Science Editors:

Mayer A. Risk, place and oil and gas policy preferences among Coloradoans. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/181374


Colorado State University

2. Watne, Zachary Patrick. What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Sociology, 2007, Colorado State University

Previous literature on voluntary initiatives indicates that companies are more likely to join if they are large, diverse, profitable and are experiencing more regulatory oversight. While these findings are interesting, they have yet to be replicated among a sample of United States companies in the case of the United Nations Global Compact. Thus, this study draws upon corporate social responsibility literature as it relates to the United Nation's Global Compact to explore the relationship between Global Compact participation, company characteristics, regulatory oversight, and regulatory violations. The data for this analysis comes from the United Nations Global Compact Office, the United States Securities and Exchange Commission EDGAR database, the Environmental Protection Agency's Enforcement & Compliance History Online Database, the Dun & Bradstreet Million Dollar Database, Reference USA, along with selected corporate websites. The sample consists of 70 companies that joined the Global Compact and 70 companies that did not join the Global Compact. Logistic regression analysis suggests that the number of Securities and Exchange Commission litigation documents filed against each company increases the likelihood of Global Compact participation, as does the size of the company (seen with both sales totals and employees per company); additionally, companies based in manufacturing are also more likely to sign into the Global Compact. Surprisingly, previous environmental compliance was not associated with participation in the Global Compact. This finding suggests that U.S. companies that join the Global Compact are not "good" or "bad" environmental actors. This study is unique in that findings suggest companies that join the Global Compact appear to be driven primarily by economic regulation as opposed to environmental regulation. Advisors/Committee Members: Stretesky, Paul (advisor), Shelley, Tara O'Connor (committee member), Stevis, Dimitris (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: voluntary initiatives; compliance; regulation; global compact; corporate social responsibility; United Nations; Social responsibility of business  – United States; Global Compact; International business enterprises  – Moral and ethical aspects; Corporate culture  – United States

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Watne, Z. P. (2007). What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45974

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Watne, Zachary Patrick. “What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed August 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45974.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Watne, Zachary Patrick. “What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches.” 2007. Web. 19 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Watne ZP. What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Aug 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45974.

Council of Science Editors:

Watne ZP. What types of U.S. companies join the United Nations Global Compact? : an empirical analysis of voluntary initiative engagement comparing the competitive advantage, regulatory avoidance, and new moral marketplace approaches. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/45974


Colorado State University

3. Tullis, Matthew Thomas. Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2007, Colorado State University

This research explores whether perceptions of environmental risk influences support for social control measures, with specific reference to violations of the Clean Air Act. Drawing on national survey data collected between April and September of 2013, the research assesses whether environmental risk perception affects support for social control measures in the form of regulation and punishment. Risk perception is measured using a risk theory developed by Robert O'Connor, Richard J. Bord, and Ann Fisher (1999), which includes three components: 1) problem awareness, 2) negative consequences to be experienced by oneself and others, and 3) knowledge of the causes of the problem. The research findings indicate that perceived negative consequences to self and/or others and knowledge of the causes of the problem are significant predictors of regulatory support while problem awareness was not. Two of the three forms of risk were generally not relevant for understanding public support of punishment in response to corporate environmental crime. The notable exception was negative consequences to self and others, where people who favored stricter forms of punishment were those who perceived the most negative consequences associated with air pollution. In sum, it appears that O'Connor et al. (1999) risk perception theory is salient for understanding regulation but only partially relevant for understanding punishment preferences for environmental corporate crime. Advisors/Committee Members: Shelley, Tara O'Connor (advisor), Hogan, Michael (committee member), Davis, Charles (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Clean Air Act; risk; green criminology; environmental attitudes; corporate violations

Record DetailsSimilar RecordsGoogle PlusoneFacebookTwitterCiteULikeMendeleyreddit

APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Tullis, M. T. (2007). Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/84565

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Tullis, Matthew Thomas. “Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed August 19, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/84565.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Tullis, Matthew Thomas. “Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act.” 2007. Web. 19 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Tullis MT. Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Aug 19]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/84565.

Council of Science Editors:

Tullis MT. Risky air : an analysis of risk perceptions, punitive attitudes, and regulatory support towards corporate violations of the Clean Air Act. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/84565

.