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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Rittenhouse, Larry"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Battle, David C. Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Forest and Rangeland Stewardship, 2016, Colorado State University

Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson (JBER), which is a combined United States Army/Air Force installation, and neighboring Anchorage, Alaska, support a population of moose Alces alces (Linnaeus, 1758) that inhabit a fragmented landscape of habitat types interspersed with human development. Because development plans in support of the military mission may have significant impacts on moose movement in the area, JBER and Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) biologists began a study of moose habitat use and behavior on JBER. In order to help identify behaviors in wild radio-collared moose captured on JBER, we tested Telonics tri-axial accelerometers for accuracy in the detection of activity and the identification of behaviors in radio-collared moose. Direct observations of three captive animals fitted with radio collars containing accelerometers allowed us to calibrate activity readings to observed behaviors. We developed four datasets in order to test whether readings from this type of accelerometer could identify specific behaviors (browsing, grazing, walking, standing, lying), behavior categories (feeding, traveling, resting), or simply when moose were active or inactive. Multiple threshold criteria were tested in order to maximize correlation to observed behaviors. The highest overall accuracy was achieved when using threshold criteria to characterize behaviors as active (92.29% accuracy) or inactive (90.64% accuracy). A Fisher’s Exact Test indicated that there was no significant difference between observed behaviors and those correctly classified using threshold criteria for either active (p = .9728) or inactive (p = .9431) behaviors, indicating that our threshold criteria is correctly classifying these behaviors. In the next phase of this study, we collected 244,957 GPS locations from 18 female moose captured on JBER and fitted with GPS collars equipped with the same model tri-axial accelerometer used in the captive trials. Data from the accelerometers were used to characterize moose behavior as active or inactive. GPS locations, along with behavior patterns and movement characteristics, were used to rank JBER habitat types. Turning angle and speed were calculated between successive locations for each animal across the animal’s home range. Values were pooled for all animals and used to assess movement characteristics by season and habitat type. The highest velocity recorded for a 60 minute period was 1.50 m/s (5.40 kph), and 99.50% of all steps had velocities < 0.26 m/s (0.94 kph). Turning angle groups did not vary among either habitat types (p = 1.00) or seasons (p = 0.99). A new, intuitive home range estimation method, Dynamic Potential Path Area (dynPPA), was used to incorporate behavioral states into the delineation of animal home ranges. We delineated dynPPA home ranges by season for each moose, and used this technique in combination with Jacobs Index (which measures utilization in relation to availability) to determine habitat preference. Seasonal dynPPA home range sizes averaged 15.28 km2 in… Advisors/Committee Members: Rittenhouse, Larry (advisor), Farley, Sean (advisor), Meiman, Paul (committee member), Peel, Kraig (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: alces; habitat use; moose; dynamic potential path area; Alaska; Jacob's Index

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Battle, D. C. (2016). Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173501

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Battle, David C. “Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173501.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Battle, David C. “Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK.” 2016. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Battle DC. Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173501.

Council of Science Editors:

Battle DC. Movement patterns, behavior, and habitat use of female moose on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, AK. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/173501


Colorado State University

2. White, Boyd Winston. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, 2009, Colorado State University

This study was designed to validate the use of Geological Information Systems (GIS) for creating a predictive habitat model that produces raster maps of acceptable habitats for Burrowing Owls, Athene cunicularia (ATCU). The model was designed to locate ATCU habitat for long-term monitoring purposes at U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground. ArcGIS 9 was used to manipulate data from three data layers: Southwest Regional Gap Analysis vegetation layer, slope data, and proximity to edge. A weighted index was assigned to individual pixels. The weighted index was a product of the weighting factors (0.45, 0.35, and 0.25 for vegetation types, slope and proximity, respectively times the index (3, 2, 1, 0 for excellent, fair, poor and non-habitat, respectively). The display layer was the sum of the weighted layers. The display was Excellent, Fair, Poor and Non- Habitat. Visual and auditory field observations were conducted in each of the four habitat delineations to validate the models predictive capability. In conclusion, we could not discriminate Excellent, Fair, Poor, or Non-habitat, based on the two proportions test and the Z-statistic at the 80% Confidence Interval. Validation was hampered by the low incidence of ATCU sightings in the 2008 season. Advisors/Committee Members: Rittenhouse, Larry R. (advisor), Bunnell, Kevin D. (advisor), Woodmansee, Robert George (committee member), Peel, Kraig R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground; DPG; burrowing owls; ATCU; habitat; geological information systems; GIS; Burrowing owl  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Habitat (Ecology)  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Geographic information systems  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Athene cunicularia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, B. W. (2009). Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Boyd Winston. “Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Boyd Winston. “Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.” 2009. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

White BW. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103.

Council of Science Editors:

White BW. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103


Colorado State University

3. Stillwell, Mark A. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.

Degree: PhD, Range Science, 1983, Colorado State University

Free grazing ungulates were hypothesized to exert a significant influence on the nitrogen cycle of a grazed shortgrass prairie ecosystem. Two field studies were performed from May 1980 through March 1982 in shortgrass prairie pastures at the Central Plains Experimental Range northeast of Fort Collins, Colorado. The objective of the first study was to quantify seasonal variation in nitrogen ingested by free grazing heifers and the partitioning of the ingested nitrogen among urine, feces, and storage in animal bodies. A herd of eight yearling heifers in a 125 ha. pasture consumed 116 kg of forage nitrogen during the growing season and 91 kg of forage nitrogen during the dormant season. This was only 10% of peak standing crop of forage nitrogen. Ten percent of the nitrogen ingested during the study period was incorporated into body growth. Excreted nitrogen was partitioned between urine and feces at 54% and 46% for the growing season and 45% and 55% for the dormant season. This was a deposition rate of 1.6 kg N/ ha. for the pasture. The objective of the second field study was to determine the fate of urinary nitrogen once it was returned to various soils in a pasture. Simulated urine with l5N labeled urea was added at the rate of 45 g/m² to the soil at three sites on a catena. Urea hydrolysis was rapid at all sites with little urea remaining after four days. Over a 15 month period a sandy ridgetop and a clay swale soil retained about 70% of the added nitrogen. Only 40% was recovered from a midslope soil. Elevated calcium levels in the ridgetop and high clay content in the swale soil were important in the conservation of nitrogen. Cattle grazing was shown to be important in the N cycle by processing 10% of the standing N and depositing it in concentrated spots on the soil. Long term effects indicate that up to 50% of a community may be affected at any time. Advisors/Committee Members: Woodmansee, Robert G. (advisor), Rittenhouse, Larry R. (committee member), Parton, William J. (committee member), Porter, Lynn K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Grassland ecology; Nitrogen cycle; Nitrogen excretion; Cattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stillwell, M. A. (1983). Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stillwell, Mark A. “Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.” 1983. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stillwell, Mark A. “Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.” 1983. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Stillwell MA. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 1983. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806.

Council of Science Editors:

Stillwell MA. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 1983. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806

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