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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Rittenhouse, Larry R."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. White, Boyd Winston. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Forest, Rangeland, and Watershed Stewardship, 2009, Colorado State University

This study was designed to validate the use of Geological Information Systems (GIS) for creating a predictive habitat model that produces raster maps of acceptable habitats for Burrowing Owls, Athene cunicularia (ATCU). The model was designed to locate ATCU habitat for long-term monitoring purposes at U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground. ArcGIS 9 was used to manipulate data from three data layers: Southwest Regional Gap Analysis vegetation layer, slope data, and proximity to edge. A weighted index was assigned to individual pixels. The weighted index was a product of the weighting factors (0.45, 0.35, and 0.25 for vegetation types, slope and proximity, respectively times the index (3, 2, 1, 0 for excellent, fair, poor and non-habitat, respectively). The display layer was the sum of the weighted layers. The display was Excellent, Fair, Poor and Non- Habitat. Visual and auditory field observations were conducted in each of the four habitat delineations to validate the models predictive capability. In conclusion, we could not discriminate Excellent, Fair, Poor, or Non-habitat, based on the two proportions test and the Z-statistic at the 80% Confidence Interval. Validation was hampered by the low incidence of ATCU sightings in the 2008 season. Advisors/Committee Members: Rittenhouse, Larry R. (advisor), Bunnell, Kevin D. (advisor), Woodmansee, Robert George (committee member), Peel, Kraig R. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: U.S. Army Dugway Proving Ground; DPG; burrowing owls; ATCU; habitat; geological information systems; GIS; Burrowing owl  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Habitat (Ecology)  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Geographic information systems  – Dugway Proving Ground (Utah); Athene cunicularia

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

White, B. W. (2009). Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

White, Boyd Winston. “Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

White, Boyd Winston. “Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground.” 2009. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

White BW. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103.

Council of Science Editors:

White BW. Validation of a geographic information system predictive habitat model for burrowing owls (Athene cunicularia) at US Army, Dugway Proving Ground. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/22103


Colorado State University

2. Stillwell, Mark A. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.

Degree: PhD, Range Science, 1983, Colorado State University

Free grazing ungulates were hypothesized to exert a significant influence on the nitrogen cycle of a grazed shortgrass prairie ecosystem. Two field studies were performed from May 1980 through March 1982 in shortgrass prairie pastures at the Central Plains Experimental Range northeast of Fort Collins, Colorado. The objective of the first study was to quantify seasonal variation in nitrogen ingested by free grazing heifers and the partitioning of the ingested nitrogen among urine, feces, and storage in animal bodies. A herd of eight yearling heifers in a 125 ha. pasture consumed 116 kg of forage nitrogen during the growing season and 91 kg of forage nitrogen during the dormant season. This was only 10% of peak standing crop of forage nitrogen. Ten percent of the nitrogen ingested during the study period was incorporated into body growth. Excreted nitrogen was partitioned between urine and feces at 54% and 46% for the growing season and 45% and 55% for the dormant season. This was a deposition rate of 1.6 kg N/ ha. for the pasture. The objective of the second field study was to determine the fate of urinary nitrogen once it was returned to various soils in a pasture. Simulated urine with l5N labeled urea was added at the rate of 45 g/m² to the soil at three sites on a catena. Urea hydrolysis was rapid at all sites with little urea remaining after four days. Over a 15 month period a sandy ridgetop and a clay swale soil retained about 70% of the added nitrogen. Only 40% was recovered from a midslope soil. Elevated calcium levels in the ridgetop and high clay content in the swale soil were important in the conservation of nitrogen. Cattle grazing was shown to be important in the N cycle by processing 10% of the standing N and depositing it in concentrated spots on the soil. Long term effects indicate that up to 50% of a community may be affected at any time. Advisors/Committee Members: Woodmansee, Robert G. (advisor), Rittenhouse, Larry R. (committee member), Parton, William J. (committee member), Porter, Lynn K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Grassland ecology; Nitrogen cycle; Nitrogen excretion; Cattle

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Stillwell, M. A. (1983). Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stillwell, Mark A. “Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.” 1983. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed April 11, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stillwell, Mark A. “Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie.” 1983. Web. 11 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Stillwell MA. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 1983. [cited 2021 Apr 11]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806.

Council of Science Editors:

Stillwell MA. Effects of bovine urinary nitrogen on the nitrogen cycle of a shortgrass prairie. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 1983. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/172806

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