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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Ray, Indrajit, 1966-"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Zaliva, Vadim. Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Computer Science, 2009, Colorado State University

Treating modern firewall policy languages as imperative, special purpose programming languages, in this thesis we will try to apply static code analysis techniques for the purpose of anomaly detection. We will first abstract a policy in common firewall policy language into an intermediate language, and then we will try to apply anomaly detection algorithms to it. The contributions made by this thesis are: 1. An analysis of various control flow instructions in popular firewall policy languages 2. Introduction of an intermediate firewall policy language, with emphasis on control flow constructs. 3. Application of Static Code Analysis to detect anomalies in firewall policy, expressed in intermediate firewall policy language. 4. Sample implementation of Static Code Analysis of firewall policies, expressed in our abstract language using Datalog language. Advisors/Committee Members: Ray, Indrajit, 1966- (advisor), Turk, Daniel E. (committee member), Ray, Indrakshi (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: datalog language; firewall policy language; anomaly detection algorithms; static code analysis; Firewalls (Computer security)  – Programming; Anomaly detection (Computer security)  – Programming

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zaliva, V. (2009). Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/28638

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zaliva, Vadim. “Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection.” 2009. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/28638.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zaliva, Vadim. “Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection.” 2009. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Zaliva V. Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/28638.

Council of Science Editors:

Zaliva V. Applying static code analysis to firewall policies for the purpose of anomaly detection. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2009. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/28638


Colorado State University

2. Toahchoodee, Manachai. Access control models for pervasive computing environments.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2010, Colorado State University

With the growing advancement of pervasive computing technologies, we are moving towards an era where context information will be necessary for access control. Traditional access control models like Mandatory Access Control (MAC), Discretionary Access Control (DAC), and Role-Based Access Control (RBAC) do not work well in this scenario for several reasons. First, unlike traditional applications, pervasive computing applications usually do not have well-defined security perimeter-the entities an application will interact with or the resources that will be accessed may not be known in advance. Second, these applications are also dynamic in nature – the accessing entities may change, resources requiring protection may be created or modified, and an entity's access to resources may change during the course of the application, which make the resources protection during application execution extremely challenging. Third, pervasive computing applications use the knowledge of surrounding physical spaces to provide services; security policies designed for such applications must therefore use contextual information. Thus, new access control models and technologies are needed for pervasive computing applications. In this dissertation, we propose two types of access control models for pervasive computing environments; one determine the accessibility based on the spatio-temporal constraints, and the other determine the accessibility based on the trustworthiness of the entities. The different features of access control models may interact in subtle ways resulting in conflicts. Consequently, it is important to analyze and understand these models before they are widely deployed. The other contribution of this dissertation is to verify the correctness of the model. The results obtained by analyzing the access control models will enable the users of the model to make informed decisions. Toward this end, we propose automated verification techniques for our access control models. Advisors/Committee Members: Ray, Indrakshi (advisor), McConnell, Ross M. (committee member), Ray, Indrajit, 1966- (committee member), Hayne, Stephen (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: data security; RBAC; pervasive computing; computer security; access control model for pervasive computing; access control model; Ubiquitous computing; Context-aware computing; Computers  – Access control; Computer security

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Toahchoodee, M. (2010). Access control models for pervasive computing environments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39107

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Toahchoodee, Manachai. “Access control models for pervasive computing environments.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39107.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Toahchoodee, Manachai. “Access control models for pervasive computing environments.” 2010. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Toahchoodee M. Access control models for pervasive computing environments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39107.

Council of Science Editors:

Toahchoodee M. Access control models for pervasive computing environments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/39107


Colorado State University

3. Dewri, Rinku. Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management.

Degree: PhD, Computer Science, 2010, Colorado State University

The past few years have witnessed an overwhelming amount of research in the field of information security and privacy. An encouraging outcome of this research is the vast accumulation of theoretical models that help to capture the various threats that persistently hinder the best possible usage of today's powerful communication infrastructure. While theoretical models are essential to understanding the impact of any breakdown in the infrastructure, they are of limited application if the underlying business centric view is ignored. Information management in this context is the strategic management of the infrastructure, incorporating the knowledge about causes and consequences to arrive at the right balance between risk and profit. Modern information management systems are home to a vast repository of sensitive personal information. While these systems depend on quality data to boost the Quality of Service (QoS), they also run the risk of violating privacy regulations. The presence of network vulnerabilities also weaken these systems since security policies cannot always be enforced to prevent all forms of exploitation. This problem is more strongly grounded in the insufficient availability of resources, rather than the inability to predict zero-day attacks. System resources also impact the availability of access to information, which in itself is becoming more and more ubiquitous day by day. Information access times in such ubiquitous environments must be maintained within a specified QoS level. In short, modern information management must consider the mutual interactions between risks, resources and services to achieve wide scale acceptance. This dissertation explores these problems in the context of three important domains, namely disclosure control, security risk management and wireless data broadcasting. Research in these domains has been put together under the umbrella of multi-criteria decision making to signify that "business survival" is an equally important factor to consider while analyzing risks and providing solutions for their resolution. We emphasize that businesses are always bound by constraints in their effort to mitigate risks and therefore benefit the most from a framework that allows the exploration of solutions that abide by the constraints. Towards this end, we revisit the optimization problems being solved in these domains and argue that they oversee the underlying cost-benefit relationship. Our approach in this work is motivated by the inherent multi-objective nature of the problems. We propose formulations that help expose the cost-benefit relationship across the different objectives that must be met in these problems. Such an analysis provides a decision maker with the necessary information to make an informed decision on the impact of choosing a control measure over the business goals of an organization. The theories and tools necessary to perform this analysis are introduced to the community. Advisors/Committee Members: Whitley, L. Darrell (advisor), Ray, Indrajit, 1966- (advisor), Ray, Indrakshi (committee member), Siegel, Howard Jay (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Information management; data broadcasting; multi-objective optimization; information security and privacy; Computer networks  – Security measures; Computer security; Multiple criteria decision making

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dewri, R. (2010). Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/40284

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dewri, Rinku. “Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management.” 2010. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 26, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/40284.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dewri, Rinku. “Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management.” 2010. Web. 26 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Dewri R. Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2010. [cited 2021 Jan 26]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/40284.

Council of Science Editors:

Dewri R. Multi-criteria analysis in modern information management. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2010. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/40284

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