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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Lodha, Neha"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Swanson, Clayton W. Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Health and Exercise Science, 2018, Colorado State University

Interlimb coordination and mobility (postural sway and turning) diminish with age, posing a risk for gait-related injuries. Further, levels of inhibition within the motor cortex are significantly associated with coordination of the upper extremities in healthy aging, however, it is unknown if this same association exists for lower extremity control. To investigate the relationship between gait coordination and cortical inhibition we measured gait coordination via the phase coordination index and motor cortex inhibition via the cortical silent period in 14 young and 15 older adults. Gait coordination was reduced in older adults across a variety of walking conditions, as was cortical inhibition, solely in the non-dominant motor cortex. Furthermore, young adults were better able to maintain lower extremity coordination and variability with reduced cortical inhibition, whereas older adults with increased cortical inhibition demonstrated better walking performance. These findings suggest a fundamental shift in the relationship between motor cortex inhibition and lower extremity control with age, similar to previous work demonstrating an age-related difference in the association between motor cortex inhibition with bimanual control. Advisors/Committee Members: Fling, Brett W. (advisor), Lodha, Neha (committee member), Burzynska, Agnieszka (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: cortical silent period; phase coordination index; aging; TMS; inhibition

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Swanson, C. W. (2018). Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191331

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Swanson, Clayton W. “Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191331.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Swanson, Clayton W. “Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults.” 2018. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Swanson CW. Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191331.

Council of Science Editors:

Swanson CW. Associations between gait coordination, variability and motor cortex inhibition in young and older adults. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191331


Colorado State University

2. Zablocki, Victoria. Sex differences in reactive driving with aging.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Health and Exercise Science, 2018, Colorado State University

Driving is a complex task that requires integration of perceptual and motor abilities. Age-related changes in perceptual motor abilities contribute towards driving deficits in older adults. Whether driving deficits in older adults are influenced by sex-differences is unknown. Purpose: Therefore, the purpose of this study was 1) to determine sex differences in reactive driving performance with advancing age and 2) to identify the differences in reactive driving strategies between older males and females. We tested reactive driving performance in a simulated environment that focuses on reactive driving. Reactive driving is a key component of car following task and involves responding to an unexpected environmental stimuli with fast and precise movements. Methods: Older male (N=12; age= 65.18 ± 7.19 yrs.) and older female (N=12; age= 66.25± 11.96 yrs.) adults performed a reactive driving task. All participants were right limb dominant and performed the simulated driving task with the right leg. We quantified reactive driving performance with the total response time, as the time from the onset of visual stimulus (brake lights of the car ahead) to application of brake force. To determine the contribution of perceptual ability (visual information processing speed), we quantified the pre-motor response time as the time from the onset of the visual stimulus to the activation of tibialis anterior. To determine the contribution of the motor ability (movement preparation and execution speed) to reactive driving performance, we quantified the motor response time as the time from the activation of tibialis anterior to the brake force onset. Results: The total response time was not significantly different between older male and older female adults (|t22| = -.17; p > 0.05). The pre-motor response time was significantly longer in older females as compared with the older males (|t22| = 2.91; p < .01). In contrast, the motor response time was significantly shorter in older females compared with the older males (|t22| = -2.52; p < .01). The group differences in premotor and motor response times were not influenced by strength or motor variability. Conclusion: Older male and older female adults demonstrate comparable total response time on a reactive driving task. These findings suggest an absence of sex related differences in reactive driving with advancing age. This study provides novel evidence that older male and female adults adopt different strategies for reactive driving. While older males show reduced speed of movement preparation and execution compared with older females, older females show reduced speed of visual information processing relative to older males. Thus, driving rehabilitation must focus on targeting sex specific deficits for enhancing driving function in older adults. Advisors/Committee Members: Lodha, Neha (advisor), Tracy, Brian L. (committee member), Malcolm, Matthew P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: motor impairments; driving; older adults

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zablocki, V. (2018). Sex differences in reactive driving with aging. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191402

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zablocki, Victoria. “Sex differences in reactive driving with aging.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed November 29, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191402.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zablocki, Victoria. “Sex differences in reactive driving with aging.” 2018. Web. 29 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Zablocki V. Sex differences in reactive driving with aging. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 29]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191402.

Council of Science Editors:

Zablocki V. Sex differences in reactive driving with aging. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191402

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