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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Krishnan, Sarada"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Zaid, Salah E. Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.).

Degree: PhD, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, 2020, Colorado State University

The date palm, Phoenix dactylifera L. is the notable palm which produces a nutrient-rich edible fruit (the date), well known for its unique attributes of medicine and healthy energy. It is a species that has been cultivated since early civilizations in the fertile crescent and later in the Middle East. It is typically cloned with many cultivars (over 3000). A means of accurately identifying specific clones and an understanding of the relationships among major commercial cultivars would provide valuable information for the maintenance, potentially an improvement and continued conservation of superior genotypes. Phylogenetic relationships amid commercial date cultivars are poorly understood, despite their importance. This research aimed at providing applicable knowledge through an expedient technique, by developing an exclusively tailored Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) panel, custom-made for date palm fingerprinting and molecular identification also named as 'Dates PalmàPrinting'. This assembled modified genotyping by microsatellite markers provides a standardized approach to cultivar identification and a quality control application in date palm micropropagation production. A deeper understanding and relationship of today's major commercial cultivars is incomplete. Improving the development and productivity of this tree species is restricted due to few genetic resources. Only regionally narrowed studies have been conducted but it is more important to have a broader base of such knowledge. The present research reports on 20 selected, commercially important date palm cultivars, consisting of 18 females and 2 males, which are grown throughout the world. The knowledge of relationships among these cultivars is needed, although the date palm genome has been mostly sequenced (90.2 %) with 41,660 gene models representing an 82,354 scaffold. The relationships among the major cultivars remain unclear. Presently, the information on the characterization of these cultivars requires an assessment to better understand the relationships among the superior genotypes. The use of microsatellites, due to their accuracy and high polymorphic capability, have led to fine scaled phylogenies. The phylogenetic relationships were determined using neighbor joining un-rooted trees correlated with genetic structure clustering. Primer selections were achieved from evaluation of 14 nuclear SSR loci isolated from P. dactylifera. Results revealed a high degree of polymorphism observed in the 20 cultivars with fewer common alleles than anticipated. Within the cultivars studied, a broad heterozygosity across base pair (bp) amplification data has led to an understanding of limited inbreeding, accounting for possible adaptation to environmental changes and revealing conserved extensive array of genomic structure. Population structure analysis suggests a large genetic boundary between Northwest African and Middle Eastern cultivars with 6 subpopulations that represent divergences and fragments of admixture in cultivars present in these regions. The possible… Advisors/Committee Members: Hughes, Harrison (advisor), Krishnan, Sarada (committee member), Brick, Mark (committee member), Davidson, Robert (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: genetic diversity; microsatellites; simple sequence repeats; genetic structure; date palm; phylogenetics

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Zaid, S. E. (2020). Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.). (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/199734

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Zaid, Salah E. “Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.).” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/199734.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Zaid, Salah E. “Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.).” 2020. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Zaid SE. Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.). [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2020. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/199734.

Council of Science Editors:

Zaid SE. Molecular investigations in date palm genetic structure and diversity among commercially important date palm cultivars (Phoenix dactylifera L.). [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/199734


Colorado State University

2. Elghoul, Milad M. Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments.

Degree: PhD, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, 2016, Colorado State University

To view the abstract, please see the full text of the document. Advisors/Committee Members: Hughes, Harrison (advisor), Shahba, Mohamed (committee member), Ocheltree, Troy (committee member), Krishnan, Sarada (committee member).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Elghoul, M. M. (2016). Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170433

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Elghoul, Milad M. “Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170433.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Elghoul, Milad M. “Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments.” 2016. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Elghoul MM. Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170433.

Council of Science Editors:

Elghoul MM. Environmental stress recovery of horned poppy (Glaucium spp.) using growth regulator treatments. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/170433


Colorado State University

3. Graves, Leila. Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A.

Degree: PhD, Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, 2007, Colorado State University

The main purpose of this study was to describe elementary teachers' attitudes and perceptions toward plant science. The secondary purpose was to create an edible plant curriculum as a vehicle for integrating STEM and 21st Century skills into Common Core Content. Results indicate that teachers and STEM coordinators did find the curriculum to be effective in teaching the interdisciplinary standard-based and inquiry based content and skills targeted. Additionally, the curriculum development process produced a hybrid design framework that facilitated the creation of life science content as a vehicle for integrating STEM into common core content. However, several significant barriers will need to be overcome with regard to the teachers', STEM coordinators' and administrators' perception that plant science and nutrition literacy are "special" content activities versus important STEM content. Advisors/Committee Members: Hughes, Harrison (advisor), Balgopal, Meena (advisor), Bunning, Marisa (committee member), Krishnan, Sarada (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: common core content; curriculum development; inquiry based; interdisciplinary; standard-based; STEM

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Graves, L. (2007). Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82598

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Graves, Leila. “Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A.” 2007. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 15, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82598.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Graves, Leila. “Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A.” 2007. Web. 15 Aug 2020.

Vancouver:

Graves L. Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2020 Aug 15]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82598.

Council of Science Editors:

Graves L. Case study evaluation of edible plants curriculum implemented in an elementary school, A. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/82598

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