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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Hempel, Lynn M."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Willis, Jamie L. Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2017, Colorado State University

Over the last 20 years, an extensive literature has examined the "culture wars," or increasing socio-cultural and political polarization within the United States. A major focus of the debate has been whether attitude polarization within the public has increased over that time. While the diversity of perspective and methods within this literature makes understanding their conflict difficult, in general, this debate has centered around differences in the definition and measurement of polarization, consensus, and dissensus. Several researchers have attempted to clarify the divide within the literature, but with insufficient attention to the role of methodological differences. Therefore, the first contribution of this paper is to analyze this literature so as to clearly separate out the distinct and interesting aspects of mass polarization. Beyond that conceptual contribution, the empirical focus of the current work is to illustrate the use of three statistical measures designed specifically to study attitude variation or polarization, which have not previously been used within this literature. These measures, the Index of Qualitative Variation, the RQ Index, and the Index of Ordinal Variation, each offer a unique approach to the measurement of dispersion or polarization in a categorical variable, and thus offer new ways to examine whether the United States has experienced increasing socio-cultural and political polarization within the public. Each of these measures are designed to examine variation in categorical data, which has not been treated as such in the literature. Within this paper, these measures are applied to 120 variables drawn from the American National Election Studies and the General Social Survey over the last 40 to 50 years to examine changes in dispersion or polarization over time. These findings are used to illustrate the strengths and weaknesses of these measures for capturing increasing social and cultural fragmentation within the public, and to compare the findings of these measures to those of the interval level measures used within this literature. Advisors/Committee Members: Lacy, Michael G. (advisor), Hempel, Lynn M. (committee member), Snodgrass, Jeffery G. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Culture War; Political; Social Conflict; Polarization; Consensus; Quantitative Measurement

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APA (6th Edition):

Willis, J. L. (2017). Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/183980

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Willis, Jamie L. “Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization.” 2017. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed July 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/183980.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Willis, Jamie L. “Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization.” 2017. Web. 22 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Willis JL. Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2017. [cited 2019 Jul 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/183980.

Council of Science Editors:

Willis JL. Culture wars? : applying categorical variation measures to the study of sociocultural and political polarization. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/183980


Colorado State University

2. Dollar, Nathan Tilghman. "Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students.

Degree: MA, Sociology, 2007, Colorado State University

This thesis explores the educational experiences of Latino high school students at South Carmen High School. The research presented in this thesis contributes to the large body of literature that attempts to explain why Latino high school students graduate at much lower rates than their white counterparts and other immigrant groups. Specifically, this study examines how Latino students, administrators, and their teachers interact, how these interactions are perceived, and what happens when these interactions fail. Data from this thesis are drawn from an ethnographic case study of the educational community of South Carmen High School. Data was collected using a combination of participant and non-participant observations and 28 in-depth interviews. Interviews were conducted with administrators (n = 5; including one counselor), Latino students (n = 7), parents of those students (n = 8), and teachers (n=8). The data from this study indicate that educators and Latino students and their families at South Carmen High held sharply contrasting interpretations of their interactions with one another. The educators interviewed in this study indicated a key reason that many Latino students are less successful than their white counterparts and other immigrant groups is because Latino students are unable or unwilling to "play school" according to a standard script adopted by educators. However, the Latino students that were interviewed expressed that they knew how to play school and had attempted to perform their role, but were often unsuccessful. The inability or unwillingness to play school was often perceived by educators as a lack of cultural capital on the part of Latino students and their families. This thesis examines how educators' conception of cultural capital differs from that of sociologists' by comparing and contrasting the work of Ruby Payne and Pierre Bourdieu. Drawing on Bourdieu, I argue in this thesis that the concept of cultural capital in the field of Education, which is heavily influenced by the work of Ruby Payne, lacks a sufficient discussion of power, leaving unexplored more foundational issues of how the rules by which we "play school" get defined and who gets to define them. The work of Bourdieu is drawn on because it helps us understand the relationships of power between different agents (e.g. Latino students and educators), but it does not help us explore the interactions between agents whose relationship is characterized by power. The work of Erving Goffman is drawn on to fill this gap and explore the interaction order at South Carmen High. Drawing on Goffman, I argue in this thesis that Latino student-teacher interactions often fail because the obligations and expectations that govern these interactions are not met. Advisors/Committee Members: Hempel, Lynn M. (advisor), Brouillette, John R. (committeechair), Taylor, Peter L. (committee member), Felix, Oscar (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Hispanic American high school students  – Attitudes; High school teachers  – Attitudes

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Dollar, N. T. (2007). "Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/41471

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Dollar, Nathan Tilghman. “"Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed July 22, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/41471.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Dollar, Nathan Tilghman. “"Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students.” 2007. Web. 22 Jul 2019.

Vancouver:

Dollar NT. "Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. [cited 2019 Jul 22]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/41471.

Council of Science Editors:

Dollar NT. "Playing school" : Latinos and role performance as students. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2007. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/41471

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