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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Gavin, William J."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Crasta, Jewel E. Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.

Degree: PhD, Occupational Therapy, 2017, Colorado State University

Attention is a crucial element of our goal-directed, purposeful response to sensory information in our social and physical environments. Individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have significant deficits in sensory processing and attention. However, there is limited research examining the relationship between attention and sensory processing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). The purpose of this dissertation was to examine the relationship between attention and sensory processing in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and neurotypical individuals. Specifically, the objective was to examine if consciously directing attention to incoming information would result in more typical neural processing in individuals with ASD. To answer this question, study 1 was designed to understand how attention and distraction impacted sensory processing in neurotypical individuals. Studies 2 and 3 examined neural measures of sensory processing in individuals with ASD as compared to age-matched neurotypical controls during passive and active attentional states. In Study 1, electroencephalography (EEG) data were recorded while 60 adults (18-35 years) heard random presentations of 4 auditory stimuli at 2 frequencies (1 and 3 kHz) each at 2 intensities (50 and 70 dB). Participants were randomly divided into 2 viewing conditions; one group watched a silent movie and the other viewed a fixation point during the recording. All participants completed 2 attention conditions, the passive condition involved only listening to the stimuli, followed by the active condition, wherein participants were instructed to press a button to the 1 kHz 50 dB tone. Amplitude and latency measures were obtained for the N1, P2, N2, and P3 components for each of the auditory stimuli. The ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of attention condition for the N1, P2, N2, and P3 amplitudes. There were also significant attention-by-viewing condition interaction effects at the P3 component. Results indicated that actively directing attention to the tones impacts auditory processing at all components. Additionally, manipulation of attention by changing the viewing environment significantly interacted with sensory processing, such that movie viewing resulted in larger P3 amplitudes compared with fixation viewing. Thus, viewing environment or distraction impacts sensory processing. In study 2, we examined the effect of attention on auditory filtering using the sensory gating paradigm in individuals with ASD. EEG data were recorded during 2 attention conditions from 24 adults with ASD and 24 neurotypical individuals during the sensory gating paradigm. During the passive condition, participants were presented with single and paired clicks. For the active condition, participants made a motor response following the single click but not the paired click. Attending to the clicks resulted in larger P50 and N1 amplitudes, and reduced gating for all participants. Although, the ASD group had P50 and N1 gating during both attention… Advisors/Committee Members: Davies, Patricia L. (advisor), Gavin, William J. (advisor), Bundy, Anita (committee member), Rojas, Donald (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: autism spectrum disorder; ERPs; sensory processing; auditory processing; occupational therapy; EEG

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APA (6th Edition):

Crasta, J. E. (2017). Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185666

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crasta, Jewel E. “Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185666.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crasta, Jewel E. “Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders.” 2017. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Crasta JE. Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185666.

Council of Science Editors:

Crasta JE. Examining the relationship between sensory processing and attention in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2017. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185666


Colorado State University

2. Crasta, Jewel Elias. Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Occupational Therapy, 2015, Colorado State University

Auditory processing is one of the most commonly reported sensory processing impairments in autism spectrum disorders. This study sought to determine whether children with high-functioning autism spectrum disorders (HFA) differ from typically developing children on neurophysiological measures of auditory information processing. We hypothesized that children with HFA would have significant different brain activity when listening to auditory stimuli compared to typically developing children. A cross-sectional quasi-experimental quantitative study design with convenience sampling procedures was employed to compare two groups. Nineteen children with HFA and 19 age- and gender-matched typically developing children, ages 5 to 12 years, participated in this study. Electroencephalography (EEG) recordings were made while participants watched a silent movie and heard random presentations of four auditory stimuli at two different frequencies (1 and 3 kHz) and at two different intensities (50 and 70 dB). The stimuli were presented in 4 blocks of 100 trials each, with 25 trials of each of the stimuli in random order with a 2-second inter-stimulus interval. Amplitude and latency measures were obtained for the P1, N1, P2, N2, and P3 components from the averaged event-related potentials (ERPs) for each of the four auditory stimuli. An analysis of variance for the ERP components, revealed that children with HFA had significantly smaller N2 amplitudes for the low frequency low intensity tone, and significantly smaller P3 amplitudes to the high intensity at both frequencies stimuli compared to typically developing children. This finding suggests that children with HFA have increased difficulty in automatic stimuli discrimination and reduced cognitive processing to these auditory stimuli. Children with HFA also had significantly longer P2 latencies for the high intensity high frequency tone compared to typically developing peers, suggesting delayed auditory processing. In conclusion, this study shows that children with HFA display different brain processing mechanisms to auditory sensory stimuli compared to typically developing children. These differences suggest that the auditory processing deficits observed in children with HFA may arise from atypical neurophysiological functioning related to stimuli discrimination and processing. These results can help practitioners understand the neurophysiological basis of behavioral manifestations of ASD, especially those atypical behaviors that occur in response to sensory experiences in everyday activities. Understanding the specific aspects of sensory processing that are a challenge for children with HFA may provide guidance to the types of treatment strategies that will be most effective. Advisors/Committee Members: Davies, Patricia L. (advisor), Gavin, William J. (committee member), LaGasse, Blythe (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: autism spectrum disorder; sensory processing; auditory processing; EEG

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Crasta, J. E. (2015). Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167020

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Crasta, Jewel Elias. “Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167020.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Crasta, Jewel Elias. “Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism.” 2015. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Crasta JE. Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2015. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167020.

Council of Science Editors:

Crasta JE. Sensory registration in children with high functioning autism. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2015. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/167020

3. Pott, Christine Elizabeth. Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Occupational Therapy, 2016, Colorado State University

Sensory processing has long been a topic of interest in the field of occupational therapy. This study sought to replicate the results of Davies and Gavin (2007) which examined differences in auditory sensory processing between children with sensory processing disorder (SPD) and typically developing (TD) children as well as expand the results to a sample of children with high functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Additionally, this study sought to relate the neurophysiological measures of sensory processing to a behavioral assessment measuring sensory processing. We hypothesized that the results of Davies and Gavin (2007) would be replicated and expanded to include children with ASD and measures from the Sensory Profile (SP) would relate to the participants' neurological measures of sensory processing. 62 TD children, and 21 children each with SPD and ASD were recruited as part of a convenience sample. Participants’ brainwaves were recorded through electroencephalography (EEG) while they watched a silent movie and listened to a sensory gating paradigm consisting of two paired clicks and a sensory registration paradigm consisting of 4 tones of varied intensity and frequency. From the sensory gating paradigm P50 amplitudes were obtained. From the sensory registration paradigm amplitudes and latencies for N100, P200, N200, and P300 were obtained. Analyses revealed that while the results of Davies and Gavin (2007) were partially replicated, in that sensory gating was able to be significantly predicted from sensory registration the same pattern of sensory hyper and hypo-responsivity was not observed. Results indicate that the Sensory Profile does in part relate to the neurophysiological measures of sensory processing. This study confirmed that auditory sensory processing does differ between children with SPD, children ASD, and TD children. It contributes to occupational therapy's understanding of sensory processing in children and also towards increased understanding of how the SP relates to underlying neurological mechanisms. Advisors/Committee Members: Davies, Patricia L. (advisor), Gavin, William J. (committee member), LaGasse, Blythe (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: sensory processing; electroencephalography

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Pott, C. E. (2016). Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/178939

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Pott, Christine Elizabeth. “Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed January 23, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/178939.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Pott, Christine Elizabeth. “Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder.” 2016. Web. 23 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Pott CE. Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 23]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/178939.

Council of Science Editors:

Pott CE. Auditory sensory processing in children with sensory processing disorder and Autism Spectrum Disorder. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/178939

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