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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Ganster, Daniel"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Weston, James W. Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Psychology, 2016, Colorado State University

Research has been contradictory in the definition and measurement of employee engagement. Despite being predominantly measured as a trait-like stable construct, engagement was originally introduced as a moment-to-moment fluctuating concept. The focus of the current research is on the conceptualization of the stability of the employee engagement construct. Specifically, I examined fluctuations in engagement as they related to varying levels of three theoretical antecedents (psychological safety, psychological availability, and psychological meaningfulness). Using experience sampling, forty nine participants were asked to complete surveys on cellular devices or workplace computers, for five weeks, twice per day at random moments, for a total of 30 data-points per participant. These daily surveys assessed fluctuations in engagement levels in relation to the other contextual variables, while their accumulation over the five-week period provided insight into the relative stability of the construct. Results showed momentary job engagement was positively related to momentary stress, affect, and the quality of coworker interactions. Additionally, between-person differences in engagement were positively related to job satisfaction, general positive affect, and general job engagement. The current study provides a glimpse into within-person fluctuations in engagement. Findings suggest that although engagement may vary within-employees, between-person differences are still present and represent valuable information. Advisors/Committee Members: Byrne, Zinta (advisor), Fisher, Gwenith (committee member), Ganster, Daniel (committee member), Harman, Jennifer (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: experience sampling methodology; employee engagement; occupational stress

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APA (6th Edition):

Weston, J. W. (2016). Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176714

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Weston, James W. “Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176714.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Weston, James W. “Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability.” 2016. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Weston JW. Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176714.

Council of Science Editors:

Weston JW. Employee engagement: understanding the construct's stability. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176714


Colorado State University

2. Kiersch, Christa E. Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A.

Degree: PhD, Psychology, 2012, Colorado State University

Answering long-standing calls for research on how leaders influence followers and organization performance, as well as for the integration of leadership and justice research, this study proposes and tests a multi-level model of leadership, justice, and uncertainty. Building upon uncertainty management theory and the nascent research in authentic leadership, I propose a multi-level moderated mediation model wherein authentic leaders influence individual fairness perceptions and create a fair climate, which in turn is related to the well-being, turnover intention, commitment, and performance of subordinates. Uncertainty serves as a moderator in the model, such that leadership and fair climate are proposed to have a stronger relationship with employee outcomes when the level of perceived job and organizational uncertainty is high than when uncertainty is low. Survey data from 211 employees, clustered under 37 leaders (direct supervisors) is tested using a modification of Preacher et al.'s (2007, 2010) multi-level structural equation modeling (MSEM) approach. Results indicate that authentic leaders impact follower and organizational outcomes in part via directly influencing follower justice perceptions and justice climate, and that the effects of authentic leadership and justice are relatively independent of uncertainty level. This study contributes to the scientific literature by integrating theories of leadership, fairness, and uncertainty management, and by illustrating a novel and sophisticated approach (MSEM) to test this integrated model at the individual and leader levels of the organization. Implications for practice include support for authentic leadership development as an actionable strategy to bolster fairness perceptions and build a fair climate, as well as positively impact well-being, attitudinal, and behavioral intent outcomes of followers. Advisors/Committee Members: Byrne, Zinta (advisor), Ganster, Daniel (committee member), Gibbons, Alyssa (committee member), Henry, Kimberly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: organizational justice; leadership; uncertainty climate; fairness; job insecurity

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kiersch, C. E. (2012). Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67938

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kiersch, Christa E. “Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A.” 2012. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67938.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kiersch, Christa E. “Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A.” 2012. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Kiersch CE. Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2012. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67938.

Council of Science Editors:

Kiersch CE. Multi-level examination of authentic leadership and organizational justice in uncertain times, A. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2012. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/67938


Colorado State University

3. Brossoit, Rebecca M. Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Psychology, 2018, Colorado State University

Recent nationwide polls suggest that work and home are two dominant sources of stress for Americans. There is a vast literature on the relationships between work and home life (e.g., Eby, Casper, Lockwood, Bordeaux, & Brinley, 2005), and theoretical frameworks such as the work-home resources model (Ten Brummelhuis & Bakker, 2012) seek to elucidate the processes between work and home by specifying linking mechanisms. The present study tested the work-home resources model by specifying sleep as a novel personal resource that links work and home life. Specifically, 6-month self-reported and actigraphic sleep quantity and quality were assessed as mediators of the relationships between baseline psychological work demands and work resources (i.e., decision authority and schedule control) and 12-month attitudes and behaviors at home (i.e., relationship satisfaction and spouse-reported relationship strain) in a sample of nurses and certified nursing assistants. The results demonstrate that work demands predicted self-reported sleep quality, but not sleep quantity. Further, work resources predicted self-reported sleep quantity and quality, but sleep quantity and quality did not relate to outcomes at home. Work-related attitudes and behaviors (i.e., job satisfaction, safety compliance, and organizational citizenship behaviors) were also explored; there was some evidence that self-reported sleep quantity and quality predicted job satisfaction and organizational citizenship behaviors, but not safety compliance. Further, self-reported sleep quantity and quality at 6-months explained the relationships between baseline work resources and 12-month job satisfaction. Advisors/Committee Members: Crain, Tori L. (advisor), Fisher, Gwenith G. (committee member), Ganster, Daniel C. (committee member), Rickard, Kathryn M. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: relationship satisfaction; schedule control; work demands; relationship strain; decision authority; sleep

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brossoit, R. M. (2018). Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189272

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brossoit, Rebecca M. “Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed December 01, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189272.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brossoit, Rebecca M. “Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep.” 2018. Web. 01 Dec 2020.

Vancouver:

Brossoit RM. Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Dec 01]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189272.

Council of Science Editors:

Brossoit RM. Linking work and home life: mediating effects of sleep. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/189272

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