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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Eckery, Douglas C."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Eddy, Kathleen M. Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Biomedical Sciences, 2020, Colorado State University

Overabundant feral horse populations within the United States cause significant and detrimental economic and ecological impacts. Aside from helicopter roundups and long-term holding facilities, current management practices of feral horses include application of contraception in conjunction with non-invasive determination of pregnancy through the measurement of fecal steroid metabolite monitoring. Prior to this study, the earliest timing of definitive pregnancy diagnosis was between 120 – 180 days of gestation, when measuring total unconjugated fecal estrogens (Bamberg et al 1984; Kirkpatrick et al 1989), or from samples taken at least 150 days of gestation when measuring fecal estrone sulfate (Henderson et al 1998 and 1999). The studies in this thesis examined measurement of estradiol 17β, an estrogen that has yet to be quantified in the feces of domestic and feral mares. The overall objectives of the studies in this thesis were to determine the efficacy of fecal and serum estradiol measurement in the estimation of pregnancy in the mare, as well as the definitive timing within gestation when fecal and serum concentrations diverged from those of non-pregnant mares. The first study of this thesis utilized 8 pregnant domestic mares with known embryo transfer dates, as well as 8 non-pregnant cycling mares. Weekly fecal and blood samples were collected from the pregnant mares for the entirety of gestation, while daily fecal and blood samples were taken from the cycling mares for 23 days. Radioimmunoassay (RIA) specific for estradiol 17β was used to quantify extracted fecal and serum samples for the two groups. It was found that at a mean of 105 days of gestation, fecal estradiol concentrations in pregnant mares surpassed non-pregnant mare concentrations, with a calculated cut-off value of 10 pg/mg feces. Serum estradiol concentrations of pregnant mares surpassed those of non-pregnant mares at an average of 128 days of gestation, with a concentration of at least 46 pg/mL serum. Additionally, aside from increasing earlier in gestation, compared to serum, fecal estradiol was found to fluctuate less throughout pregnancy. The second study of this thesis examined 77 fecal and serum samples collected from 51 feral mares during two roundups in Theodore Roosevelt National Park (THRO), as well as 272 individual fecal samples collected over a 6 year period from the same 51 mares. Using the cut-off days and concentrations affiliated with the first study, correlative comparisons were made for the feral mare samples, and pregnancy status was elucidated. Of the 62 fecal samples taken during the roundups past the cut-off day of 105 days, 60 of them surpassed the fecal cut-off concentration of 10 pg/mg feces. Thirty-four of 49 serum samples taken past the cut-off day of 128 surpassed the cut-off concentration of 46 pg/mL. While only two of the 62 fecal samples taken past the cut-off of 105 days were below the cut-off concentration, 14 of the 49 serum samples taken past cut-off day 128 were below the serum cut-off concentration of 46 pg/mL… Advisors/Committee Members: Nett, Terry M. (advisor), Eckery, Douglas C. (advisor), Baker, Dan L. (committee member), Bruemmer, Jason E. (committee member), Hollinshead, Fiona K. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: feces; serum; mare; estradiol

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APA (6th Edition):

Eddy, K. M. (2020). Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/219569

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Eddy, Kathleen M. “Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare.” 2020. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/219569.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Eddy, Kathleen M. “Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare.” 2020. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Eddy KM. Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/219569.

Council of Science Editors:

Eddy KM. Use of fecal and serum estradiol analysis for estimation of pregnancy status in the mare. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/219569


Colorado State University

2. Orahood, Darcy Sonya. Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Clinical Sciences, 2013, Colorado State University

Aquaculture is a rapidly growing industry that significantly contributes to the world food supply. Sustainable practices in aquaculture are of increasing importance as an increasing proportion of fish in the global market come from aquaculture instead of wild catch. Maximizing aquaculture yields and minimizing the ecological impacts of these operations are two important goals towards sustainability. One approach to addressing these objectives is immunocontraception of fish which would increase the fish meat quality and yield in aquaculture production and prevent escaped farmed fish from undesirably altering wild fish population genetics through breeding. The research presented here was conducted with the aim of proof of concept for contraceptive vaccine use in Atlantic salmon. Nine vaccine formulations, including a negative control vaccine, were formulated at the National Wildlife Research Center in Fort Collins, Colorado and injected into farmed Atlantic salmon in Sunndalsøra, Norway. Production of antibodies against three immunogenic components in each vaccine formulation was evaluated over the course of the 12-week study. Weight and length of each fish were also tracked over time to determine whether growth was affected by vaccination. The study results indicate that Atlantic salmon will produce antibodies against BSA and KLH used as carrier proteins but that KLH is a stronger immunogen. Importantly, it was also determined that Atlantic salmon will produce antibodies against a small endogenous peptide (hapten) conjugated to the carrier protein, but to a lesser extent than the levels of antibody production against the carrier itself. Approximately 96% of samples from fish vaccinated against KLH, 76% of samples from fish vaccinated against BSA, and 36% of samples from fish vaccinated against the hapten were identified as positive. Response rates for all three antigens were highest 12 weeks post-vaccination. Significant differences in antibody levels were also detected between groups vaccinated with different immunostimulants. Collectively, the results provide proof of concept and provide a building block for further research on immunocontraception of Atlantic salmon for application in aquaculture. Advisors/Committee Members: Salman, M. D. (advisor), Eckery, Douglas C. (committee member), Miller, Lowell A. (committee member), Myrick, Christopher A. (committee member), Rhyan, Jack C. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: vaccine; reproduction; immunocontraception; Atlantic salmon

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Orahood, D. S. (2013). Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/81048

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Orahood, Darcy Sonya. “Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon.” 2013. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed April 14, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/81048.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Orahood, Darcy Sonya. “Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon.” 2013. Web. 14 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Orahood DS. Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2013. [cited 2021 Apr 14]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/81048.

Council of Science Editors:

Orahood DS. Evaluation of an adjuvanted hapten-protein vaccine approach to preventing sexual maturation of farmed Atlantic salmon. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2013. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/81048

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