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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Broeckling, Corey D."). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Lavergne, Florent Didier. Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Horticulture & Landscape Architecture, 2019, Colorado State University

Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is a global staple crop and controlling for environmental stress that impacts grain yield is critical. Recently, Wheat Stem Sawfly (Cephus cinctus, hereafter WSS) has emerged as a new pest of wheat and is expanding across the Great Plains and southern United States. WSS is difficult to control using chemical, cultural or biological pest management methods. Currently, wheat breeders utilize a solid-stem trait to inhibit larval feeding and reduce lodging, however this trait only confers partial resistance and is thought to reduce grain yield. Models of metabolic-based resistance with demonstrated impact on reduction of insect pest fitness have been documented. Here, I investigate the broader hypothesis that wheat resistance to WSS is mediated by shifts in metabolism that promote avoidance and toxicity towards WSS. Four cultivars with contrasting phenotypes are used in our studies: Hatcher (resistant to WSS, hollow-stem, winter wheat); Conan (resistant, semi-solid-stem, spring); Denali (susceptible, hollow-stem, winter); and Reeder (susceptible, hollow-stem, spring). The first part of this work involved gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) metabolomics methods to provide a comprehensive characterization of the chemical composition of wheat cuticular waxes. A total of 263 putative compounds were detected among the four abovementioned wheat cultivars and comprised 58 wax compounds including alkanes and fatty acids. Many of the detected wax metabolites have known associations to important biological functions such as insect pest and drought resistance. Uni- and multivariate statistics were used to evaluate metabolite distribution between tissue types (leaf, stem) and cultivars. Leaves contained more primary alcohols than stems such as 6-methylheptacosan-1-ol and octacosan-1-ol. The metabolite data were complemented using scanning electron microscopy of epicuticular wax crystals which detected wax tubules and platelets. Conan (resistant to WSS) was the only cultivar to display alcohol-associated platelet-shaped crystals on its abaxial leaf surface. The second part of this study aimed at evaluating a selection of wheat cultivars in a WSS-infested field. Cultivars with increased yield and reduced WSS infestation values were found. The molecular basis of this resistance was evaluated in a greenhouse study that characterized proteomic and metabolomic signatures of wheat stems associated with WSS infestation. Stem proteins (1832) and metabolites (1823) were detected in the same four wheat cultivars using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. During infestation with WSS, 62 proteins and 29 metabolites were differentially regulated in the hollow-stem resistant cultivar Hatcher. Metabolic processes that were associated with resistance included enzymatic detoxification, proteinase inhibition, and anti-herbivory compound production, specifically the benzoxazinoids, neolignans, and phenolics. Compared to the semi-solid and resistant cultivar Conan, hollow-stem Hatcher had increased… Advisors/Committee Members: Heuberger, Adam L. (advisor), Broeckling, Corey D. (committee member), Pearce, Stephen (committee member), Jahn, Courtney E. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Herbivory; Pest resistance; Wheat stem sawfly; Mass spectrometry; Cuticular wax; Triticum aestivum

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APA (6th Edition):

Lavergne, F. D. (2019). Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/193100

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lavergne, Florent Didier. “Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed August 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/193100.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lavergne, Florent Didier. “Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry.” 2019. Web. 17 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Lavergne FD. Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Aug 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/193100.

Council of Science Editors:

Lavergne FD. Understanding the molecular basis of insect pest resistance in Triticum aestivum using mass spectrometry. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/193100


Colorado State University

2. Hamm, Alison Kay. Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The.

Degree: PhD, Food Science and Human Nutrition, 2018, Colorado State University

Estrogen decline with aging, or menopause, is associated with increased risk for cardiometabolic diseases primarily due to altered metabolism and weight gain. Standard treatment has traditionally been with 17β-estradiol (E2) prescription, although its use has declined over the last decade due to associated increase in breast and ovarian cancer risk. As a result, use of phytoestrogenic herbal supplements has increased, due to their perceived safety and effectiveness in treatment of menopausal side effects. The gut microbiota may also be important in terms of mitigating disease risk and hormone exposure during the menopause transition, as our gut microbiota are important modulators of local and systemic inflammation. Gut microbes also can metabolize hormones and dietary flavonoids, altering their bioactivity and bioavailability. In this study, we supplemented ovariectomized (OVX) or control sham-operated C57BL/6 mice, with oral E2, a flavonoid-rich extract from hops (Humulus lupulus), or placebo carrier oil, and observed differences in adiposity, inflammation, and gut bacteria composition. Hops extract (HE) did not protect against ovariectomy-associated weight gain or increased visceral adiposity, while E2-treated animals had similar body weights and fat depot sizes as Sham-operated animals. However, HE was protective against liver triglyceride accumulation, to levels similar to Sham control and OVX E2 groups. We found no evidence of OVX having a significant impact on the overall gut bacterial community structure in any of our treatment groups. We did find differences in abundance of two bacteria; Akkermansia muciniphila was lower with HE treatment in the Sham group, and Ruminococcus gnavus was higher with OVX compared to Sham control. Possible mechanisms of the interplay between gut bacteria, loss of estrogen, and hormone replacement will be discussed. Advisors/Committee Members: Weir, Tiffany L. (advisor), Cox-York, Kimberly A. (committee member), Broeckling, Corey D. (committee member), Avens, John S. (committee member), Bunning, Marisa L. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Hop Extract; Menopause; Gut Health; Microbiome; Hormone Therapy

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hamm, A. K. (2018). Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185624

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hamm, Alison Kay. “Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed August 17, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185624.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hamm, Alison Kay. “Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The.” 2018. Web. 17 Aug 2019.

Vancouver:

Hamm AK. Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2019 Aug 17]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185624.

Council of Science Editors:

Hamm AK. Effect of hop extract supplementation on gut microbiota and metabolic function in ovariectomized mice, The. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/185624

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