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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Bielak, Allison"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Lin, Mei-Heng. Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The.

Degree: PhD, Occupational Therapy, 2018, Colorado State University

The overarching goal of this dissertation is to explore the relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in neurotypical children, neurotypical adults, and adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Electroencephalography (EEG)/event-related potential (ERP) techniques were used to measure the neural processes while participants performed a speeded computer-based task for the three studies conducted in this dissertation. The first study examined the test-retest reliability on the amplitudes of two ERP components associated with performance monitoring, the error-related negativity (ERN) and error-positivity (Pe), in 53 neurotypical adults and 118 neurotypical children aged 8-12-year-old. The findings indicated that the test-retest reliability of these measures was moderate for children (rERN = 0.55, rPe = 0.62), and was moderate to strong for adults (rERN = 0.69, rPe = 0.75). Moreover, the adaptive Woody filter was implemented to adjust for the trial-to-trial variation in latency (i.e., latency jitter) when measuring the ERN and Pe amplitudes. The findings showed that adjusting for the latency jitter did not improve the reliability of ERN and Pe amplitudes for both groups, suggesting that the latency variability may be a trait-like variable which systematically occurred across sessions. Furthermore, the test-retest reliability of stimulus-locked ERP components on correct trials was higher compared to the reliability of response-locked ERPs for children and adults, confirming that both children and adults generally attended to the task consistently across sessions. The second study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing the structural equation modeling (SEM) approach to model the complicated inter-relationship between neural processes and simple task behaviors (e.g., response times) in 143 children with typical development aged 8-12 years. The findings from the latent models indicated that the brain-and-behavior relationships were significant on correct trials but were not significant on incorrect trials after controlling for trait and state factors. Moreover, both models demonstrated different patterns of relationship among latent variables to response time, yet both models yielded excellent model fit indices. This finding suggested that our conceptual models were valid in terms of detecting the distinct patterns of neural processes leading to opposite behavioral outcomes (e.g., correct and incorrect). The final model demonstrated that the post-error adjustment in the stream of neural processes provided an adaptive effect on the early neural processing of the stimulus on correct trials. To our knowledge, this is the first study demonstrating how the post-error adjustment occurs at the level of neural processing. The third study (1) compared the group differences (children, adults, and adults with ADHD) on neural and occupational performance measures, (2) examined the inter-relationship between these measures for each group, and (3) investigated which measures can best… Advisors/Committee Members: Davies, Patricia (advisor), Bielak, Allison (committee member), Gavin, William (committee member), Malcolm, Matthew (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: error positivity; occupational performance; structure equation modeling; error-related negativity; attention deficit hyperactivity disorder; performance monitoring

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APA (6th Edition):

Lin, M. (2018). Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191472

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Lin, Mei-Heng. “Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The.” 2018. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191472.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Lin, Mei-Heng. “Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The.” 2018. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Lin M. Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191472.

Council of Science Editors:

Lin M. Relationship between cognitive functions and occupational performance in children, adults, and adults with attention deficit hyperactivity disorders (ADHD), The. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/191472

2. Brothers, Allyson F. Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging.

Degree: PhD, Human Development and Family Studies, 2016, Colorado State University

Recent renewed interest has arisen regarding the ways in which individuals experience the process of growing older, an area of research known as subjective aging. A growing body of research shows a consistent pattern of results in which subjective aging exerts wide-reaching and consequential influence on both physical functioning as well as psychological well-being in later life. Historically, research has relied on simplistic, unidimensional measures, that while quite predictive of developmental outcomes, are somewhat of a 'black box' in that it is not understood exactly what information people rely on to make them. Therefore, the construct awareness of age-related change (AARC) was developed to yield insight into the specific behavioral domains in which aging experiences are noticed. Given the need for such a construct in the literature, the manuscript in Chapter 2 focuses on the development of a reliable and valid assessment tool to measure awareness of age-related change (AARC). Not only is such a construct more representative of leading theories in adult development and aging, it is also vital for understanding how people experience aging in different life domains. Therefore, the manuscript in Chapter 3 will explore how AARC is similar to and distinct from existing subjective aging constructs, and also how it is related to important physical and psychological outcome variables. Chapter 4 then extends the current state of research regarding subjective aging, which has largely been observational in nature, and attends to the issues of intervention design: Given the mounting evidence of the importance of attitudinal variables of aging, Chapter 4 explores the following questions: 1) Can more realistic and positive attitudes toward aging be promoted through intervention? and 2) Does modifying attitudes have tangible effects on health behavior promotion? Advisors/Committee Members: Diehl, Manfred (advisor), Bielak, Allison (committee member), Fidler, Deborah (committee member), Henry, Kimberly (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: awareness of age-related change; measurement development; attitudes toward aging; successful aging; intervention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Brothers, A. F. (2016). Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176696

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brothers, Allyson F. “Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed November 27, 2020. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176696.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brothers, Allyson F. “Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging.” 2016. Web. 27 Nov 2020.

Vancouver:

Brothers AF. Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. [cited 2020 Nov 27]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176696.

Council of Science Editors:

Brothers AF. Awareness of age-related change (AARC): measurement, conceptual status, and role for promoting successful aging. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2016. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/176696

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