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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado State University" +contributor:("Barone, Ryan"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Colorado State University

1. Coviello, Jenna. Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram.

Degree: MA, Communication Studies, 2019, Colorado State University

This study focuses on how college students engage with the various Instagram accounts run by Barstool Sports (e.g., @chicks, @barstoolsports, @5thyear, and college-affiliated Barstool Instagrams) and how engagement influences their perceptions of risk and risky behavior decision-making. Through this study, I review the literature surrounding Social Cognitive Theory (SCT) and risk communication. I also give an overview of Barstool Sports and how they present college students in the previously mentioned Instagram accounts. I looked to answer two research questions: RQ1: How does Barstool's affiliated Instagram accounts showcasing college-student-produced videos model destructive and risky behaviors? RQ2: How do Barstool Sports' Instagram accounts influence college-aged consumers' perceptions of risk and decision making in the college experience? I conducted fifteen interviews with recent college graduates of universities who have previously consumed and/or currently consume media with Barstool Sports' affiliation. My goal was to understand how participants' consumption of this media specifically affects their cognitive development, risk perceptions, and, ultimately, the culture of their college institution. I coded the interviews through thematic analysis and discovered three, key themes in RQ1: Glorifying college stereotypes as the "norm," imitation and "one upping" to be featured, and college life as opportunity for Barstool content causes a need to be vigilant of one's actions. Five, key themes were uncovered in RQ2: Being featured on Barstool and consuming Barstool for "coolness," popularity, and social clout; dissonance from personal morals; cringy and risky images provide entertainment, but to a certain extent; recognition of the unexpected (and sometimes expected) negatives of Barstool features and a student's selective disengagement and its association to a college's mission and conduct expectation. Because college is a time when students run the risk of developing negative habits that can damage their academic standing, negatively impact their health, and result in struggles with university student conduct codes, this research can provide clarity on why students choose to partake in the behaviors and actions like those portrayed on these Instagram accounts. Advisors/Committee Members: Faw, Meara (advisor), Marx, Nicholas (committee member), Barone, Ryan (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: Instagram; social cognitive theory; undergraduate students; risk communication; decision-making; social media consumption

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Coviello, J. (2019). Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram. (Masters Thesis). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/197449

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Coviello, Jenna. “Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram.” 2019. Masters Thesis, Colorado State University. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/197449.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Coviello, Jenna. “Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram.” 2019. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Coviello J. Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/197449.

Council of Science Editors:

Coviello J. Barstool consequences : college students' risk perceptions when interacting with Barstool Sports' modeling of the college experience through Instagram. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/197449


Colorado State University

2. Hirsch, Dan. Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes.

Degree: PhD, Education, 2019, Colorado State University

Sexual violence on college campuses is a serious and pervasive issue facing higher education in the United States. Social norms interventions provide a promising framework for reducing sexual violence on college campuses. Some research has been conducted using social norms interventions with student athletes, but the findings are inconsistent between Division I and III levels. The purpose of this study was to a) examine the role and impact of social norms and rape myth acceptance (RMA) among male student athletes at Division III programs and b) better understand the influence of normative clarification on male student athlete behavior in small school settings. A survey was distributed to over 200 male, student athletes at a small, private, liberal arts institution and was comprised of three instruments: 1) the Student Athlete Social Norms Survey, 2) the Hypermasculinity Inventory and 3) the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance Scale. Participants were placed into three different test conditions (no norms / control, high norms and low norms) to measure the influence of normative statements on their rape myth acceptance. No statistically significant differences were found between levels of rape myth acceptance across the intervention groups. The findings support earlier studies that found differences in the impact of normative campaigns between Division I and Division III student-athletes. Advisors/Committee Members: McKelfresh, David (advisor), Barone, Ryan (advisor), Kilmer, Jason (committee member), Folkstead, James (committee member), Siller, Tom (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: rape myth; Division III; student athlete

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hirsch, D. (2019). Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado State University. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/10217/195367

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hirsch, Dan. “Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes.” 2019. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado State University. Accessed October 21, 2019. http://hdl.handle.net/10217/195367.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hirsch, Dan. “Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes.” 2019. Web. 21 Oct 2019.

Vancouver:

Hirsch D. Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2019. [cited 2019 Oct 21]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/195367.

Council of Science Editors:

Hirsch D. Evaluating the impact of introducing social norms statements on rape myth acceptance among Division III male athletes. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado State University; 2019. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/10217/195367

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