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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado School of Mines" +contributor:("Kroepsch, Adrianne"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado School of Mines

1. Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.

Degree: PhD, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2020, Colorado School of Mines

Urbanization is expected to persist in cities across the world, resulting in increased percent imperviousness, alterations to the hydrologic regime, degraded water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems. Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) have been developed to mitigate some of the impacts of urban development, but come in a wide range of designs and have variable hydrologic performance based on their primary function. SCMs exist on a continuum that ranges from green (typically above ground infrastructure that includes vegetation) to grey (large storage facilities or underground distributed infrastructure). The decision-making process for an optimal stormwater management plan on a watershed-scale is complex and multi-faceted. Conflicting stakeholder interests need to be considered when determining the optimal suite of SCMs for a particular watershed. Hydrologic models, such as the EPA’s System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration (SUSTAIN) can be used to simulate water quantity and quality as well as evaluate the implementation of SCMs on a watershed-scale. Decision support tools can assist stakeholders and decision makers in optimizing between varying SCM types based on the needs and priorities of their specific watershed and communities. The research in this dissertation uses a hydrologic model and decision support tool and aims to improve stormwater modeling by 1) exploring the feasibility of meeting regulatory compliance with the implementation of SCMs, 2) investigating the performance and tradeoff of greener to greyer SCMs using optimizations, and 3) improving the decision-making process by incorporating life cycle costs and a benefit analysis with stormwater modeling. A multi-watershed analysis conducted in Los Angeles County found that meeting water quality regulations when implementing SCMs on a watershed-scale is dependent on percent imperviousness and land use characteristics which impact baseline water quantity and quality. Despite routing runoff from 90% of the watershed to greener SCMs only three of the six simulated SCM solutions reached compliance in the Ballona Creek watershed and none were successful in the Dominguez Channel and Los Angeles River watersheds, highlighting the need for a more robust planning-level approach to determine the optimal stormwater management plan. The investigation of greener vs greyer SCMs in the Berkeley Lake neighborhood, (Denver, CO) found that all SCM types offer varying hydrologic benefits based on their design and function. For example, underground infiltration (greyer) and infiltration trenches (greener) are optimal for reducing average annual flow volume while underground detention (greyer) and vegetated swales (greener) are better at reducing pollutant average annual concentrations. Optimizing (maximizing a benefit and minimizing cost) between thousands of SCM solutions and rating benefits based on stakeholder preferences identified that while the primary goal of a watershed may initially put more weight on particular SCM types, the consideration… Advisors/Committee Members: Hogue, Terri S. (advisor), Kroepsch, Adrianne (committee member), Smith, Steven M. (committee member), Smith, Jessica, 1980- (committee member), Bell, Colin D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: hydrologic modeling; stormwater control measures; green infrastructure; urbanization; stormwater

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gallo, E. M. (2020). Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. “Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. “Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.” 2020. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Gallo EM. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335.

Council of Science Editors:

Gallo EM. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335


Colorado School of Mines

2. Hansford, Mark R. Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The.

Degree: PhD, Geology and Geological Engineering, 2020, Colorado School of Mines

Rivers have long been characterized by their average discharge and assumed to be sediment bypass conduits carrying sediment to its final depositional sinks. This dissertation combines daily discharge data from river gauging stations with satellite imagery to betterunderstand both river discharge and fluvial fans. We examine at fluvial discharge in the context of different hydroclimates. The importance of the role of discharge variability is increasingly being recognized and this work shines a quantitative light on the climatic controls of river discharge and identifies linkages between discharge and fluvial fan formation scaling relationships.Through these investigations, we 1) develop a new set of dimensionless metrics to quantify discharge variability, 2) identify how river discharge variability falls into four statistically different and predictable groups that are characterized by flood magnitude, hydrograph shape, and inter-annual variability in discharge and are controlled by climate, 3) demonstrate that 75% of modern fluvial fans have fan-forming rivers with high discharge variability, and 4) characterize important geomorphometric scaling relationships in fluvial fans between discharge, channel width, and fan size.These findings have implications for both terrestrial and extraterrestrial landscape evolution, paleoclimate modeling, and flood prediction and mitigation. Furthermore, the quantitative identification of scaling relationships intrinsic to fluvial fans should provide useful for hydrocarbon exploration and production. Advisors/Committee Members: Plink-Björklund, Piret (advisor), Jobe, Zane R. (committee member), Singha, Kamini (committee member), Kroepsch, Adrianne (committee member).

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hansford, M. R. (2020). Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174155

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hansford, Mark R. “Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174155.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hansford, Mark R. “Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The.” 2020. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Hansford MR. Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174155.

Council of Science Editors:

Hansford MR. Effects of climate on fluvial discharge and key controls of fluvial fans: a quantitative study, The. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174155


Colorado School of Mines

3. Forrester, Mary Michael. Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales.

Degree: PhD, Geology and Geological Engineering, 2020, Colorado School of Mines

The processes that govern the quality, quantity, and movement of water resources are a multifaceted and nonlinear system of interactions between the earth, the land surface, vegetation, and the lower atmosphere. Recent advancements in computational efficiency and earth system modeling have awarded hydrologists with increasingly high resolution models of terrestrial hydrology, which are paramount to understanding and predicting these complex fluxes of moisture and energy. Extreme-scale (continental scale and above) hydrologic simulations are, in particular, of interest to the hydrologic community for numerous societal and operational applications. However, computational demand has traditionally necessitated some type of relaxed physical assumptions, usually by focusing physical realism on isolated components of the water cycle; for instance, land surface models as the lower boundary to meteorological models often simplify surface and subsurface hydrology, concentrating on the balance of radiation and surface turbulent fluxes but neglecting deep and lateral redistribution of soil moisture. Given the growing body of literature detailing the benefits of capturing coupled system exchange of moisture and energy, there is increasing demand for large-scale, high resolution models which simulate the hydrologic cycle as an integrated whole, from bedrock to land surface to atmosphere. This dissertation presents work towards fully-coupled, high-resolution hydrologic simulations at extreme scales. In these chapters, the importance of representing dynamic groundwater and lateral subsurface moisture redistribution is shown with regard to regional atmospheric modeling. Also discussed is the fidelity, uncertainty, and application of high-resolution, coupled-system hydrologic simulations at the continental scale. This work focuses on the connection between groundwater and atmosphere, demonstrates the importance of hydrologic representation in meteorological and remote sensing applications, and implicates the use of continental-scale hydrologic models to better understand the processes that govern our invaluable water resources. Advisors/Committee Members: Maxwell, Reed M. (advisor), Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K. (committee member), Pankavich, Stephen (committee member), Kroepsch, Adrianne (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: computational; land surface; atmosphere; modeling; groundwater

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Forrester, M. M. (2020). Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174215

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Forrester, Mary Michael. “Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed April 12, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174215.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Forrester, Mary Michael. “Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales.” 2020. Web. 12 Apr 2021.

Vancouver:

Forrester MM. Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. [cited 2021 Apr 12]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174215.

Council of Science Editors:

Forrester MM. Understanding water fluxes through land, vegetation and air with coupled atmospheric and hydrologic modeling at extreme scales. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/174215

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