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You searched for +publisher:"Colorado School of Mines" +contributor:("Bell, Colin D."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Colorado School of Mines

1. Brown, Jacob. Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff.

Degree: MS(M.S.), Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2018, Colorado School of Mines

Urbanization can dramatically alter stormwater, both the quantity and quality, by engendering larger peak flows and through the introduction of contaminants into stormwater runoff. This study builds upon previous research that developed relationships between a suite of nonpoint source contaminants, known as trace organic contaminants (TOrCs), and hydrologic measurements for a series of storms in Madison, WI, by creating statistical and deterministic models. Stormwater runoff from both a commercial site and a high-density residential site was characterized for TOrCs in a previous study. Correlations and regressions were calculated between TOrC loads and hydrologic measurements for both sites. Regressions were possible for all but two contaminants. From the regressions, it became evident that loading responses to precipitation were not the same between the two land covers for some TOrCs. The regressions were transferred to the Source Loading and Management Model for Windows (WinSLAMM), an event-based hydrologic and water quality model, to demonstrate how it can be used to model novel contaminants. The regressions were also used to estimate mean annual loads of TOrCs from all commercial and high-density residential areas in Madison, WI. This work will ultimately allow managers to simulate the presence and mitigation of TOrCs through stormwater best management practices. Advisors/Committee Members: Hogue, Terri S. (advisor), Bell, Colin D. (committee member), Higgins, Christopher P. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: model; trace organic contaminant; WinSLAMM; stormwater; land cover; urban

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APA (6th Edition):

Brown, J. (2018). Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff. (Masters Thesis). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/172508

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Brown, Jacob. “Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff.” 2018. Masters Thesis, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/172508.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Brown, Jacob. “Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff.” 2018. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Brown J. Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Colorado School of Mines; 2018. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/172508.

Council of Science Editors:

Brown J. Modeling trace organic contaminants in commercial and high-density residential urban stormwater runoff. [Masters Thesis]. Colorado School of Mines; 2018. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/172508


Colorado School of Mines

2. Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.

Degree: PhD, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2020, Colorado School of Mines

Urbanization is expected to persist in cities across the world, resulting in increased percent imperviousness, alterations to the hydrologic regime, degraded water quality, and deteriorated ecosystems. Stormwater Control Measures (SCMs) have been developed to mitigate some of the impacts of urban development, but come in a wide range of designs and have variable hydrologic performance based on their primary function. SCMs exist on a continuum that ranges from green (typically above ground infrastructure that includes vegetation) to grey (large storage facilities or underground distributed infrastructure). The decision-making process for an optimal stormwater management plan on a watershed-scale is complex and multi-faceted. Conflicting stakeholder interests need to be considered when determining the optimal suite of SCMs for a particular watershed. Hydrologic models, such as the EPA’s System for Urban Stormwater Treatment and Analysis INtegration (SUSTAIN) can be used to simulate water quantity and quality as well as evaluate the implementation of SCMs on a watershed-scale. Decision support tools can assist stakeholders and decision makers in optimizing between varying SCM types based on the needs and priorities of their specific watershed and communities. The research in this dissertation uses a hydrologic model and decision support tool and aims to improve stormwater modeling by 1) exploring the feasibility of meeting regulatory compliance with the implementation of SCMs, 2) investigating the performance and tradeoff of greener to greyer SCMs using optimizations, and 3) improving the decision-making process by incorporating life cycle costs and a benefit analysis with stormwater modeling. A multi-watershed analysis conducted in Los Angeles County found that meeting water quality regulations when implementing SCMs on a watershed-scale is dependent on percent imperviousness and land use characteristics which impact baseline water quantity and quality. Despite routing runoff from 90% of the watershed to greener SCMs only three of the six simulated SCM solutions reached compliance in the Ballona Creek watershed and none were successful in the Dominguez Channel and Los Angeles River watersheds, highlighting the need for a more robust planning-level approach to determine the optimal stormwater management plan. The investigation of greener vs greyer SCMs in the Berkeley Lake neighborhood, (Denver, CO) found that all SCM types offer varying hydrologic benefits based on their design and function. For example, underground infiltration (greyer) and infiltration trenches (greener) are optimal for reducing average annual flow volume while underground detention (greyer) and vegetated swales (greener) are better at reducing pollutant average annual concentrations. Optimizing (maximizing a benefit and minimizing cost) between thousands of SCM solutions and rating benefits based on stakeholder preferences identified that while the primary goal of a watershed may initially put more weight on particular SCM types, the consideration… Advisors/Committee Members: Hogue, Terri S. (advisor), Kroepsch, Adrianne (committee member), Smith, Steven M. (committee member), Smith, Jessica, 1980- (committee member), Bell, Colin D. (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: hydrologic modeling; stormwater control measures; green infrastructure; urbanization; stormwater

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Gallo, E. M. (2020). Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. “Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Gallo, Elizabeth Marie. “Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions.” 2020. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Gallo EM. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335.

Council of Science Editors:

Gallo EM. Developing an integrated planning-level approach for optimizing green to grey stormwater management solutions. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175335


Colorado School of Mines

3. Blount, Kyle. Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States.

Degree: PhD, Civil and Environmental Engineering, 2020, Colorado School of Mines

In the semi-arid western U.S., urban water systems are facing growing challenges to both supply and demand associated with growing populations, urban development, wildfires in headwaters basins, and climate change. Wildfire and climate change can alter the volume and timing of water delivery to downstream systems, and projected increases in temperature are expected to increase demand in urban systems. Along the Colorado Front Range, extensive redevelopment is changing the characteristics of the urban systems that drive water demand. To better understand the impacts of disturbance on regional water supply and demand, this dissertation assesses post-fire changes to water yield in a burned watershed in the Rockies and investigates trends in and drivers of urban irrigation, a consumptive use of water, in Denver, Colorado. After the Chippy Creek Fire in 2007, the Mill Creek Basin in Montana experienced abrupt shifts in vegetation, from evergreen forest to shrub/scrub and grasslands, resulting in significant changes in local hydrologic partitioning and altering downstream supplies. Evapotranspiration from the basin decreased by 46%, and water yield increased by 140% during the first decade after the fire with no clear recovery trends. In Denver, temperature and land cover influenced demand for outdoor water use between 1995 and 2018. Increasing temperatures drove significant increases in irrigation rates in 37% of Denver census block groups, and the percentage of water used outdoors increased significantly across the city during this period. Finally, examinations of irrigation rates at the parcel scale in Denver show significant differences between land uses that are associated with variation in impervious land cover. Modeled residential redevelopment scenarios show reductions of 141,000 m3 (114 AF) of residential outdoor use per 1% increase in single-family parcels redeveloped to multi-family units. This work contributes essential insights toward improving the resiliency of water systems and understanding key factors that influence sustainable urban development. Despite the destructive nature of wildfire, results indicate that increases in water yield following fire in headwaters basins can be utilized for downstream urban supply if managers appropriately plan for altered volume and quality. As temperatures rise and indoor water use becomes more efficient or is recycled, outdoor use comprises an increasingly large portion of total urban water demand, posing challenges to climate adaptation within water-limited cities. However, by integrating land use and water planning, the residential redevelopment of urban areas provides opportunities to reduce outdoor demand and design urban green spaces to achieve multiple benefits efficiently. Advisors/Committee Members: Hogue, Terri S. (advisor), Ajami, Newsha (committee member), Bell, Colin D. (committee member), Read, Laura (committee member), Singha, Kamini (committee member), Smith, Jessica, 1980- (committee member).

Subjects/Keywords: irrigation; remote sensing; wildfire; redevelopment; hydrology; urban water supply

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Blount, K. (2020). Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States. (Doctoral Dissertation). Colorado School of Mines. Retrieved from http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175341

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Blount, Kyle. “Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Colorado School of Mines. Accessed March 06, 2021. http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175341.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Blount, Kyle. “Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States.” 2020. Web. 06 Mar 2021.

Vancouver:

Blount K. Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. [cited 2021 Mar 06]. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175341.

Council of Science Editors:

Blount K. Assessing the impacts of hydrologic disturbances on urban water supply and demand in the western United States. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Colorado School of Mines; 2020. Available from: http://hdl.handle.net/11124/175341

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