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You searched for +publisher:"Cleveland State University" +contributor:("Genovese, Jeremy"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Cleveland State University

1. Turner, Donna Michele Smith. Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom.

Degree: PhD, College of Education and Human Services, 2015, Cleveland State University

Historically, teachers have exercised considerable autonomy in the day-to-day learning that occurs in their classrooms. Now, it is growing increasingly rare for a teacher to experience this type of professional freedom. In response to high-stakes testing, national and state academic content standards, and most recently the common core standards, pacing guides are one of the more recent devices schools are using to implement and monitor curriculum. The purpose of this research project is to investigate teacher opinion toward these pacing guides. An online survey called the Pacing Guide Survey was delivered to secondary regular and special education teachers in core subject areas of mathematics, science, social studies, and language arts. The teachers were asked about whether or not they use pacing guides, their attitude and comfort level in using pacing guides, as well as: Information concerning the population of their high school, such as demographics, enrollment, and single or multiple high schools; Building level factors, such as professional development initiatives, methods of curriculum monitoring, and pacing guide development and revisions processes; Teacher factors, such as years teaching, years using pacing guides, confidence in content area, and educational background. Administrators were also interviewed to form a complete picture of pacing guide development and implementation in the secondary education environment. Quantitative data were analyzed using bivariate Spearman’s rank order correlation and qualitative data were analyzed using a combination of thematic data analysis and quasi-statistical methods. Recommendations based on the data collected are: Teachers should be provided with the flexibility to address student needs in the classroom. Teacher input into pacing guide development, implementation, and revision process is necessary to ensure that student needs are addressed. Team autonomy is key and teacher teams need to be provided with the necessary support structure to provide meaningful learning experiences for their students. Advisors/Committee Members: Genovese, Jeremy (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Education Policy; Education; Educational Evaluation; Educational Leadership; Secondary Education; School Administration; Curriculum Development; pacing guides; curriculum monitoring; secondary education

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APA (6th Edition):

Turner, D. M. S. (2015). Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1435593110

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Turner, Donna Michele Smith. “Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom.” 2015. Doctoral Dissertation, Cleveland State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1435593110.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Turner, Donna Michele Smith. “Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom.” 2015. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Turner DMS. Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2015. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1435593110.

Council of Science Editors:

Turner DMS. Teacher Perception of Pacing Guide Use in the Secondary Classroom. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2015. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1435593110

2. Stephens, Joshua. Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research.

Degree: PhD, College of Education and Human Services, 2013, Cleveland State University

Effect sizes are the statistic generated by meta-analyses, a commonly used statistic in education research. Meta-analyses are widely used by education practitioners, administrators, and policy makers as a means to decide best classroom or school practices. It has been suggested by authors in other fields, most notably Jennions and Moller (2001), that effect sizes have declined over time due to various sources of bias. This paper examines the question of whether shifting effect sizes can be observed in educational research and attempts to explain possible causes of this observation. It uses the methodological framework used by Jennions and Moller (2001) and applies it to educational meta-analyses conducted from 1970 to the present. It finds that, contrary to the findings of Jennions and Moller (2001), that effect sizes in educational research have increased over time. Likely explanations regard systemic bias in the conduct and publication of educational research. The paper concludes with recommendations for future research to examine causal factors contributing to this phenomenon. Advisors/Committee Members: Genovese, Jeremy (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Educational Theory; Education; Meta-analysis; research methodology; bias

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APA (6th Edition):

Stephens, J. (2013). Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1367322715

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Stephens, Joshua. “Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research.” 2013. Doctoral Dissertation, Cleveland State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1367322715.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Stephens, Joshua. “Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research.” 2013. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Stephens J. Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2013. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1367322715.

Council of Science Editors:

Stephens J. Longitudinal stability of effect sizes in educational research. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2013. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1367322715

3. Meeks, Lisa M. COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME.

Degree: PhD, College of Education and Human Services, 2014, Cleveland State University

This study examines the potential mediating effects of prior knowledge regarding autism spectrum disorders and Asperger syndrome (AS), first and second-generation family ties, college major, gender, and level of exposure to Dr. Sheldon Cooper, the main character of The Big Bang Theory, on college students perceptions of a popular television character who displays traits and characteristics of Asperger syndrome/autism spectrum disorder. Bandura's (1971a) Social Learning Theory and Social Cognitive Theory (2004b) provide the framework through which the researcher attempts to understand how popular media impacts college students perceptions of autism spectrum disorders. A total of 102 college students (aged 18-40 years) from multiple colleges across the United States completed two instruments that were modified for use in this study: The Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ; Baron-Cohen, 2001), and the Shared Activities Questionnaire (SAQ; Morgan, Walker, Bieberich, & Bell, 1996). Participants also answered demographic questions relating to age, race, major, exposure to The Big Bang Theory, and a researcher-developed knowledge of autism questionnaire. Students overwhelmingly rated Sheldon Cooper as an individual with AS. Findings from the study indicate that gender, ethnicity, income level, and exposure to The Big Bang Theory were statistically significant predictors for students’ rating of Sheldon Cooper as an individual with AS. Being a math/science/engineering major or having a second degree relationship with a person on the spectrum did not significantly predict students ratings of Sheldon as an individual with AS, nor did these variables predict students desire to engage with Sheldon in an academic, social or recreational domain.The use of Sheldon from The Big Bang Theory as an introduction to AS may be a valuable tool for working with the peers of students on the spectrum as findings suggest that repeated exposure to The Big Bang Theory reduces students clinicalization of Sheldon Cooper's behavior, perhaps through normalization of behaviors or exposure to prosocial modeling via behaviors of the supporting cast. Advisors/Committee Members: Genovese, Jeremy (Committee Chair).

Subjects/Keywords: Behaviorial Sciences; Communication; Developmental Psychology; Educational Psychology; Higher Education; Asperger Syndrome; Sheldon Cooper; The Big Bang Theory; Social Learning Theory; Perceptions of ASD; Popular Television; Entertainment Education; ASD; Autism; College Students; Autism Quotient; Shared Activities Questionnaire; Prosocial Modeling; Media

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Meeks, L. M. (2014). COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME. (Doctoral Dissertation). Cleveland State University. Retrieved from http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1398938713

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Meeks, Lisa M. “COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME.” 2014. Doctoral Dissertation, Cleveland State University. Accessed November 22, 2019. http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1398938713.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Meeks, Lisa M. “COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME.” 2014. Web. 22 Nov 2019.

Vancouver:

Meeks LM. COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2014. [cited 2019 Nov 22]. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1398938713.

Council of Science Editors:

Meeks LM. COLLEGE STUDENTS PERCEPTIONS OF AND BEHAVIORAL INTENTIONS TOWARD A POPULAR MEDIA CHARACTER WITH QUALITIES OF ASPERGER SYNDROME. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Cleveland State University; 2014. Available from: http://rave.ohiolink.edu/etdc/view?acc_num=csu1398938713

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