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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Phil Brown"). Showing records 1 – 2 of 2 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Furtick, Joshua Jenkins. Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber.

Degree: MS, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 2016, Clemson University

Rare earth-polymer blends can be useful in many applications including safety, security, displays, and novelty. Polyester, specifically polyethylene terephthalate, is a ubiquitous material in the world today and offers many opportunities for the usefulness of visible light rare earth emissions. In this work we have attempted to incorporate rare earth complexes with polyester yarn using various methods including coating, extrusion, and dyeing, with the latter having the most success. Nanoparticles were used initially for these experiments, however certain limitations of the particles could not be overcome, for example the size of the particles and the incompatibility of the inorganic matrix with the organic yarn. A chelate complex was then synthesized. The chelate provided a smaller size for integration with the yarn, molecular compatibility with the organics, and comparable emission properties to the nanoparticles. Terephthalic acid was selected as the ligand of choice. Methods of dyeing used for incorporation started with small scale, single strand tests. A pot dye system was used for conducting numerous simultaneous trials. A package dye system was used to incorporate the chelate complexes into entire spools of yarn. The package dyed yarn was knitted into long tubes for analysis. The package dye proved to be a viable method for incorporation, however certain complications arose in the execution of the dyeing detailed within. Notably, a striped pattern of discoloration similar to barré discoloration appeared in the package dyed samples. It was concluded that the discoloration is a result of the machine used, and not reflective of the efficacy of the process. Analytical methods included elemental analysis using scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray techniques, spectral analysis using photoluminescence, and qualitative analysis based on observations made with the samples illuminated under ultraviolet light. Advisors/Committee Members: John Ballato, Phil Brown, Gary Lickfield.

Subjects/Keywords: Polyethylene terephthalate; Rare earth; Materials Science and Engineering

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Furtick, J. J. (2016). Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/3028

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Furtick, Joshua Jenkins. “Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber.” 2016. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed September 21, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/3028.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Furtick, Joshua Jenkins. “Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber.” 2016. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Furtick JJ. Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/3028.

Council of Science Editors:

Furtick JJ. Rare Earth Emissions from Polyethylene Terephthalate Fiber. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/3028


Clemson University

2. Hawkins, Thomas Wade. The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers.

Degree: PhD, School of Materials Science and Engineering, 2020, Clemson University

This research studies and yields new understandings into the materials science and engineering of advanced multicomponent glass systems, which is critical for next generation fiber lasers operating at high output powers. This begins with the study and development of Yb-doped glasses in the Al2O3-P2O5-SiO2 (APS) ternary system, fabricated using modified chemical vapor deposition (MCVD), that, despite being highly doped, possess an average refractive index matched to that of silica (SiO2). The highly doped active core material was subsequently processed through a multiple stack-and-draw process to realize a single fiber with high doping, compositionally-tailored index, and scalability for fiber lasers. Based on the knowledge gained in this first focal area, further strategic compositional tailoring to influence the glass’ photoelastic and thermo-optic coefficient, was performed in order to understand and realize significant decreases in Brillouin and thermal-Rayleigh scattering, which instigate parasitic stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and transverse mode instabilities (TMI) in high power fiber lasers. In addition to understanding the composition / structure / properties of these glasses, a double-clad fiber laser will be fabricated, scaled to over 1 kW of output laser power, and studied in order to relate the materials science and engineering of multiple glass systems and fibers designs to laser performance and properties. Advisors/Committee Members: Liang Dong, John Ballato, Peter Dragic, Stephen Foulger, Phil Brown.

Subjects/Keywords: fiber laser; MCVD; optical fiber

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Hawkins, T. W. (2020). The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2585

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Hawkins, Thomas Wade. “The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers.” 2020. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed September 21, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2585.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Hawkins, Thomas Wade. “The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers.” 2020. Web. 21 Sep 2020.

Vancouver:

Hawkins TW. The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2020. [cited 2020 Sep 21]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2585.

Council of Science Editors:

Hawkins TW. The Materials Science and Engineering of Advanced YB-Doped Glasses and Fibers for High-Power Lasers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2020. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2585

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