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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Huddleston , George M."). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Song, Yun. PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER.

Degree: MS, Hydrogeology, 2010, Clemson University

This investigation examined the feasibility of using free-water surface constructed wetland systems (CWTSs) to decrease the ammonia concentration in oil-field produced water. The objective of this research was to design constructed wetland experiments to determine specific conditions that decrease aqueous ammonia concentrations in simulated oilfield produced water. The design of these experiments was based on biogeochemical pathways of nitrification and denitrification. The experiments included three scales: bench-scale, single-cell, and pilot-scale. Bench-scale reactors contained wetland plants (Typha latifolia) and hydrosoil in 5-gallon buckets. Single wetland cells were constructed by adding hydrosoil and plants (T. latifolia and Schoenoplectus californicus) to 70-gallon containers. The pilot-scale CWTS included four constructed wetland series, each consisting of four cells. One series was designed as a control system, and the other three series were designed to test the effects of aeration and organic matter on ammonia removal. Data from bench-scale experiments indicate that ammonia removal was enhanced by the addition of zeolite, organic matter, and shallow (3 to12 inches) water depth. In the single-cell experiments, ammonia removal was enhanced by the addition of sugar to the water as a carbon source for microbial activity. Ammonia removal ranged from 3.3 to 82.6% in the single-cell experiments, with total nitrogen removal of 1.2 to 53.6%. In the pilot-scale CWTS, ammonia removal ranged from 19.2 to 62.5%, and ammonia concentration decreased from 25 mg/L to 7.92 mg/L. To enhance the removal efficiency, sucrose and oyster shells were added to promote conditions favorable for the removal processes in a redesigned pilot-scale CWTS. The redesigned pilot-scale CWTS achieved ammonia removal ranging from 59.9 to 96.8% and a removal extent as low as 0.73 mg/L. Advisors/Committee Members: Castle, James W, Rodgers , John H, Huddleston , George M.

Subjects/Keywords: Hydrology

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APA (6th Edition):

Song, Y. (2010). PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/1039

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Song, Yun. “PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER.” 2010. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed April 04, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/1039.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Song, Yun. “PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER.” 2010. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Song Y. PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2010. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/1039.

Council of Science Editors:

Song Y. PILOT-SCALE CONSTRUCTED WETLAND TREATMENT SYSTEM FOR AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM OIL-FIELD PRODUCED WATER. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2010. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/1039


Clemson University

2. Kinley, Ciera. Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks.

Degree: MS, Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, 2015, Clemson University

Comparative toxicity data can inform predictions of relative risk, and can be used to implement strategies for altering exposures to mitigate risk. Naphthenic acids (NAs) are a complex group of carboxylic acids that naturally occur in petroleum sources and energy-derived process waters (e.g. refinery effluents and oil sands process affected waters). These compounds are relatively persistent in water and can be a source of toxicity to aquatic organisms. In the first experiment of this thesis, responses of sentinel aquatic organisms to 7-d exposures of commercial (Fluka) NAs were measured (in terms of acute toxicity) to discern relative sensitivities. In terms of sensitivities, fish>invertebrates>plant for exposures to Fluka NAs. Once toxicity was determined, two potential processes for altering exposures were investigated. In the second experiment, photocatalytic degradation of Fluka NAs was measured using fixed-film titanium dioxide (TiO2) irradiated with sunlight for 8 hours. Confirmation of changes in NA concentrations by photocatalytic degradation was accomplished analytically and with toxicity tests using sentinel vertebrate and invertebrate species. The half-life for Fluka NAs achieved by photocatalytic degradation was approximately 1 hour, with toxicity eliminated to both test species (Pimephales promelas and Daphnia magna) by the 5th hour of the sunlight exposure. In the third experiment, environmental conditions that can influence aerobic degradation for altering exposures of NAs were evaluated. Effects of nitrogen and phosphorus concentrations, dissolved oxygen concentrations, pH, and temperature on rates and extents of aerobic degradation of Fluka NAs were measured. Environmental conditions that positively influenced aerobic degradation rates of Fluka NAs included nutrients (C:N 10:1-500:1, C:P 100:1-5000:1), DO (4.76-8.43 mg/L), pH (6-8), and temperature (5-25ºC). At an initial Fluka NA concentration of 61 mg/L (±8), a removal rate of 11.7 mg/L day-1 was achieved (half-life approximately 2.5 days) in treatments with C:N and C:P molar ratios of 10:1 and 100:1, respectively (with other macro- and micronutrients supplied), DO >8 mg/L, pH ≈8, and temperatures >23ºC. Commercial NAs differ structurally from energy-derived NAs (e.g oil sands process affected waters), but environmental conditions systematically evaluated in this study are also expected to affect rates and extents of aerobic degradation of compositionally complex NAs. Ultimately, experiments conducted in this thesis can serve as a model approach for evaluating comparative toxicity of NAs, in terms of relative sensitivities of a taxonomic range of sentinel species, and using that information to implement effective strategies for mitigating risks in aquatic systems. Advisors/Committee Members: Rodgers, Jr., John H, Castle, James W, Huddleston, George M.

Subjects/Keywords: Environmental Sciences; Toxicology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Kinley, C. (2015). Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2282

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Kinley, Ciera. “Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks.” 2015. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed April 04, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2282.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Kinley, Ciera. “Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks.” 2015. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Kinley C. Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2015. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2282.

Council of Science Editors:

Kinley C. Comparative aquatic toxicity of a commercial naphthenic acid and processes for mitigating risks. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2015. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/2282


Clemson University

3. Iannacone, Meg. Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters.

Degree: MS, Hydrogeology, 2007, Clemson University

Coal-fired power plants are introducing flue gas desulfurization (FGD) scrubbers to reduce sulfur dioxide and mercury emissions in order to meet air quality standards. FGD scrubber systems utilize a mixture of limestone, water, and organic acids to precipitate sulfur compounds. The resulting FGD water and associated particulates often contain constituents of concern including chlorides, inorganic elements (Hg, As, and Se), and sulfates that must be treated before discharge. Constructed wetland treatment systems, consisting of an equalization basin followed by wetland reactors, present a viable option to efficiently treat FGD waters. Equalization basins are designed to cool and homogenize FGD water and settle particulates. Specific research objectives focused on equalization basins are: 1) to characterize FGD particulates in terms of elemental and mineralogical composition; 2) to determine size and settling rates of FGD particulates; 3) to determine if Hg, As, and Se concentrations within FGD water stored in an equalization basin change with time; and 4) to determine if toxicity of FGD water within an equalization basin changes during a 24 hr hydraulic retention time. The most common FGD particle type was characterized as gypsum. Other particle types identified included fly ash and iron oxides. FGD particulates settled in an equalization basin are interpreted to have originated during coal combustion and FGD processes. The majority of FGD particulates were determined to be silt size, and settling analysis shows that 95% of these particulates settled to the bottom of a typical 2.5 m deep equalization basin within approximately 4 hrs. FGD particulates contained concentrations of Hg, As, and Se, and as particulates settled, constituents were removed from the water column. Analysis of FGD water samples indicate that aqueous concentrations of Hg and Se decreased in the pilot-scale equalization basins by 20 µg/L and 200 µg/L, respectively, during a 24 hr hydraulic retention time. Data from toxicity tests indicate that equalization basins do not decrease toxicity of FGD water to aquatic organisms. Equalization basins are necessary for initial treatment of FGD water by settling particulates, which may contain Hg, As, and Se. Additional treatment for these waters occurs in the wetland reactors. Advisors/Committee Members: Castle, James W., Rodgers , John H., Andersen , C. B., Huddleston , George M..

Subjects/Keywords: Flue gas desulfurization; Equalization basins; Constructed wetland treatment systems; Geology

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Iannacone, M. (2007). Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters. (Masters Thesis). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/231

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Iannacone, Meg. “Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters.” 2007. Masters Thesis, Clemson University. Accessed April 04, 2020. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/231.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Iannacone, Meg. “Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters.” 2007. Web. 04 Apr 2020.

Vancouver:

Iannacone M. Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters. [Internet] [Masters thesis]. Clemson University; 2007. [cited 2020 Apr 04]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/231.

Council of Science Editors:

Iannacone M. Evaluation of Equalization Basins as Initial Treatment for Flue Gas Desulfurization Waters. [Masters Thesis]. Clemson University; 2007. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_theses/231

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