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You searched for +publisher:"Clemson University" +contributor:("Dr. Russell Marion, Committee Chair"). Showing records 1 – 3 of 3 total matches.

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Clemson University

1. Haun, Elizabeth Demastes. Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers.

Degree: PhD, Education and Human Development, 2017, Clemson University

This phenomenological study investigated how six elementary teachers are utilizing digital tools and how they perceive these tools can meet their needs for professional collaboration. The study was designed using the theoretical framework of social constructivism and the belief that knowledge is created through social interactions, meaningful experiences, and collaboration with others. Teachers' perceptions about the importance of collaboration and how they utilize technology to access resources, knowledge, and engage in critical dialogue with other professionals were investigated throughout the study. Data analysis using Moustakas' (1994) modification of the Stevick-Colizzi Keen method revealed three overarching themes. Teachers are often choosing to use digital tools to engage in professional collaboration after school hours due to a lack of time during the school day. Personal relationships influence the frequency and ease with which teachers engage in digital collaboration. Teachers have positive perceptions about using digital tools for collaboration, but need additional training on how to utilize technology to create collaborative environments that support teacher growth and development. These findings have significant implications for school leaders as they plan professional development opportunities that support teachers' needs for professional collaboration. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Russell Marion, Committee Chair, Dr. Dani Herro, Dr. Hans Klar, Dr. Robert Knoeppel.

Subjects/Keywords: collaborative technology; elementary teachers; teacher collaboration

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

Haun, E. D. (2017). Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2065

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

Haun, Elizabeth Demastes. “Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2065.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

Haun, Elizabeth Demastes. “Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

Haun ED. Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2065.

Council of Science Editors:

Haun ED. Getting Connected: Understanding how digital tools support the collaborative practices of elementary teachers. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2065


Clemson University

2. McMaster, Laura. The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development.

Degree: PhD, Educational Leadership, 2016, Clemson University

The purpose of this qualitative research study was to explore how institutional culture impacts women's political leadership efficacy development. By utilizing a constructivist design and a methodology rooted in feminine inquiry that included an interview and document (photo) analysis, a group of traditionally aged (18-24 year old) college women shared their lived experiences at one public land-grant research institution. The themes that emerged were based on multiple photo-elicitation interviews conducted with the participants throughout a semester. The data gathered was analyzed using a constant comparative method. Interpretation was done, in part, based on a leadership efficacy development framework. The students' sagas explored perceptions, interpretations and experiences related to political leadership efficacy development. They recognized the institution as still heavily male dominated and shared lived experiences that reinforced their perception that women were held to higher standards than men throughout campus. By examining these findings through the context of leadership efficacy development, it was determined that the mixed messages received by participants from the institution impacted their interest, perception and experience engaging in political leadership. The research indicated that reinforcement and enhancement of positive political leadership experiences throughout campus might increase women's political leadership efficacy. The integration of political leadership learning within the curricular and co-curricular systems highlighted how students envisioned a campus culture more focused on political leadership efficacy development for women. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Russell Marion, Committee Chair, Dr. Michelle Boettcher, Dr. Kristin Frady, Dr. James Satterfield.

Subjects/Keywords: College; Culture; Leadership-Efficacy; Political Leadership; Women

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

McMaster, L. (2016). The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1653

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

McMaster, Laura. “The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development.” 2016. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1653.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

McMaster, Laura. “The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development.” 2016. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

McMaster L. The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1653.

Council of Science Editors:

McMaster L. The Impact Institutional Culture has on Women's Political Leadership Efficacy Development. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2016. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/1653

3. De Iulio, Edward B. A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis.

Degree: PhD, Education and Human Development, 2017, Clemson University

As funding for institutions of higher education becomes tighter, state and federal entities have turned to student retention and graduation rates as measures of success to determine levels of financial support. A concept, supported by student development theories, used to increase retention and graduation rates is creating living learning communities (LLCs). Researchers previously concluded that student participation in an LLC positively affects student academic performance, engagement, and retention. The purpose of this study was to investigate how networks developed in a living learning community and what, if any, network variables contributed to academic performance. Specifically, dynamic network analysis using ORA software provided network statistics to determine how network density, component statistics, and cliques developed over the course of the semester. Additionally, ORA software determined social, advice, and study network Newman groupings to study how clusters of students developed during the semester. Finally, a regression analysis using JMP software and ORA derived network measures was accomplished to determine what network variables contributed to positive academic performance. Results found students who are well connected are likely to have better GPAs and consequently higher retention rates than students who are not well connected in the network. It was also interesting to note that residence hall living configurations restricted networking among LLC participants. Specifically, networking did not seem to take place between resident hall occupants who lived on different floors in the residence hall. Practitioners should schedule and promote and students should participate in activities that further network development. Advisors/Committee Members: Dr. Russell Marion, Committee Chair, Dr. James Satterfield, Dr. Michelle Boettcher, Dr. Thomas Zagenczyk.

Subjects/Keywords: Academic Performance; Dynamic Network Analysis; Living Learning Communities; Retention

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APA · Chicago · MLA · Vancouver · CSE | Export to Zotero / EndNote / Reference Manager

APA (6th Edition):

De Iulio, E. B. (2017). A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis. (Doctoral Dissertation). Clemson University. Retrieved from https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2075

Chicago Manual of Style (16th Edition):

De Iulio, Edward B. “A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis.” 2017. Doctoral Dissertation, Clemson University. Accessed January 19, 2021. https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2075.

MLA Handbook (7th Edition):

De Iulio, Edward B. “A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis.” 2017. Web. 19 Jan 2021.

Vancouver:

De Iulio EB. A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis. [Internet] [Doctoral dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. [cited 2021 Jan 19]. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2075.

Council of Science Editors:

De Iulio EB. A Business School Living Learning Community: A Complexity Theory Study of Collaborative Engagement Using Network Analysis. [Doctoral Dissertation]. Clemson University; 2017. Available from: https://tigerprints.clemson.edu/all_dissertations/2075

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